Storm-tossed trawler: Hurricane Michael capsizes new factory trawler North Star


#21

Yes, any electronics with power on at the time has a very short window of opportunity – could be seconds for modern dense boards.


#22

well from what I am seeing here, there is more machinery space flooding than I first thought


#23

If electric cable connections are not specified for use under-water, the water tends to infiltrate the cables between core and insulation.

Then, an invisible corrosion starts…


#24

I really have to wonder if at the end of the day, a Seattle fishing company wouldn’t be better off building, or at least finishing a hull, in the Pacific Northwest. A Gulf Coast yard may quote a few million dollars cheaper on a $50 million boat, but sometimes you get what you pay for. The extra costs of managing a major year long project 3500 miles from home are also substantial.


#25

Sure but just don’t go to Dakota Creek


#26

I guess things have changed. I dealt with them from 03 to 07 and was very pleased with their work on various projects.


#27

Sometimes a cloud really does have a silver lining.

https://www.maritimejournal.com/news101/industry-news/lloyd_werft_averts_bankruptcy_with_pride_of_america_repair


#28

Back when I ran a Marine Electrical Repair Company (back in the 80’s), rule of thumb was anything that was submerged in Salt Water had to come out. If it was fresh water and we were able to get right onboard and being the process of cleaning and drying there was a chance to save some of the equipment.

IIRC, ABS and the USCG wanted any and all wiring replaced after being submerged in salt water. There were some owners that tried to go cheap and not replace everything dnd those vessels got to be very well know for having grounds everywhere and were a PIA to work on as you ended up chasing grounds constantly.

By looking a the few pictures available, she will be under repair for quite a while and I hope that the Owners get the vessel that they hope for and for the crews, I hope she’s repaired correctly because of not they’re going to be very busy chasing grounds.


#29

I was being facetious referring to the ongoing bruha over the fact that DCI used some plate rolled in Europe in the hull of the newbuild factory AMERICA’S FINEST which has now caused the USCG to stoopidly not allow it a fisheries endorsement. DCI does fine work and builds a good ship.

I don’t get it…now does the refit of the cruiseship PRIDE OF AMERICA in Germany relate to the AMERICA’S FINEST or the NORTH STAR?

btw, what happened to the 50% tariff levied against a shipowner for having work done on a US flagged vessel in a foreign country? I guess that is lone gone?


#30

I’ve wondered about enforcement of the 50% tariff too.

There seems to be quite a bit of smaller vessel work being done in Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

There may be a lot ways to play games with the tariff. Some work may simply not be reported, or underreported. Even with a 50% tariff, foreign yards are often going to be cheaper.


#31

but in Germany?


#32

The repair work saved the yard from going bust.


#33

It is still a thing. They even updated the CBP form this year.

Lloyd Werft is still in business but only maintains half of their yard space nowadays. They leased the rest to a company calling itself German Drydocks several years ago.


#34

Salt water is evil stuff.

Few drops of drinking water near the clock battery of a laptop and you’ve got less time than it takes to open the case and unplug the clock battery to save the board, and that’s working fast with the tools right there and knowing how to open the case. Ask me how I know. :frowning: I have a stereo microscope so I had a good view of the couple dozen eaten traces. Three days and six hundred bucks later had it back from the Thinkpad service depot with a new main board.


#35

great a US vessel saves a German yard from closing while how many US yards are ready to do the work? but let me guess that this happens to be the same yard which allowed this very vessel to sink when alongside the dock how many years ago?

I simply love how the US flag has been sold to any ferner who ponies up the cash to get exclusive Congressional mandated and sanctioned monopolies on the business!


#36

As I understood it, the ship hull and superstructure was built in the US as Jones Act requires, but it taken foreign for finishing md fitting out, as Jones Act allows. Probably because no American yard has any modern cruise ship building experience.


#37

Lloyd Werft does specialize in finishing cruise ships. I’ve seen several of the Disney ships there over the years. They go there to get the “German” touch.


#38

Here is Disney Magic getting that “German Touch”:


BTW: The Disney ships are all built in Italy I believe.


#39

Wow. Disney’s Safety Management System is incredibly lax. Working over the side without a floatation device, using suspenders as a safety harness suspended on an open bale hook, paint overflowing out of those pales into the ocean below. Looks like a thorough audit is in order.


#40

Yeah, the whole setup is goofy.