Offshore telephoto lens


#1

Anyone have an opinion on a good lens for offshore? A good all-purpose focal length range? I just got a Canon T1i and 2.8 24-70mm L lens - I’m just getting into photography and it seems like I need more zoom most of the time to get good pictures.

Any opinions??? Photographers??


#2

My experience is that for “Sailor Shooting” the Canon EF-S 55-250 is about right for offshore use. They’re about $250 on Amazon.

Throw a UV filter on it and off you go .

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-55-250mm-4-0-5-6-Telephoto-Digital/dp/B0011NVMO8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=photo&qid=1213406795&sr=1-1

I shoot a Canon 40D, and I stayed with Canon glass.

I’ve taken about 60000 photos in the last 3 years for sim area development work. I’m no pro photographer, as I but I do a know a bit about taking pictures from a moving ship under adverse conditions . . lol


#3

[quote=Captain Electron!!;21729]

I’ve taken about 60000 photos in the last 3 years for sim area development work. I’m no pro photographer, as I but I do a know a bit about taking pictures from a moving ship under adverse conditions . . lol[/quote]

I can vouch for his photos, they’re pretty good.


#4

go to www.kenrockwell.com and get all the best professional advice & info you could ask for about cameras & equipment.


#5

anchorman, glad to return the help

I have several cameras, semi-pro, you should look at the

sigma 70-200 mm f2.8 when you want more range add a 1.4 extender.

look at www.bhphotovideo.com in new york, they are one of the largest camera retailers and wholesaler in the world, they have several thousands lenses and cameras in stock from 20 dollar cameras to 120,000 dollar lenses…

the sigma is compatible with the canon L series lenses, with the extender you get longer range which turns the lens into a f4.0.

to give you an idea about my equipment I have over 15 different lenses and have 7 camera till a crack head stole 3 of them.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/533555-REG/Sigma_579_101_70_200mm_f_2_8_II_EX.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/390164-USA/Sigma_824101_1_4x_DG_EX_APO.html

get a UV polarizer and a lens protector. UV is about 60 dollars(cuts out the sun glare on the water and you can see through most windows without a glare. the lens protector protects the glass about 20 dollars, if you scratch the glass on the lens you mine as well buy a new lens, with the protector you just buy a new on for 20 dollars, make sure the UV polarizer is the type that turns.

any questions you can pm me or email me at captainken@chefken.com

just for your information I have had several photos of food and models published on various food products and skin care products

ken


#6

[quote=Mr 100-ton;21732]anchorman, glad to return the help

I have several cameras, semi-pro, you should look at the

sigma 70-200 mm f2.8 when you want more range add a 1.4 extender.

look at www.bhphotovideo.com in new york, they are one of the largest camera retailers and wholesaler in the world, they have several thousands lenses and cameras in stock from 20 dollar cameras to 120,000 dollar lenses…

the sigma is compatible with the canon L series lenses, with the extender you get longer range which turns the lens into a f4.0.

to give you an idea about my equipment I have over 15 different lenses and have 7 camera till a crack head stole 3 of them.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/555142-REG/Sigma_579107_70_200mm_f_2_8_II_EX.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/390164-USA/Sigma_824101_1_4x_DG_EX_APO.html

get a UV polarizer and a lens protector. UV is about 60 dollars(cuts out the sun glare on the water and you can see through most windows without a glare. the lens protector protects the glass about 20 dollars, if you scratch the glass on the lens you mine as well buy a new lens, with the protector you just buy a new on for 20 dollars, make sure the UV polarizer is the type that turns.

any questions you can pm me or email me at captainken@chefken.com

just for your information I have had several photos of food and models published on various food products and skin care products

ken[/quote]

Thanks. I have several filters for what I have. All Hoya, multi-coated, and circular polarized for the L lens that I have now. Having just got this stuff, I’m still learning, but one thing I know for sure - I need more focal length. The big question is the image stabilization on a vibrating boat and a decent focal length for capturing vessels or rigs from 3 miles out.
Seeing all of these great pictures kinda peaked my interest, so now I’ve made an investment, but need to add a good zoom for the pictures I want.

I’ll email you later after I do my morning paperwork ritual…I’m interest in a Sigma lens as well.

Thank’s for the input. Now I just need to get good taking pictures in manual modes.


#7

Santa’s bringing the Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Lens this year to compliment my Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM. They’re a lot pricier ($540 on Amazon) than the non-USM’s but the auto focus speed and Image Stabilization are great. My research on the 17-85mm found that many people buy the lower cost non-IS or non-USM lenses but then upgrade later on so I just spent the money up front and have been very happy with the result.


#8

the canon 70-300 4-5.6 is a good lens but in a low light situation the sigma 2.8 will fair better. anchor man, while in guam look at doing a couple of photo shoots. when was the last time you were surrounded with several women in bikinis all trying to outdo each other in there poses, wait till you do the sexy lingerie shoots, do a time for prints, you will make capt lee jealous…

f2.8 in my opinion is the way to go, you get the low light advantage without stepping down the f-stop on the camera with a better depth of field,

if you want to have some fun, buy a second camera, change the sensor into infrared and go to the beach, see through photos when someone is wearing a white bikini not that i have ever done that


#9

Hope to see you share some of the pix with us here on gcaptain.


