Pictures of Ships, Tugs, Off Shore Rigs, Barges, and those who work them


#701

This tug may be well known to some here:

Seen at a shipyard in Singapore June, 2011.


#702

Anybody know anything about this one?:

Moored at Republic Yacht Club, Singapore, June, 2011, so probably registered as a Yacht.

She appears not to be flying any flag, except the Singapore flag of courtesy, with no identifying name or number painted on the hull.

The style reminds me of that of Japanese Coast Guard, Fishery patrol or Research vessels from the 1970/80s.


#703

Another Navy owned but I believe civilian manned vessel seen at Keppel Singmarine, Singapore in Oct. 2011:


#704

Nothing US here, but the HLV Fjord loaded with 26 tugs on deck may be interesting to some:

Standing room only:


Ready to leave from Singapore, July 2011. Bound for Venezuela, via Cape of Good Hope in the winter. (No damages reported)

All tugs 2400 - 3200 Bhp. Built in Malaysia and Indonesia. Basic but efficient for their purpose to towing barges around.


#705

[QUOTE=ombugge;174541]Another Navy owned but I believe civilian manned vessel seen at Keppel Singmarine, Singapore in Oct. 2011:

[/QUOTE]

A SWATH. . . the darling design of the 90s. . . . while VERY stable, not much of a variable load and VERY tender. . . was involved in a new construction of a Casino boat SWATH, started at Brown and Root in Houston back in the mid 90s. . . had to reduce the size of the filet welds to allow for the weight of the slot machines. . . and coins. . . had issues. . I even caught a welder slugging the welds with rods, ala the old Liberty Ship/T-2 methods. Was proud of his achievement and told me. . .and I told them to cut out every weld to make sure that they weren’t slugged. . . Incomplete vessel moved to Jacksonville. Don’t know the eventual disposition.


#706

Some more pictures that may be of interest.
McDermott’s North Ocean 102:

I believe this one is working in the GOM. Flagged in Malta but now 100% McDermott owned, hence the bullet holes in the “102”


#707

Tidewater has had a 100% owned Norwegian subsidiary since 2013, Troms Offshore: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20130514006959/en/Tidewater-Announces-Agreement-Acquire-Troms-Offshore-Supply

The company is situated in Tromsoe and specializes in operating large modern PSVs in the Norwegian Arctic, off Greenland, in the North Sea and under Norwegian (NOR)flag. Here is the newest, the Troms Arcturus:


Tidewater obviously wants to publicize their ownership.

They also have two newbuilt vessels working worldwide under Isle of Man flag: http://www.offshoreenergytoday.com/tidewater-buys-two-under-construction-psvs/

Here is the first of them, Troms Mira:

They are used to rough conditions:

Playing hide & seek off Greenland:

One of their older and smaller vessel in icy conditions:


#708

I don’t know if this one has been in GOM for any job yet?

The world’s most powerful towing vessel, Far Samson, 423 m.t. Bollard pull: http://www.saipem.com/SAIPEM_en_IT/scheda/Vessels/Far+Samson.page?

Mainly used for heavy trenching using a very large plow:

Heading out for a job somewhere:


#709

Here are a few from the engine room of the JEREMIAH O’BRIEN, shot last January.

DSC_7597 by

DSC_7604 by

DSC_7609 by

DSC_7612 by

DSC_7615 by


#710

I’ve no idea what I’m looking at. What’s that last photo?


#711

I’m gonna go with an unconnected section of crank from the reciprocating engine.

(o,0)/

Are those Combustion Engineering boilers?


#712

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;181341]I’m gonna go with an unconnected section of crank from the reciprocating engine.

(o,0)/

Are those Combustion Engineering boilers?[/QUOTE]

Yes. The crankpin bearing was giving a vibration. It was out being repoured when I was there. Boilers are sectional headers, and these are Foster Wheelers. CE also built boilers for Liberties, as did Babcock Wilcox and others.

Pictures are as follows:

Top: Top of engine, facing aft.
Next: Generator Flat and switchboard
Next: Starboard Boiler burner front
Next: Boiler operating station, facing port forward
Last: Crankpin and connecting rod, bearing removed for repair.


#713

Some more with descriptions:

Starboard Forced Draft Fan:

DSC_7607

Thrust Bearing, facing forward:

DSC_7616

Main Engine, connecting rods, valve actuators and crankshaft, facing aft:

DSC_7611

Auxiliary Condenser:

DSC_7623

Seawater Circulation Pump and Condenser:

DSC_7613


#714

The only thing I’ve ever been on close to that age was an old T2 the Marine Floridian. We had to retube a boiler after an explosion. I had never seen boilers where the tubes were horizontal running. That ship was a working museum still had hot bend pipe all over the engine room. I really wanted to be there when they fired it up so I could see how all of it worked.


#715

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;181345]The only thing I’ve ever been on close to that age was an old T2 the Marine Floridian. We had to retube a boiler after an explosion. I had never seen boilers where the tubes were horizontal running. That ship was a working museum still had hot bend pipe all over the engine room. I really wanted to be there when they fired it up so I could see how all of it worked.[/QUOTE]

I did work on both the MARINE FLORIDIAN and MARINE DUVAL when I was with ABS. They were regular customers when I ran/was the Galveston office. I also sailed on Matson’s old MAUNALEI, a C4 with the same sectional header boilers. Great design and simple. I believe that the design goes back to the late 1800s or more. Usually the superheater is on top, where the economizer sits on most D type boilers. I have also been onboard the OBRIEN when it is a steaming weekend and the fires are lit, generators and other auxiliaries running (all steam, very little electricity used on a Liberty), main engine rolling over very slowly. . . .

http://navy.memorieshop.com/Cargo-Ships/Fire-Room/Boiler.html


#716

Though I may shock the Offshore guys here by showing a PSV of a bit unusual design (for the GoM, that is):

Is this a futuristic concept that will NEVER be built or, if it does, will not be able to do the job of a PSV/OSV??
No, this one was built in 2004 and has worked every day since. (There are several more of this type in service)

She was Ship of the Year in 2004: http://www.shipoftheyear.com/ship-of-the-year-2004/ship-of-the-year-2004-psv-«viking-avant»/

Oh and by the way, she is LNG powered.


#717

Been there done that…

http://hornbeckoffshore.com/fleet/featured/hosmpsv-fleet/370-class-mpsv/hos-centerline

http://hornbeckoffshore.com/fleet/featured/hosmpsv-fleet/370-class-mpsv/hos-strongline


#718

Ombugge is quickly becoming a worthless troll.


#719

I guess he had no idea how the mud for the top/bottom kill was being supplied during the spill. I wonder if his fancy ship is multi classed as sub chapter’s D, O, I, and L?

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/view-from-over-the-oil-spill-site-in-the-gulf/


#720

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;189112]I guess he had no idea how the mud for the top/bottom kill was being supplied during the spill. I wonder if his fancy ship is multi classed as sub chapter’s D, O, I, and L?

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/view-from-over-the-oil-spill-site-in-the-gulf/[/QUOTE]

Oh I forgot. I saw those when watching this from afar. Even DP-2 class. I’m impressed.