USN to MMD


#1

Hows everyone doing? I would like to introduce myself. I recently got out of the Navy after 4 years of service. 3 years, 2 months of which were spent on the USS Porter (DDG-78) out of Norfolk, VA. I was a STG (Sonar Technician/ Surface) but I did spend a lot of time out of my division. I worked my way up to supervisor of aft sea & anchor operations. I also spent my whole time on the ships VBSS (Boarding team) which wel did a lot of small boat operations.

I got out in May 2008 and moved back to my native New York City and got a job with NYC DOT @ the Staten Island Ferry as a deckhand. I ahve been there since January.

Its a really good job and I have been working on moving up. I am trying to learn about how things go with MMD. I am looking to get my 3rd mates license (as a first step). My only problem is that things are kind of confusing because there aren’t many people in the same boat as me. Most either got their mate’s ticket a long time ago and cant help, graduated from a respective academy with a ticket, or are content staying on deck and have no aspirations of moving anywhere. So it is hard for me to find out the exact information.

My biggest issue is sea time. I have heard conflicting information about the requirements, or should I say documentation of the requirements. My DD-214, whcih is my separation paperwork, says 3 years, 2 months of “Sea Time.” But that is just time served on the vessel the majority of which is tied up to the pier. It was where I went to work everyday but some people tell me that they only count the actual underweigh time, some tell me that the whole 3 years will count. Does anyone have any clarification on this? Any other info or advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks

//Kyle


#2

[quote=Kyle G;15403]Hows everyone doing? I would like to introduce myself. I recently got out of the Navy after 4 years of service. 3 years, 2 months of which were spent on the USS Porter (DDG-78) out of Norfolk, VA. I was a STG (Sonar Technician/ Surface) but I did spend a lot of time out of my division. I worked my way up to supervisor of aft sea & anchor operations. I also spent my whole time on the ships VBSS (Boarding team) which wel did a lot of small boat operations.

I got out in May 2008 and moved back to my native New York City and got a job with NYC DOT @ the Staten Island Ferry as a deckhand. I ahve been there since January.

Its a really good job and I have been working on moving up. I am trying to learn about how things go with MMD. I am looking to get my 3rd mates license (as a first step). My only problem is that things are kind of confusing because there aren’t many people in the same boat as me. Most either got their mate’s ticket a long time ago and cant help, graduated from a respective academy with a ticket, or are content staying on deck and have no aspirations of moving anywhere. So it is hard for me to find out the exact information.

My biggest issue is sea time. I have heard conflicting information about the requirements, or should I say documentation of the requirements. My DD-214, whcih is my separation paperwork, says 3 years, 2 months of “Sea Time.” But that is just time served on the vessel the majority of which is tied up to the pier. It was where I went to work everyday but some people tell me that they only count the actual underweigh time, some tell me that the whole 3 years will count. Does anyone have any clarification on this? Any other info or advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks

//Kyle[/quote]

The USCG generally counts 40-60% USN time. The CG knows USN ships are in port, and also your rate is not really a deck rate, so you may also have some issues there. But at least they should give you some credit. You will just have to add that time to your present sea time. Also, in the past the USCG did not take a dd214, you had to ask for a transcript of sea duty when you departed the USN. Not sure that is the case these days.
You also need STCW95, and a ton of other schools these days. Years back just sea time was needed, not the case now. Going from the deck to lic can be very costly unless you can locate a company that will employ you, and fund the schools.
Bottom line is: head to the USCG, and ask them for an evaluation of seatime and tell them what lic you are going for. You may not be able to go right to the unlimted lic types, but may be able to land a smaller lic with more sea time and schools. good luck…


#3

I would recommend reading The New Hawsepipe by Leonard Lampert. It is a practical guide on how to advance from unlicensed to licensed. Hope that helps.

http://www.thenewhawsepipe.com/


#4

Kyle,
Why didn’t you get your sea time evaluated when you got your MMD?


