Japan whaling fleet

I have read minutes ago here in gCaptain, Japan whaling fleet has fishing 333 whales, 230 of them females and 90% pregnants. I fully realize japanees has the right to eat whale meat, but for the world health y advise, to construct whale farms like in Norway do witn salmons. I Know they must be much greater than salmon ones, but Japan has the money, technology and resources to do it.

Asians don’t care about the environment.

[QUOTE=johnny.dollar;181998]Asians don’t care about the environment.[/QUOTE]

Bit of a Krushing generalization, don’t you think?

[QUOTE=Ground swell;181997]I have read minutes ago here in gCaptain, Japan whaling fleet has fishing 333 whales, 230 of them females and 90% pregnants. I fully realize japanees has the right to eat whale meat, but for the world health y advise, to construct whale farms like in Norway do witn salmons. I Know they must be much greater than salmon ones, but Japan has the money, technology and resources to do it.[/QUOTE]

Whale farms :smiley:

Hehehehehehe

[QUOTE=SeniorJet;182004]Bit of a Krushing generalization, don’t you think?[/QUOTE]

have you ever been to the Far East?

The world needs a hero in these dark times.

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;182013]The world needs a hero in these dark times. [/QUOTE]

yes nothing like a PHAT PHUCKING PHRAUDULENT PHUGITIVE to be our great saviour!

I hope he is enjoying his life in his hideyhole. Have the bloated one been seen in public anywhere these last three years since he has gone on the lamb?

GOOD FUCKING LORD! Just found this article…he is right here in Seattle!

[B]Interview with a Fugitive: Captain Paul Watson[/B]

by Will Potter on January 21, 2014

It’s not easy to interview an international fugitive. After encrypted emails, phone calls from unknown numbers, last minute travel plans changed—in multiple countries—I eventually found myself sitting across from Sea Shepherd’s Captain Paul Watson sharing vegan lemon chicken and Szechuan noodles and talking about desert islands like nothing could be more normal.

For 15 months, the internationally-known environmentalist and star of the Animal Planet reality show Whale Wars has been on the run. He fled Germany in July, 2012, because he was facing extradition to Costa Rica, where he was wanted on charges related to a confrontation with shark-finners on the high seas in Guatemalan waters. Watson says he could never get a fair trial there, and his life could be at risk, so he took to the sea.

The anonymous volunteers who helped him called it “Operation Unknown.” Some started calling it “Operation Where’s Waldo.”

While Watson was on the run, Sea Shepherd’s crew had to prepare for their latest campaign against Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean. The future of Watson, and the organization, was unknown, but there was no use worrying about all that, Watson said: “I don’t do stress.”

Watson is known for his speeches, and if there’s one upside of running for your life it’s the accumulation of new stories. There was the time in Tonga when he and his crew traded canned goods with villagers for fresh produce, and then got lured into a free lunch with Mormons. Or when they steered a Zodiac toward a small island for a camping trip, but didn’t see a rock wall hidden by waves, flipped, and almost drowned.

There were coconuts. “So many coconuts,” he said. And killer wasps: When they attacked Watson, he bolted into the jungle and got lost.

On another Pacific island they experimented with kava, a traditional drink with pyschoactive properties. It didn’t work. “It’s like trying to drink sawdust that has been filtered through a gym sock,” Watson said.

In my attempts to arrange an interview, I had hoped for a rendezvous at sea, or at least some coconuts. But I finally caught up with him in Seattle at one of his favorite restaurants, Bamboo Garden.

A few days before, he found out Interpol’s “Red Notice” had been dropped. He was no longer wanted. He came ashore in California, and alerted customs. Watson expected to be stopped and interrogated, but the only question from customs officers was how they could get some Sea Shepherd T-shirts.

Watson was laughing, and his crew said it’s the happiest they have ever seen him. He told me about reuniting with his daughter and 18-month-old-grandaughter, who he last saw when she was a month old, and he was glowing. At one point during dinner, a couple of fans at another table excitedly said “Hi Paul Watson!” and waved. For a few moments, it felt like this incognito adventure was over.

Then we stepped outside. There was a new black pickup truck in the parking lot, covered with Sea Shepherd logos. I jokingly asked him, “Which car is yours?” He stopped at the edge of the lot, and started the truck’s engine with a remote control. “I got that to make sure there isn’t a car bomb,” he said flatly.

Watson’s fugitive days may have ended, but this fight is far from over.

The U.S. chapter of the Sea Shepard Conservation Society, as his group of sailors who harass illegal whaling boats is officially known, has been mired in a legal battle with Japanese whalers since March of 2012. Despite harrowing video showing the whalers attempting to crush the Sea Shepherd’s Bob Barker between two much larger ships, the whalers say they are the victims of “extremists” and filed an injunction in U.S. court to stop them.

In a ruling for the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, Judge Alex Kozinski agreed and said “you don’t need a peg leg or an eye patch” to be a pirate. Now Sea Shepherd and its board of directors are trying to prove that they haven’t violated that injunction with their protests.

“Our support base doesn’t come from the ‘left’ or the ‘right.’ We’re in front,” Watson says. “The injunction is an attempt to destroy [our grassroots] support.”

Animal Planet has pulled back on its popular Whale Wars program, and scaled the series down to a two-hour feature this year.

Watson has been forced to step down from the helm he occupied for 35 years. Much of the court proceedings, which seek over $2 million in penalties, have been focused on whether or not he actually has pulled back from the whaling campaign. On one emotional day in court, his daughter Lani Blazier testified about his decision with tears in her eyes: “This is a man who gave up pretty much my entire childhood to do what he is doing… The fact that he’s doing this now shows he’s not taking these charges lightly.”

