Brown vs blue water

[QUOTE=ryanwood86;87918]You can even get back to neutral ground on gCaptain as well. You can still use the search key and if you have specific questions, come back to this thread and ask it. This site is FULL of good knowledge and very smart people who are willing to help if you show you’ve put some effort in.[/QUOTE]

Ryan my son, you are proving to be an able, wise and worthy gCaptain warrior. I am proud of you lad…keep up the good work!

[QUOTE=seaAggie_904;87901]Ok thanks I’m new i didn’t think to search for my question, which is my mistake. it came to my mind so i made a thread about it.[/QUOTE]

Perhaps we were too hard on you, then again…no. It’s all part of growing up and becoming a mariner. Engineer’s are especially intolerant of those who would join our ranks but appear technically without a clue. You chose engineering not deck. There some who have equated deck majors with business administration majors, not that I would ever insult someone like that.
Come back and see us when you finish your search. Get familiar with spell check while you’re educating yourself . Some of us consider proper spelling a sign of character and respect. You’ll find both come in handy in life and career.

If you want to get a real feel for the industry, go to Google and search Tug jobs. There is a lot of links there I know you can use… Good Luck

SeaAggie it all depends on what kind of engineer you want to become. Honestly here in the Gulf we are over paid glorified tankerman and I’m being serious. We pump a whopping array of basically 4 products water, diesel, bulk, and whatever mud or completion fluid they put on us. Throw in some oil changes and an occasional starter change out and a telephone to call a tech to come to the boat once you hit the dock and you have yourself a GOM engineer. The boredom is staggering. No time off the boat but then again who wants off the boat in the booming metropolis that is Fourchon. So you will be basically be in 2 states, waiting around at C-port to load stuff or waiting around on DP at some rig. Your big excitment will come when you go off charter to go on charter to a new rig that looks exactly like the old one. If you are in it for the money then stay in the gulf try going to drilling rather than OSVs if you can, your responsibillity and activity level will be about the same but at least you’ll have a little better living conditions. Meaning gym, game room etc. Plus you won’t have to listen to mates and abs with their whopping 500 ton licenses, that come in cereal boxes,about how much they know and what all they’ve seen although a 260ft boat in the gulf is HUGE and the only thing they’ve been on since the crew boat they use to run. Deep sea the money is less the tours are longer but you’ll become a much more educated engineer wotking on much bigger equipment with no way of relying on a tech to fix stuff. You’ll learn from old timers that have seen much more on a ship in a year than you will out here in 10.

Thanks for the feedback bunker305… How many different types of engineers are on a drillship? I’m studying to be a 3rd A/E. and ya lately I’ve been more interested in drillships then OSV’s I’m actually trying to get on a drillship this winter break for 30 days.Do you know what the average wages of a 3rd A/E on a osv or drillship are these days? And what made you choose brown water over deep sea?

[QUOTE=seaAggie_904;88133]Thanks for the feedback bunker305… How many different types of engineers are on a drillship? I’m studying to be a 3rd A/E. and ya lately I’ve been more interested in drillships then OSV’s I’m actually trying to get on a drillship this winter break for 30 days.Do you know what the average wages of a 3rd A/E on a osv or drillship are these days? And what made you choose brown water over deep sea?[/QUOTE]

C’mon man! There are only two types of Engineers on Drill Rigs: Petroleum and Marine, and obviously you are Marine! Subsea are overpaid mechanics, they dont deserve the title “Engineer”. USE THE SEARCH ENGINE, will you ever learn.

Preciate the feedback but the last part you could have keep to yourself. My question was directed to bunker305 not the whole board.

[QUOTE=seaAggie_904;88139]Preciate the feedback but the last part you could have keep to yourself. My question was directed to bunker305 not the whole board.[/QUOTE]

Then learn how to use the Private Message function on here as well.

[QUOTE=seaAggie_904;88139]Preciate the feedback but the last part you could have keep to yourself. My question was directed to bunker305 not the whole board.[/QUOTE]

Preciate? Is that French?

boy, with an attitude like yours, you really need to have your head handed to you on a platter! Maybe then you’ll learn?

bon appetit…

" If you are in it for the money then stay in the gulf try going to drilling rather than OSVs if you can, your responsibillity and activity level will be about the same but at least you’ll have a little better living conditions."

Obviously you have NO clue what a drillship engineer does or what they are responsible for. It is way more than starter and oil changes. They rebuild engines, pumps and pretty much anything mechanical. They don’t have a “port captain” or “tech” come on and do the work an engineer is supposed to know how to do. If you are the oil changing starting changing kind of engineer you have no right to denigrate anyone with a whopping 500 ton deck license.

