Is rail transport threatening shipping?:

Containers by rail from China to Europe vv. is gaining in volume:


But maybe Europe can ween itself off Chinese products?:

I may be wrong, but ships/barges on a mile per dollar basis of cargo tonnage transported have had an advantage. Something new here?

Rail across two continents is cheaper than air transport and faster that ships via Suez.

PS> Tug/barge and ATBs are out.

It looks like someone was weaned off a dictionary a bit early.

ween
/wēn/
verb
archaic
verb: ween ; 3rd person present: weens ; past tense: weened ; past participle: weened ; gerund or present participle: weening

  1. be of the opinion; think or suppose.
    “he, I ween, is no sacred personage”

wean
/wēn/
verb
verb: wean ; 3rd person present: weans ; past tense: weaned ; past participle: weaned ; gerund or present participle: weaning

  1. accustom (an infant or other young mammal) to food other than its mother’s milk.
  • accustom (someone) to managing without something on which they have become dependent or of which they have become excessively fond.

“the doctor tried to wean her off the sleeping pills”

  • be strongly influenced by (something), especially from an early age.

“I was weaned on a regular diet of Hollywood fantasy”

There is so much rail traffic from China to Europe it is causing congestion at the China and Kazakhstan border.

Also a lot more cargo is being shifted by truck. That volume will only increase as truck shipments get much cheaper if they ever get around to finally implementing these long self-driving trucks that have been spoken about for years.

https://www.lloydsloadinglist.com/freight-directory/news/China-Europe-truck-options-thriving-as-air-rates-soar/76702.htm

pedant

Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ped·ant

(pĕd′nt)

n.

1. One who ostentatiously exhibits academic knowledge or who pays undue attention to minor details or formal rules.

2. Obsolete A schoolmaster.

[French pédant or Italian pedante (French, from Italian), possibly from Vulgar Latin *paedēns, *paedent-, present participle of *paedere, to instruct , probably from Greek paideuein, from pais, paid-, child ; see pedo- 2.]

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pedant

(ˈpɛdənt)

n

1. a person who relies too much on academic learning or who is concerned chiefly with insignificant detail

2. (Education) archaic a schoolmaster or teacher

[C16: via Old French from Italian pedante teacher; perhaps related to Latin paedagōgus pedagogue]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ped•ant

(ˈpɛd nt)

Just one who holds a publisher to what should be a minimal standard. If one is going to criticize reporters and publishers for lack of knowledge about arcane maritime industry matters as we do here so often it is not pedantic to at least expect them to know the difference between two words with widely differing meanings.

I am sorry you are willing to accept the dumbing down of publishing and reportage and choose instead to attempt to insult those of us who still maintain a higher standard.

The Belt and Road initiative is working as planned

Lots of possibilities:
In Scottish English Wean means; a young child.

Words matter. All these years I thought a goblet was a small goblin. I just found out it’s a cup.
Now I have to go back and read that stupid King Arthur book all over again.

3 Likes

Do they keep Shetland ponies in a wee bairn?

No they don’t keep anything in a wee bairn:

Lang may yer lum leek.

So is a gobling a large bird or a small goblet?

Should that read; “leek” or “reek”??

Scottish Glossary for those specially interested:
https://stooryduster.co.uk/scottish-words-glossary/index.html

Yes, it should be reek.