Am I too old to start a maritime career?

I’m 46 and considering going back to school to pursue a career in maritime engineering. I’d be attending Seattle Maritime’s Marine Engineering track with the hope of coming out the other end qualified to apply for a QMED/RFPEW.

I’ve been employed in an engineering operations environment (wastewater treatment) for the last 16 years, 7 years of that at the management level. Although there are obvious differences, my current position is roughly the equivalent of Chief Engineer on a boat.

Prior to that I was in the Navy Nuc field for 6 years.

Is it too late for me to start a career in the industry?

At the risk of being on the sharp end of the pointy stick I’ll limit myself to two questions:

[ul]
[li]How is the Seattle Maritime cert viewed in the industry? [/li][li]Does Navy Sea Service have an expiration date? Per 46 CFR 11.213 my Navy Sea Service would be credited ~2.2 years Seatime, but it was 20 years ago. [/li][/ul]

Any advice appreciated.

Cheers

You are definitely not too old.

Too old, no in fact with the recent development of the Canadian government within the next year requiring engineers on US tugs to enter Canadian ports I would say you are in the right place at the right time. Carpe diem

Your navy time is still good. If you can get a copy of your service record, which you should be able to, be sure to include all your evals/ fit reps and any letters, certificates, schools, etc…with your application. You can likely get additional sea time credit.

[QUOTE=Bubble Head;91428]
I’ve been employed in …wastewater treatment for the last 16 years …[/QUOTE]

You’ll feel right at home then. The industry can always use another “turd third” if you decide to go the unlimited route.

I’m just starting off and I’m 48. I don’t feel like I’m too old. Good luck. Hang in there.

Navy seatime is still good but you would need 90 days within the last 3 years to test for a license, that shouldn’t be an issue as you’ll get that while shipping out as unlicensed in the ER on your 1st job.
I don’t know too much about engineering endorsements, but I do know something about Navy Nucs. I’m betting you’ll be bored at school. Don’t sell yourself short on what you may be qualified to receive credit for or be qualified to test for right now. Think about visiting the services of a Commercial Licensing Agent, or just run an application containing every eval/school cert/PQS/Qual Card/Award/Sea Service/Page 2/etc. up to the REC and MNC and see what’s what.

Your never too old…as long add you can still pass any physical requirements your on solid footing. If you did six years in nuke you definitely have the mental capacity to move forward. Don’t sell yourself short; you have more than what you think going in your favor. Though I am not familiar with Canadian requirements, I do know that many engineers in the US tug industry do not even possess a DDE. Get as many endorsements and classes that you can and really sell yourself. If you have a strong background with electrical motor control theory and plc’s you should have no problems finding work. Good luck.

What? Did someone have a problem with the “turd third” reference?

There happens to be great opportunities on cruise ships for junior engineers who have a formal background in wastewater treatment. It becomes the foundation for the job of environmental officer which is a pretty good gig by anyone’s standards.

My advice would be to hire one of these ‘License Consultants’ to babysit your application. They WONT Chase down your DD 214s for ya, but they will ensure what IS sent into the CG is correct and applicable to your situation.

Yeah the cruise ships call them the “environmental engineer.” We all know its the “turd third” or "shithouse mouse"
When I went to school we had a few guys in their 40’s at the academy, so no, you are not too old. I cant speak for that school as I haven’t met too many who claim they went there

[QUOTE=brjones;91651]Yeah the cruise ships call them the “environmental engineer.” We all know its the “turd third” or “shithouse mouse” [/QUOTE]

I guess the site is getting a bit pussified or there are more readers who don’t know what the jobs on ships are called or what they do. It’s a shame really, it’s like there are at least two folks who don’t get it … the one who complained and the one who removed the post because they don’t know what people do on ships. Too bad, first the pointy stick has been dulled and now we have to be politically correct about job titles.

[QUOTE=“brjones;91651”]Yeah the cruise ships call them the “environmental engineer.” We all know its the “turd third” or “shithouse mouse”[/QUOTE]

The environmental officer is not the “turd third”, they are the officer in charge of making sure the vessel is compliant with the thousands of different environmental laws and regulations from the hundreds of different international bodies that make them. They are a three stripe officer, directly under the captain (equal to the chief officer).

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;91668]The environmental officer is not the “turd third”, they are the officer in charge of making sure the vessel is compliant with the thousands of different environmental laws and regulations from the hundreds of different international bodies that make them. They are a three stripe officer, directly under the captain (equal to the chief officer).[/QUOTE]
lol…ok…

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;91668]The environmental officer is not the “turd third” …[/QUOTE]

Nobody said he was, read the posts, #8 is a good place to start. There are turd thirds and there are environmental officers. As per brjones, the polite term for the turd third is “environmental engineer.”

[QUOTE=“Steamer;91671”]

Nobody said he was, read the posts, #8 is a good place to start. There are turd thirds and there are environmental officers. As per brjones, the polite term for the turd third is “environmental engineer.”[/QUOTE]

I read every single post. It sounded to me like he didn’t know the difference, hence my correction. If he has never heard of an environmental officer then assuming it is the same as an “environmental engineer” if a pretty easy thing to do.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;91681]I read every single post. It sounded to me like he didn’t know the difference, hence my correction. If he has never heard of an environmental officer then assuming it is the same as an “environmental engineer” if a pretty easy thing to do.[/QUOTE]

I said environmental engineer and I meant environmental engineer. Not sure how that sounds like I dont know the difference. And they do have the title environmental engineer on cruise ships. If you read the job description it is a “turd third”

[QUOTE=Steamer;91655]Too bad, first the pointy stick has been dulled and now we have to be politically correct about job titles.[/QUOTE]

Where did this news emanate from? The pointy stick is maintained at a ready sharpness for use at a moments notice. I’ve just been doing too much Christmas shopping recently so haven’t been standing watch with my usual “Big Eye” binoculars.

Never doubt that the pointy stick is ready…it’s just more ready at some times than at others!

Now carry on sailor…

[QUOTE=“c.captain;91701”]

Where did this news emanate from?

Never doubt that the pointy stick is ready…it’s just more ready at some times than at others…[/QUOTE]

We all sort of assumed you were on restricted duty or something, maybe in the brig or you lost your ‘pointy stick credentials’. It has been WAY too quiet around here.

I’m currently in the SIU entry program at Piney Point… we have a guy in our class who is 48.

A class below mine, there’s a 60 year old.

I say go for it.