Would you risk it?

Would you risk taking the MPT Qmed oiler course for $3200 in hopes that you would get hired on as a wiper even tho they were looking for a Qmed with RFPEW?

I do hold AB limited just seems risky. Wondering what others would do.

MPT will take another $495 to give you a RFPEW

I wonder if deck time counts for that as i read the check list

Proof successful completion of a Coast Guard-approved or accepted training, which includes: • Not Less than 60 days of approved seagoing service

I self studied when I got my oiler way back when. Unless you got money to burn I would not do a course.
Self study for your oiler and save your money for the rfpew and/or whatever other courses you need to be marketable.

It doesn’t. And it’s not just take a course and go get two months as a wiper. See 46 CFR 12.609(a)(2)(ii) , the requirement is for “completion of Coast Guard-approved or accepted training, which includes not less than 2 months approved seagoing service.”

I got money to blow

So would any one risk doing a 3200$ class first and then search for and hope you got a wiper/Qmed job Honest question

As I understand it, you need 60 days (or 40- 12 hour days), plus the course to get Qmed Oiler, with the exam at the school as part of the course.

You need only six months of seatime (120-12 hour days) to qualify for Qmed Oiler and take the exam at the REC. the exam is extremely easy. You do not need a course to prepare for it.

Why not just get a job as a wiper or deckhand/engineer, work 120 12 hours days, get paid for your time, and get Qmed Oiler for free?

If you have money to spend on courses, there are other courses that are a better value and more likely to lead to good employment.

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Question: what are places to look for a deckhand or deckhand/“engineer” type of job to acquire more seatime and experience?

Answers:

Commercial fishing boats, including fish tenders, floating processors, etc.

Tugboats

Crewboats

Workboats, Marine construction barges and support boats

Yachts

Tour boats

Research vessels

What courses or newly acquired skills might make a deckhand or deckhand/engineer more successful in the job hunt?

The ability to cook, provision a boat, make efficient use of left overs, budget and control costs, organize, keep the galley very clean, and keep a hungry crew happy would make anyone a lot more competitive.

Good ability to tie knots, splice lines, throw lines, jump and climb.

What courses or endorsements might be worth investing time and money into?

STCW BT (Basic Training), Advanced Firefighting,
Tankerman Assistant, HAZWOPER, First Aid and Medicare Provider, and a course that provides RFPNW Assessments

None of those require any seatime. Some employers (HR staff) favor guys with more endorsements, even if they are not relevant to the job.

Other courses to consider:

OSHA 30

EMT, especially “Wilderness EMT” or “Remote EMT”. At least one school offers an EMT course that includes USCG approved Med-PIC.

GWO (Global Offshore Wind) now offered to the public at Mass Maritime Academy.

If you have seatime and can get any type of license, even if it’s only a 360 day Master 100 Inland, you should get it. Once you have a license, consider the 5 day Radar Observer course.

More courses: computer network administration, word, excel, welding, Diesel engine repair, electronics, etc.

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I sent you a PM. That GWO you linked looks like fun. Going to need to wait for pricing on that one. That looks expensive. I did not think Hazwoper would help any one get a job. Is that something HR. Really looks for?

Many companies that transport oil or do spill clean up require HAZWOPER. It’s a short, cheap course.