SSAS - What happens when you push the secret button?


#1

What happens when you press the secret button?

When a ship is … Click HERE to read the full blog article.


#2

Thank you for the article. I have linked to it in my blog.
Don
Maritime Vital Asset Protection, LLC


#3

This is good. I hope all shipping companies will avail of this technology especially with the uncontrolled piracy along the Horn of Africa and neighboring countries, the safety of the crew, cargo and ship must be a top priority. This safety protocol must be taken into consideration.


#4

It should also be noted that we, the USCG, also get the SSAS alerts- in fact, they just changed the responding office from PAC Area to LANT Area 24 hr Command Center. This also happens to be the same watch (and computer/desk) I sit in. So let it be known that when we get it, it doesn’t matter if the CSO’s drunk or not… 'cause we hyped up with coffee and ready to go! Cheers! :eek:


#5

Ryan,

Just to be clear, I wrote “routed only to the Company Security Officer and [I][B]the Flag[/B][/I]”. Does the USCG get any notice of SSAS alarms from non-US Flagged vessels? It certainly makes sense that they would receive the alarm when a (any) ship is in US waters, I’m just not sure if this is the case?


#6

isnt this idea already in place?

Why have a completely new system. Just put a Satellite system into a seperate area from the Bridge & have dedicated Ships Officer who have access (in the old days possibly the Radio Officer)

So if the Bridge is unaccessable, there is still a means of communicating?


#7

Actually we do receive notices from non-US flagged vsls; however, I’m fairly confident we don’t receive all of them.


#8

[QUOTE=darylwilkes;25814]isnt this idea already in place?

Why have a completely new system. Just put a Satellite system into a seperate area from the Bridge & have dedicated Ships Officer who have access (in the old days possibly the Radio Officer)

So if the Bridge is unaccessable, there is still a means of communicating?[/QUOTE]

Yes but the radio officer (or GMDSS operator as is usually the case) would still only be able to call one agency at a time and they are not experienced in what to ask for.

It’s kind of like 911. Yes you could put a spare telephone in your shed but, even if you could get to it in time, are you really going to want to call the police department and ambulance yourself? Or would you rather call just one number (911) and let them coordinate the response?


#9

these are important protocals to have figured out in case of a specific and highly localized emergency, but we should perhaps keep in mind that these SSAS emergencies are a tiny fraction of the actual emergencies encountered on ships today. A mariner is much more likely to die or be injured in a FIRE, CARGO (or related), or SLIP TRIP FALL incident, then by a situation which would require the activation of the SSAS.

a technical review of this incident data can be found in [U]The Econometrics of Maritime Safety[/U] by Dr. Sabine Knapp.