Army Mariner employment


#1

Hello to all,

I am a US Army Warrant Officer reservist, in training to advance to Marine Deck Officer. I will complete my training at Ft Eustis VA in June of 2011. I would like to gain employment on the civilian side of the industry. When I finish school I will be assigned as vessel master of an LCU-2000 class Army vessel. I have 6 years at sea as of now.

I thought I would ask the experts how to go about this. Should I just shoot out resumes when I finish school, should I contact employers before I finish. Just looking for a starting point. I am also posting this in the employment forum.

Very Respectfully

WOC David Cox


#2

Candidate Cox,

Did you post the same thing in another area of the site or am I just going crazy?

~Jon


#3

Are you going to have a civilian Coast Guard license when you finish this school?


#4

From Proceedings magazine…

http://www.uscg.mil/nmc/proceedings/training_education_pdfs/66%20ARMY.pdf

Army mariners do receive USCG approved training.

I’d be interested in hearing more from our new Warrant Officer regarding his experiences as an Army Mariner.

Welcome, sir…


#5

[quote=ArmyWO;27109]Hello to all,

I am a US Army Warrant Officer reservist, in training to advance to Marine Deck Officer. I will complete my training at Ft Eustis VA in June of 2011. I would like to gain employment on the civilian side of the industry. When I finish school I will be assigned as vessel master of an LCU-2000 class Army vessel. I have 6 years at sea as of now.

I thought I would ask the experts how to go about this. Should I just shoot out resumes when I finish school, should I contact employers before I finish. Just looking for a starting point. I am also posting this in the employment forum.

Very Respectfully

WOC David Cox[/quote]

Talk to CW5 Rainville, he can advise you exactly what your watercraft operator training is approved for, and what you need to do to document it. In general, it is better to apply for your Coast Guard issued documents sooner, while you’re still in the Army. If you wait until you’re out “recency” may be an issue.


#6

Thanks to all for the timely responses.

Yes Jon I did post this in another area, as far as you going crazy, thats a relative thing I guess.

Captain Lee: I will have a Coast Guard License, I am just not sure of the tonnage and restrictions as far as coastal/inland etc. Beings that the LCU-2000 is self deployable I would think my License would include unlimited ocean. Someone in the employment post said 1600 ton.

Trekleader: My experience as an Army Mariner is NADA. All my sea time was in the Navy, a ways back, before they let women on combatants. 6 years in the Pacific and IO. The only US port I ever pulled into was Pearl.

Mr Cavo: Thank you for the POC, I will e-mail CW5 and see if I can get some answers.

Thanks again everyone, this is a great forum and I will visit often…


#7

coolblogger-

thanks for the link, I’m applying immediately!
Will a past history of prison, bankruptcy and no job effect my getting this loan?
I really need it fast so i can get a fix before i start going through withdrawals.


#8

[QUOTE=trekleader;27121]From Proceedings magazine…

http://www.uscg.mil/nmc/proceedings/training_education_pdfs/66%20ARMY.pdf

Army mariners do receive USCG approved training.

I’d be interested in hearing more from our new Warrant Officer regarding [B]her[/B] experiences as an Army Mariner.

Welcome, [B]Ma’am[/B]…[/QUOTE]

Corrected…

…again, welcome to the board. Let us know how you progress in your licensing, I’m sure that there are others out here who are interested in and will benefit from your journey.


#9

I all depends on what civilian license you will hold when you get out. A resume will need to be in order. You can send e-mails, make phone calls, etc. The deciding factor is what type license you will hold, because that will narrow what companies will be interested in you. Once you find that out come back and we can start from there.


#10

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;27164]I all depends on what civilian license you will hold when you get out. A resume will need to be in order. You can send e-mails, make phone calls, etc. The deciding factor is what type license you will hold, because that will narrow what companies will be interested in you. Once you find that out come back and we can start from there.[/QUOTE]

Lee,
Is being a boat driver in the Army like being a bus driver in the Air Force?


#11

You would think it would be better driving boats in the army than buses in the Air Force. Since I was the bus driver in the Air Force, I guess the joke is on me. Not that bus driving really qualified me to work on boats, but it definitely help me realize that I didn’t want to be a bus driver in the civilian world. I also know that I did not get sea time driving the bus.


#12

[quote=trekleader;27154]Corrected…

…again, welcome to the board. Let us know how you progress in your licensing, I’m sure that there are others out here who are interested in and will benefit from your journey.[/quote]

Uhhhhh, not sure what to think of that…

Dave C


#13

[QUOTE=ArmyWO;27194]Uhhhhh, not sure what to think of that…

[/QUOTE]

LOL

Sorry there, Dave…

My mistake…

I had seen something about allowing women in combat positions, and I somehow thought you were saying you were a woman.

Welcome again, sir.


#14

Maybe it’s just me, but I love my woman in the combat position, missionary position, need I go on. probably not…


#15

In 1969 while attending Baltimore school of navigation and Marine Engineering, many of the students were US Army enlisted and warrant officer personell fron Fort Eustiss Va. there to obtain an original or upgrade their license. I was a third mate at the time, upgrading to second. The Army was offering WO2 rank to any Merchant Marine officer who would join the Army (Transportation Corps). This was during the Vietnam war. Remember, at one time the Army had more ships than the Navy,they were called ATS,(Army transport Service) which became MSTS, which then became MSC. I had time with MM&P so I did not take advantage of it, in a way I wish I had, since I had previously served 4 years in the Navy and that time would have counted for seniority.

Sail,


#16

The [B]United States Transportation Command[/B] ([B]USTRANSCOM[/B]) is one of ten unified commands of the United States Department of Defense. The mission of USTRANSCOM is to provide air, land and sea transportation for the Department of Defense, both in time of peace and time of war.
USTRANSCOM, located at Scott Air Force Base Illinois, was established in 1987. As the single manager of America’s global defense transportation system, USTRANSCOM is tasked with the coordination of people and transportation assets to allow the US to project and sustain forces, whenever, wherever, and for as long as they are needed. The current commander of USTRANSCOM is General Duncan J. McNabb, USAF. He took over command on September 5, 2008.
<TABLE id=toc class=toc><TBODY><TR><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><SCRIPT type=text/javascript>//<![CDATA[if (window.showTocToggle) { var tocShowText = “show”; var tocHideText = “hide”; showTocToggle(); } //]]></SCRIPT>
[B]Composed of three component commands: The Air Force’sAir Mobility Command, the Navy’sMilitary Sealift Command and the Army’sSurface Deployment and Distribution Command, USTRANSCOM coordinates missions worldwide using both military and commercial transportation resources.[/B]