Where the hell do you work were you get away with not knowing anything? Have I called for mechanic or Tech? Of course I have. Do I make a habit of it? No. When they do come bet your ass I’m hanging over his shoulder watching everything he does. That way we don’t have to call him again. I know your type. The glorified tanker man is the fella who sneaks off when his watch is over while the rest of us stay up repairing something. Those guys don’t last while I’m around. If your gonna play that game you wont even get to be a “glorified tanker man/oil changer”. You will be an overpaid wiper/painter. How the hell do you expect to learn something if you bolt when the real work is being done? Along the way there were probably some smart guys that coulda learned ya something. Based on your attitude you were probably napping in the lounge when something broke.

I wouldn’t necessarily say I’m in it for the money. I like to get down and dirty like the rest of you guys. I have a strong passion for this industry since I was raised in it. But I appreciate the feedback it gave me more to think about. What do you do if you don’t mind me asking… Or can I find that in the search engine

Like I said over paid tankermen. Seaaggie, I went to brown water from blue water because I’m a sellout, I took the money and hopped ship. Brown water is not being a sailor it’s being a warehouse attendee. Go bluewater work on some slow and medium speed oil burners, steam plants, gas turbines, evaps.Get some liberty days and go out in port for some raping and pillaging. Raping as a pun obviously. Go be a sailor and learn to be a real engineer. Most of the guys out here have absolutely no first hand experience of that world and only parrot stories of what it’s like. If it’s drillships you want contact all the usual suspects transocean, seadrill, ensco, noble. Most all the osvs out here are fairley new and no company would let you tear into these engines, (that’s what the warranty is for) the office will tell you right before the call a tech so you get very little hands on experience. Sorry to hurt egos here but it’s the truth. Let the bashing begin. PM me seaaggie

“Most all the osvs out here are fairley new and no company would let you tear into these engines, (that’s what the warranty is for) the office will tell you right before the call a tech so you get very little hands on experience. Sorry to hurt egos here but it’s the truth. Let the bashing begin”

Believe me new drillships come with new engines and the engineers damn well better know how to “tear into them” and they had better do so as the maintenance schedule dictates. The warranty doesn’t cover adjusting valves, rebuilding fuel pumps, replacing bearings. This is normal engineer duty. The only reason these OSV companies pay someone to come and do your job is they 1. Don’t want to pay for your training. 2. In the past their “engineers” have done more harm than good. Which relates to item 1.
There is a reason OSV “engineers” have a hard time crossing over to actual engineer positions. I’d honestly rather have a tug guy that has changed out a power pack or two than most of these 6000t OSV starter, oil changing “chief” engineers.

Seaaggie, I’m a blue water guy so I can only offer you some insight into that world only. The pay is pretty well if you want to ship out during the summer and holidays. As 3rd you could make anywhere from 15k to 20k (including vacation). The benefits are great (DBP, MPB, training plan, medical, etc.). the “fringe” benefits are the travel and ability choose your schedule. Kiddos to the post by Bunker305.

I don’t have a ton of time in the oil field, so I saying this with limited experience. On our boat, there’s so much red tape that you have to get approval from the office for most anything. Techs get called quite often and for everything. Our chief gets so frustrated because he can do most of the repairs but the office insists on techs. Everyone wants to save money, but they blow a ton of money on things the crew can do.

Maybe you should look into a brown water position. You can’t find the search button still and it seems reading comprehension isn’t a strong point. Image tearing into a tech manual…

Thanks for the feedback. its seems as if blue water is a better and more exciting job in the long run. It would be nice to sit around and get paid big checks, but to me it means nothing if i can’t help pull pistions, fix injectors, etc… Are there any drillship companys with good benefits other than, “good living conditions”? One thing I never hear anybody who wants to work in the gulf talk about is benefits. my pops told me that licensed mariners on big slow speeds get a pretty good vacation pay. Does anybody know anything about that?

Having to refer to a tech manual everyday would be the death of me. I know in blue water it will be times you have to refer to a manual for certain specs, but not everyday? It seems to me that drill and osv company’s are real picky when it comes to what they will allow engineers to do?

Real picky would be an understatement. Something a blue water engineer wouldn’t think twice about fixing or replacing, a brown water engineer would have to put in a work order, describe what it is, what needs to be done, cost, supplies and submit it to the shore side engineering department and wait to see if he gets the ok or if a tech will be sent out.

[QUOTE=seaAggie_904;88184]Thanks for the feedback. its seems as if blue water is a better and more exciting job in the long run. It would be nice to sit around and get paid big checks, but to me it means nothing if i can’t help pull pistions, fix injectors, etc… Are there any drillship companys with good benefits other than, “good living conditions”? One thing I never hear anybody who wants to work in the gulf talk about is benefits. my pops told me that licensed mariners on big slow speeds get a pretty good vacation pay. Does anybody know anything about that?[/QUOTE]

Most drilling companies have excellent benefits, some better than others.