Unlimited tonnage?


#1

Concerning unlimited tonnage for a 3rd mate unlimited, The vessel is an anchor boat in the gulf, the tonnage is 1475/4918 ITC, does this count as unlimited tonnage??


#2

If its COI states that it is a Large OSV then it is not unlimited tonnage. Only OSV’s over 6000grt would be considered as unlimited.


#3

No such thing as an OSV over 6,000grt (not yet). It is unlimited tonnage. The only difference as far as licensing, is the fact that OSVs are approved for a two-watch system within an alternate license scheme which may conflict with actual Chief Mate sea-time when trying to get a Master license. That is an issue of service, not tonnage.


#4

You’re correct…my error. Anything over 6000grt would be a Subchapter I Cargo/Miscellaneous vessel.

Regarding the future Anchorman, you are probably correct as well that there will be an even larger class of OSV’s than at present but I sure as hell wished that they would require unlimited tonnage licensed mariners to man them. You know we aren’t all so arrogant and a few of us are even decent shiphandlers :wink:


#5

C.Captain,
Most of the large OSVs are dual classed as subchapter I as well, and have to form to that class as far as safety standards. The most stringent between the two takes precedence. For OSVs over 6,000 tons, in the future, the OSVs will be held to even a higher standard as tank ships. The mariners, provided the Coast Guard decides to incorporate an alternate license scheme, would include another assessment and training program, to include Management level training ( I’m assuming), for a career path from those that currently have a license for service on large OSV up to 6,000grt , to those over 6,000grt.
You never know how the Coast Guard will consider these proposals that have been in the works for some time, but I have no problem working with unlimited mariners, and I upgraded personally, because in the end, it might be possible that the Coast Guard does require unlimited mariners. Time will tell.


#6

My 3rd Mate AGT just came in a few days ago, and my highest tonnage was ~2200 ITC, so you should be fine as long as your time crosses that magical “1600 ton” threshold.


#7

Yes, it counts as unlimited time.


#8

I guess a simple “yes” would have been good enough.:smiley:


#9

thank you captain Lee for putting it in plain simple language that a 100-ton captain can understand, by the way, working on assessments this hitch and have all the classes for the mate osv done, including gmdss and arpa, there is light at the end of the tunnel, thanks for ALL your help and advice:D:D


#10

What is the magic number for ITC tonnage to be considered for “unlimited” tonnage? So working on a 1600 ton vessel you can get credit for “unlimited” tonnage? Hmmmm…


#11

[QUOTE=curtgetz;19583]What is the magic number for ITC tonnage to be considered for “unlimited” tonnage? So working on a 1600 ton vessel you can get credit for “unlimited” tonnage? Hmmmm…[/QUOTE]

curt, I am sorry to say that the time spent as captain on a jetski will not count for your unlimited time, neither does the time you were captain of:D:D a 28 foot intrepid


#12

If the vessel is listed with its ITC tonnage then yes. ITC tonnage counts towards Unlimitied time. A 500 ton Master with a 3000 ton ITC endorsement running master on an OSV with 2950 tons ITC qualifies just like a 1600 ton Master 3000 ton ITC running on the same vessel. As a matter of fact I was master on a 2022 ton supply boat with a 500 ton Master 3000 ton ITC with guys under me with a 1600 ton Master 3000 ton ITC. I worked on a 3092 ton anchor handler with a 500 ton Master’s license. Of course most of my qualifying time was on a 5922 ITC tonnage anchor handler, but all of the time counted.

To answer your question the magic number is 1601 tons domestic. The only thing that separates unlimited and limited is just 1 ton of steel + a ton of Bull.


#13

[quote=Capt. Lee;19587]
To answer your question the magic number is 1601 tons either domestic or ITC. The only thing that separates unlimited and limited is just 1 ton of steel + a ton of Bull.[/quote]

Actually Net and Gross tonnage have absolutely nothing to do with weight, steel, aluminum or anything else.

Register tonnage does, however have everything to do with volume.


#14

[I][quote=cmakin;19614]Actually Net and Gross tonnage have absolutely nothing to do with weight, steel, aluminum or anything else. Register tonnage does, however have everything to do with volume.[/quote][/I]

The I way explain GRT and ITC to someone who’s never heard of them is to ask them if they can fit a file cabinet that measures 3.5’ x 3.5’ x 3.5’ through a door that is 3’ wide. Under GRT, they can if they take the drawers out.


#15

GRT= total internal volume…NRT= total cargo capacity??

:confused:what about displacement…how about the formulated weight of the volume of water that the “floating object” whether constructed of steel, aluminum or anything else displaces??

what about a submarine that is submerged… is that volume possibly the vessel’s “specific gravity” defined as a weight??:confused:


#16

[quote=jdcavo;19618]

The way explain GRT and ITC to someone who’s never heard of them is to ask them if they can fit a file cabinet that measures 3.5’ x 3.5’ x 3.5’ through a door that is 3’ wide. Under GRT, they can if they take the drawers out.[/quote]

Now that is the best explanation I have ever heard!


#17

Displacement has nothing to do with it. Register tonnage is the taxman’s domain, and the regulators since they collect the taxes, make the rules, and sell licenses.

"… what about a submarine that is submerged… is that volume possibly the vessel’s “specific gravity” defined as a weight??:confused:

A submerged submarine dispaces more than a surfaced submarine but the register tonnage … if it was a cargo carrying civilian submarine and had been admeasured, which military ships are not … would not change at all.


#18

wait a sec, to float a submarine has to displace it’s weight, to submerge without external forces wouldn’t it need to displace less than it’s weight. Hence the specific gravity comment. :slight_smile:


#19

[QUOTE=southernX;19902]wait a sec, to float a submarine has to displace it’s weight, to submerge without external forces wouldn’t it need to displace less than it’s weight. Hence the specific gravity comment. :)[/QUOTE]

The displaced volume has to be more than 64.1 lbs per cubic foot to sink, and less than to float, more or less. Submarines’ ballast allows you to play around that number.


#20

Thinking too much about submarine hydrostatics can cause migraine headaches.