#10

I agree with Mr 100 Ton the 2.8 is the way to go.I did a lot of research before I bought my lens last year. The Sigma and the Tamron 70-200 are similar I have been using a Tamron for a year and I am very happy with the performance. 2 to 3 miles away on a boat is tough. You called it with the vibration and the motion. When you zoom it doesn’t just magnify the picture but also the vibration.


#11

I’m pretty sure I’ll go with the f/2.8 70-200mm IS USM L lens. It’s pretty damn pricey, but with the 2X extender, I can make it a 140-400mm and lose 2 F-stops, so it will be a f/4.8…and not lose image stabilization in the process, this seems to be unique to the L lens extender. I guess you get what you pay for, and I don’t believe in buying the same thing twice. This seems like the most versatile set-up I found so far that will last for years with the weather sealing needed for offshore.
If someone has a cheaper idea, I’m listening.


#12

you should also consider a monopod, with a heavy lens this will help out with the stabilization of the lens, the l series lenses do not loose value, I have 3 of them that all went up 600 dollars retail 1 year after i bought them,

consider buying from B&H, they have great customer service and stand behind the products they sell, always return calls, the salesmen do not work on commission

spend some time on kenrockwell.com one of the best sites around for photo info


#13

[quote=Mr 100-ton;21732]anchorman, glad to return the help

I have several cameras, semi-pro, you should look at the

sigma 70-200 mm f2.8 when you want more range add a 1.4 extender.

look at www.bhphotovideo.com in new york, they are one of the largest camera retailers and wholesaler in the world, they have several thousands lenses and cameras in stock from 20 dollar cameras to 120,000 dollar lenses…

the sigma is compatible with the canon L series lenses, with the extender you get longer range which turns the lens into a f4.0.

to give you an idea about my equipment I have over 15 different lenses and have 7 camera till a crack head stole 3 of them.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/533555-REG/Sigma_579_101_70_200mm_f_2_8_II_EX.html

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/390164-USA/Sigma_824101_1_4x_DG_EX_APO.html

get a UV polarizer and a lens protector. UV is about 60 dollars(cuts out the sun glare on the water and you can see through most windows without a glare. the lens protector protects the glass about 20 dollars, if you scratch the glass on the lens you mine as well buy a new lens, with the protector you just buy a new on for 20 dollars, make sure the UV polarizer is the type that turns.

any questions you can pm me or email me at captainken@chefken.com

just for your information I have had several photos of food and models published on various food products and skin care products

ken[/quote]

Agree with all - Sigma’s are really good lenses.


#14

[quote=Mr 100-ton;21806]you should also consider a monopod, with a heavy lens this will help out with the stabilization of the lens, the l series lenses do not loose value, I have 3 of them that all went up 600 dollars retail 1 year after i bought them,

consider buying from B&H, they have great customer service and stand behind the products they sell, always return calls, the salesmen do not work on commission

spend some time on kenrockwell.com one of the best sites around for photo info[/quote]

I’ll jump in with a quick comment - I have a mono-pod, but I never use it onboard - It brings too much deck vibration up to the camera, and makes it hard to aim on a moving target. I just stand / point / shoot, and let the IS and AF do their thing . . Even at a high-telephoto, these modern cameras are so good that they do most of the work for you. I have custom settings for various lighting situations, and I bracket shoot if needed, but that’s about it. I do use a tripod for doing night shots of course, but from onboard, it’s more a case of learning how to hold the camera steady . . I shot competetive rifle in high school as well as when I was in the CG, so I find that to be quite helpful:p

My days of shooting pictures normally consist of something like standing on the top of the WH of a pushboat going down the Ohio River at 7 kts, and shooting constantly for 10 hours while swatting mosquitos and trying not to broil . .

I NEVER take pictures on vacation, and anyone who asks to see my vacation pictures gets to see about 30gb of pictures of riverbank . .


#15

Unless you are shooting at night and low light situations, getting a lens with a lower fstop (ala 2.8) may not really be necessary. If it is zoom you are after, then save some bucks and go for the focal length. I have shot a some shipping around Houston with a 70-300 5.4 and have had good luck with it, including some here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cmakin/archives/date-taken/2006/08/05/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cmakin/archives/date-taken/2006/08/04/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cmakin/archives/date-taken/2006/10/14/

If I were to spend money on a lens for shooting offshore, I would put it into focal length and vibration reduction.

That said, I do have a 70-200 2.8 VR, but I use it for my side business of shooting dirt track racing at night.


#16

Anchorman,
Welcome to the fun of taking great photos. There was previous mention of monopods, for and against… let me relate that when using a relatively inexpensive tripod on Laurence M. Gould, while breaking ice, my photos were extremely sharp, even when zooming in on subjects. The vibration on Gould while in ice was the most I’ve encountered and I was thrilled with the difference the tripod made from shooting offhand or when using a handrail, door frame, etc. to steady the camera. Good luck.