#5

[quote=Kyle G;15403] I am looking to get my 3rd mates license (as a first step).

Kyle

I admire your goal of becoming a 3rd Mate however you have a long road ahead of you before approaching the “step” to 3rd Mate. I am an 0-3,SWO, OOD (Cruisers, LHA’s, etc.) with about the same sea time as you and if I’m [U]lucky[/U] I’ll be starting as an AB Unlimited. Anyway, with all the school I need, done piece meal when not at sea my goal is to make 3/M in 12-18 months. If I was rich (which I certainly am not) I could go to school straight through and be 3/M in 9 months or so but I have to go to sea to get my classes paid for. :frowning:

It will take you considerably longer because of the sea time you’ll need. You should be credited with 60% of your entire hitch on the Porter. That comes to roughly 684 days. Your time on the Ferry will count as well.You need 1,080 for AB or 3/M. As a SWO/OOD I’m treated a lot nicer as far as sea time goes. I get day for day for my time as JOOD and two days for everyday as OOD so I have way more than 1,080 right out of the gate.

Now the only caveat to all this great info I just threw up all over you is that it applies to Oceans Unlimited which is where I’m headed. It might not take as long to become a Mate on smaller vessels not sailing on Oceans. I’m new to this too and I found licensing on smaller vessels way more confusing than the big ships. So hopefully someone else can help out there.

Without delay you need to get three things from the Navy; 1. Sea Service Transcripts 2. History of Assignments (page 5) 3. Service Record on CD-Rom. Send me a pm for info on that.

There are other options to 3/M such as attending a Maritime Academy (Hopefully you have the GI BILL.) I would seriously look into SIU’s Apprentice Program, a big short-cut to AB. I echo the advice of “rzwllm” get the book The New Hawespipe by Lambert.

Good Luck and hang in there,


#6

Get some kind of Able Seaman rating!
That means Basic Safety Training and Lifeboatman.

After that hurdle you can think about moving up.


#7

Good Luck!


#8

Check out: http://www.maritimelicensing.com/index.html


#9

If getting your license floats your boat (no pun intended) then follow the advice of others on this site. But if you just like being at sea and want to make good money, check out survey companies like Fugro or Fairfield. They are usually very quick to snatch up ex navy sonar techs. The other option would be an ROV company. Typical starting pay would be around 60K-80K depending on the job/position. Within a few years you should expect to break the 100K mark.

Good Luck!


#10

[quote=Azimuth;15468]If getting your license floats your boat (no pun intended) then follow the advice of others on this site. But if you just like being at sea and want to make good money, check out survey companies like Fugro or Fairfield. They are usually very quick to snatch up ex navy sonar techs. The other option would be an ROV company. Typical starting pay would be around 60K-80K depending on the job/position. Within a few years you should expect to break the 100K mark.

Good Luck![/quote]

Man If I was a Sonar Tech that’s the route I’d be going. Great advice.


#11

Hi,
As another former STG I can tell you that the USCG is willing to give you a big fat zero for your sea service…
MTSKIER


#12

Just curious…

Would a portion of Sonarman time count towards QMED?

30+ years ago I was a ping jockey and was in Fox Division (ST’s TM’s and GMT’s), Weapons Department. Why would you think ST’s should have their time counted towards a deck rating?

Kyle, were you a Tech or a striker? “A” school only, or BE+E, Advanced Electronics and “C” school? If you were a Tech you should have no problem getting the Electricians QMED rating.


#13

[quote=seadog!;15512]Just curious…

Why would you think ST’s should have their time counted towards a deck rating?

Seadog

Once again I learned something new on gCaptain. I was wrong about thinking any Navy sailor that went to sea got credit for their time at sea. I now know better. See what happens when I start to think I got this all figured out, I get put in my place (the “new guy” place.)


#14

I was thinking Kyles experience as a Sonarman was more in line with an electrician/electronics technician than a deck ape.

But he did mention extensive use of small boats and supervising the fantail.