The legal fight has forced Sea Shepherd to decentralize and regroup. “This is a global movement,” Sea Shepherd Captain Alex Cornelissen tells me, listing off names of chapters: Austria, Switzerland, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, South Africa, the list goes on and on. “They’re sprouting up everywhere.”

Right now Sea Shepherd volunteers—sans Captain Watson—are chasing the whalers out of the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. But as they grow more effective, the backlash from the Japanese is only going to intensify. A fundraising plea said that “the courtroom battles… are a fight for the very soul of Sea Shepherd.”

“The future hides in the fog, the present endures,” Watson wrote in a poem he recently posted to Facebook.

“But at these times I let the wind set the course, knowing that the ship will carry on as it may.”

Fraq…I need to put a commando team together here to find the PHUCK and turn him over to his greatest fear, the dreaded Yakuza who I am sure will reward us well if we can deliver his carcass in a black bag. You have served my operations well in the past and want you to fly in the right hand seat. Who else is in with us?

I really dislike the way the Japanese try to pass their whaling as scientific research. The Norwegians, on the other hand, are honest about their activities - the minke whale is caught primarily for human consumption. Personally, I don’t have anything against whaling as long as it is controlled and sustainable, just like any other hunting. In fact, I try to have some whale every time I visit Norway and instead avoid eating over-fished species such as tuna.

[QUOTE=c.captain;182011]have you ever been to the Far East?

[/QUOTE]

Have you ever been to the Near East shore of New Jersey?

Are you serious? This has to be one of the lowest things I’ve seen on this forum.

What are you, are an extremely ignorant fool? Have you ever taken a walk down Orchard Rd.? Stepped off the JR in Shibuya? What about the new 339 shopping center in Chengdu? To me, SIR, those areas are all much, much cleaner and efficient than anything I have seen in the Bay Area or Seattle…but this is not a contest guys.

 [img]http://aboutthemafia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Kenichi-Shinoda.jpg[/img]  They've put a price on his head I can't walk away from.

[QUOTE=c.captain;182011]have you ever been to the Far East?

[/QUOTE]
C.Captain, You for one should have picked up on that. Asian is a race and not a country, with a very large community in the Pacific Northwest by the way.

Senior Jet had a point over the generalization - there is a difference in “not caring” versus lack of public resources or education; any Asian will certainly perceive racial undertones with that post. I thought most people were better than that. So it seems education and resources are still needed in places outside of Asia (or Asians) on various other topics - beside environmental issues where nobody is innocent over history.

[QUOTE=anchorman;182033]C.Captain, You for one should have picked up on that. Asian is a race and not a country, with a very large community in the Pacific Northwest by the way.

Senior Jet had a point over the generalization - there is a difference in “not caring” versus lack of public resources or education; any Asian will certainly perceive racial undertones with that post. I thought most people were better than that. So it seems education and resources are still needed in places outside of Asia (or Asians) on various other topics - beside environmental issues where nobody is innocent over history.[/QUOTE]

Better education is needed in many places, especially outside Asia. The best educated 15 year old kids are mostly in Asia: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/global-school-rankings-interactive-map-shows-standards-of-education-across-the-world-10247405.html

As to who have been in Asia, I plead guilty. I have seen scenery like the one presented as typical of Asia, but I have also lived much of my life in a place in Asia that is both cleaner, safer and better governed and more highly developed than most other places I have been.

Asia is a continent with 4.4 billion people and 49 countries if you count Taiwan and Palestine. And no, Asian is not a race.

[QUOTE=Kraken;182036]And no, Asian is not a race.[/QUOTE]

Around 4 billion of those folks would probably disagree with that statement.

[QUOTE=ombugge;182035]The best educated 15 year old kids are mostly in Asia.[/QUOTE]

While I’m fairly certain I know what you mean, that statement is a bit generalized. Asia is a large area encompassing many of the world’s poorest countries. Just because the top ranked countries are Asian doesn’t mean the best educated are “mostly in Asia”.

[QUOTE=Kraken;182036]Asian is not a race.[/QUOTE]

According to the US census it is. Please provide evidence of your claim.

[QUOTE=Steamer;182039]Around 4 billion of those folks would probably disagree with that statement.[/QUOTE]

You mean that ALL Asians are the same race?? Mongolians are the same race as Indians, or middle eastern Arabs and Melanesians in the east of Indonesia??
Are all peoples living in the Americas the same race, just because they live on the same continent?? If you believe that you have resolved the racial problems in the US and beyond.

http://global.britannica.com/topic/race-human

Glossary
U.S. Census Bureau

Race

The data on race were derived from answers to the question on race. The U.S. Census Bureau collects race data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and these data are based on self-identification. [B]The racial categories included in the census questionnaire generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country and not an attempt to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically.[/B] In addition, it is recognized that the categories of the race question include race and national origin or sociocultural groups. OMB requires that race data be collected for a minimum of five groups:White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander. OMB permits the Census Bureau to also use a sixth category - Some Other Race. Respondents may report more than one race.

http://www.census.gov/glossary/#term_Race

Im not going into a discussion about this, we are literally an ocean apart on this subject.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;182041]While I’m fairly certain I know what you mean, that statement is a bit generalized. Asia is a large area encompassing many of the world’s poorest countries. Just because the top ranked countries are Asian doesn’t mean the best educated are “mostly in Asia”.[/QUOTE]

OK, I’m sure you do understood to, but just in case: More of the highly educated 15 year olds live in Asia then in the entire so called 1st world. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t kids missing out on a good education in Asia, but merely reflect the fact mentioned by Kraken.

There are more Engineers graduating in China every year than in all of the same 1st world put together. Don’t kid yourself into believing they just get handed testimonies, or buy them. That is more likely to happen in the west.