The Cain Mutiny

I watched a 1954 movie last night that was pretty cool. The Cain Mutiny film is a 1954 American fictional drama set in World War II. Directed by Edward Dmytryk and produced by Stanley Kramer, it stars Humphrey Bogart, José Ferrer, Van Johnson, and Fred MacMurray, and is based on [I]The Caine Mutiny,[/I] the 1951 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel written by Herman Wouk. The film depicts the events on board a fictitious World War II U.S. Navy destroyer minesweeper and the subsequent court-martial of two officers. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Actor (Humphrey Bogart), Best Supporting Actor (Tom Tully), Best Screenplay, Best Sound Recording (John P. Livadary), Best Film Editing, and Best Dramatic Score (Max Steiner).[SUP][3][/SUP] It was the second highest-grossing film in the United States in 1954.[SUP][4][/SUP]

Dmytryk was nominated for a Directors Guild Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures.

I started watching it just because it was on, but soon couldn´t look away. I would definitely recommend to my shipmates.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;179932]I watched a 1954 movie last night that was pretty cool. The Cain Mutiny film is a 1954 American fictional drama set in World War II. Directed by Edward Dmytryk and produced by Stanley Kramer, it stars Humphrey Bogart, José Ferrer, Van Johnson, and Fred MacMurray, and is based on [I]The Caine Mutiny,[/I] the 1951 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel written by Herman Wouk. The film depicts the events on board a fictitious World War II U.S. Navy destroyer minesweeper and the subsequent court-martial of two officers. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Actor (Humphrey Bogart), Best Supporting Actor (Tom Tully), Best Screenplay, Best Sound Recording (John P. Livadary), Best Film Editing, and Best Dramatic Score (Max Steiner).[SUP][3][/SUP] It was the second highest-grossing film in the United States in 1954.[SUP][4][/SUP]

Dmytryk was nominated for a Directors Guild Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures.

I started watching it just because it was on, but soon couldn´t look away. I would definitely recommend to my shipmates.[/QUOTE]

It’s a classic that I’ve seen several times. I’d recommend the book by Herman Wouk if you can find a copy. It’s a pretty good read and does not end with the trial.

It also had one of my favorites, the great Lee Marvin.

One of my all time favorite films. . . even away from the ship, the footage of the Yosemite Firefall and the Awhannee hotel is amazing. . . Jose Ferrer is absolutely brilliant. . . as is the rest of the cast. . . and if one has spent more than five years at sea, I think that we have ALL sailed with a Queeg. . . .

The book is excellent. One of the best books I have ever read; it has you switching sides throughout before you realize that it is happening. Through a book, it helps to illustrate how easy it can be for crews to be swayed one way or another, particularly if there is questionable or weak leadership. While fictitious, it struck me as a great lesson in crew dynamics and close quarters interactions when I read it. I would recommend it to anyone in a management or leadership position.

[QUOTE=MASSAILOR;180118]The book is excellent. One of the best books I have ever read; it has you switching sides throughout before you realize that it is happening. Through a book, it helps to illustrate how easy it can be for crews to be swayed one way or another, particularly if there is questionable or weak leadership. While fictitious, it struck me as a great lesson in crew dynamics and close quarters interactions when I read it. I would recommend it to anyone in a management or leadership position.[/QUOTE]

Herman Wouk wrote from his own personal experience. He served in the Pacific during WWII. I agree, this should be required reading for persons in leadership positions.

Clips from the movie were prominent in the LMS class I recently took.

Quite the study in leadership skills

[QUOTE=cmakin;180061]One of my all time favorite films. . . even away from the ship, the footage of the Yosemite Firefall and the Awhannee hotel is amazing. . . Jose Ferrer is absolutely brilliant. . . as is the rest of the cast. . . and if one has spent more than five years at sea, I think that we have ALL sailed with a Queeg. . . .[/QUOTE]

Back in the day SeaLand had a pair of captains on a ship that were referred to as the maniac and the moron. Down right scary sometimes.

Agree it is a good read.

If you read the book, you’ll realize that the story really isn’t about Queeg.

It’s about Willie Keith.

Again, excellent book- if you can pick up a copy before your next trip, do it

great movie! and yes, the scene of Yosemite in that time was neat. The attorney really laid it out in the end and catherder, I guess Keith learned something, not sure i did though!! ya, I’ve sailed with a queeg or worse, we learn and we grow though at the time it’s always the shits. We should have a list of movies permanently posted at the top of the forum for a night when watching a movie is on the list.

Since we’re about the movie now, in the storm sequence when Merrick advises the Capt to take on ballast, he replies “I don’t want my fuel lines fouled up with salt water!”

Can someone explain that answer, please (and if it makes sense, why)?

[QUOTE=civmar;180231]Since we’re about the movie now, in the storm sequence when Merrick advises the Capt to take on ballast, he replies “I don’t want my fuel lines fouled up with salt water!”

Can someone explain that answer, please (and if it makes sense, why)?[/QUOTE]

most naval vessel have few if any sw ballast tanks so the only way to ballast down is to flood fuel oil tanks with seawater

in the case of a destroyer or that type of hull, survival in a severe storm could only happen if any empty fuel tanks were filled since with few other variable weights the ships are inherently top heavy.

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[QUOTE=civmar;180231]Since we’re about the movie now, in the storm sequence when Merrick advises the Capt to take on ballast, he replies “I don’t want my fuel lines fouled up with salt water!”

Can someone explain that answer, please (and if it makes sense, why)?[/QUOTE]

Years ago, that’s how the Navy compensated for fuel consumption. The fuel tanks could be filled with salt water.

The system was called WCFS or Water Compensated Fuel Systems.

I think there’s a few such ships still around. Maybe the Arleigh Burke class still uses it?

[QUOTE=c.captain;180233]most naval vessel have few if any sw ballast tanks so the only way to ballast down is to flood fuel oil tanks with seawater

in the case of a destroyer or that type of hull, survival in a severe storm could only happen if any empty fuel tanks were filled since with no other variable weights the ships are inherently top heavy[/QUOTE]

Older commercial vessels would also carry ballast in the fuel tanks. . .

[QUOTE=cmakin;180251]Older commercial vessels would also carry ballast in the fuel tanks. . .[/QUOTE]

Years ago, we’ve ballasted fuel tanks in tugs and fishing boats. It wasnt routine but sometimes it had to be done.

[QUOTE=tugsailor;180254]Years ago, we’ve ballasted fuel tanks in tugs and fishing boats. It wasnt routine but sometimes it had to be done.[/QUOTE]

I recall crawling some double bottoms on the old liner BRASIL when it was sailing out of NOLA for Commodore Cruise Lines. . . it was retrofitted to segregate the fuel system from the ballast. . . there was still a non reactive black coating in the ballast tanks. I also remember being involved with the modification of a segregated ballast system on the old Sealift Tankers. . . remember those? Did a few at Brady Island on the Houston Ship Channel and the rest down in Galveston. . .sheesh, had to be the early 90s, I think. . .