After my 4 year active duty hitch as a Sonar Tech I did 2 years in the Reserves as an SP on an Air Force base…go figure.


#15

Hi,
My original contract was for ET school. I did BE& E and then sat around for 2 months. The Nav decided that they had too many prospective ET’s so I was instantly a ST candidate. Did STG “A” school and went to the fleet as a STGSA, in the AS Division - which is part of Weapons/Deck Department.

In a division full of instant E-4’s I did LOTS of deck work. We maintained the fantail (variable depth system), the ASROC deck, and torpedo deck. I did line handlers school and was in charge of line 6, was on the UNREP inhaul, and did look out in the PG when it was too shallow for our active sonar…stood quarterdeck watches until I qualified for ASROC roving security patrol.

So, my point is that you would think that at least some of that would be considered sea time…
</rant>
MTSKIER


#16

[quote=mtskier;15548]Hi,
My original contract was for ET school. I did BE& E and then sat around for 2 months. The Nav decided that they had too many prospective ET’s so I was instantly a ST candidate. Did STG “A” school and went to the fleet as a STGSA, in the AS Division - which is part of Weapons/Deck Department.

In a division full of instant E-4’s I did LOTS of deck work. We maintained the fantail (variable depth system), the ASROC deck, and torpedo deck. I did line handlers school and was in charge of line 6, was on the UNREP inhaul, and did look out in the PG when it was too shallow for our active sonar…stood quarterdeck watches until I qualified for ASROC roving security patrol.

So, my point is that you would think that at least some of that would be considered sea time…
</RANT>
MTSKIER[/quote]

You deserved credit for sure. Let’s not forget the experience you got in Damage Control. Last time I checked everybody aboard is responsibe for that. Seems like thats worth some credit.


#17

Oh ya, Div DCPO…


#18

It’s been an awful long time ago, but as I remember it we had :

[ul]
[li]Operations Dept with Divisions for RMs and SMs, ETs and EWs, OSs, QMs.[/li][li]Supply Dept was divided into a couple of Divisions.[/li][li]Engineering Dept had a bunch of Divisions.[/li][li]And Weapons Dept had Deck, Guns and Fox(ASW) divisions.[/li][/ul]

Other than the ASROC Launcher our Division had no deck maintenance (our VDS was inside, as were our torpedo launchers), stood no Bridge or lookout watches, and we manned line #5 for Special Sea And Anchor Detail with our strikers… the rest of us manned the rails in Dress Uniforms(winter and summer, day or night, rain or shine…we were the Squadron Flagship and had a Commodore aboard…lucky us). We did stand in-port Quarterdeck watches and Security Force details.

I had been crewing yachts before enlisting and was amazed at the lack of seamanship involved with being a sonarman, I was truly disappointed.

That was on a DE a long, long time ago. Personally I would have been ashamed to try to use that experience towards deck time.


#19

[quote=mtskier;15478]Hi,
As another former STG I can tell you that the USCG is willing to give you a big fat zero for your sea service…
MTSKIER[/quote]

MTSKIER, is correct again!

The link below should help some…In the Marine Safety Manual volume III. Look at chapter 2 and on page 2-6 , 2-8 , it lists all the Navy rates and how the USCG rates them…ST’s don’t get a thing…Hopefully there is some info in your records that will gain you some deck time…

http://www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/16000-16999/CIM_16000_8B.pdf


#20

“The link below should help some…In the Marine Safety Manual volume III.”

I just looked at that, boy is it dated, obsolete ratings, all those colunms concerning Pursers, (MSC has 'em-does anybody else?), etc. The Navy has lots of new ratings and have combined others.

When I did my initial seatime credit with the USCG I was able to go in and sit down the Coastie LCDR that was running the REC and we fished through my paperwork; I was able to make a pitch or two to him and clarify my Navy service, he made one additional request of me, I came back a few weeks later with what he requested and got my credit for AB Unl and 3rd mate.

Those were the days… are Mariners restricted from going to the NMC if they wanted to??:confused: