How to study and test

I learned alot from searching this forum but it does not tell me how you study and the best order for 3rd mate. I can leave my job and live at home rent free for a year and still pay what little bills I have.

I have the books and the hawsepipe USB dongle for 3rd mate unlimited. What’s the best way to study? Read one book per day take 1 test at noon read some more take another test before you go to sleep next day do book 2 and so fourth and so on or read two books per day or all the books each day? What is the best way to retain the information?

What is the best order to take the tests in?

Did you study hard on 4 tests then fail 2 tests so you could study hard 2 tests on the second pass that way you have a better chance of passing.

How many rounds do you get because nmc says 2 rounds but mates say 3?

[QUOTE=Menizzi;164147]I learned alot from searching this forum but it does not tell me how you study and the best order for 3rd mate. I can leave my job and live at home rent free for a year and still pay what little bills I have.

I have the books and the hawsepipe USB dongle for 3rd mate unlimited. What’s the best way to study? Read one book per day take 1 test at noon read some more take another test before you go to sleep next day do book 2 and so fourth and so on or read two books per day or all the books each day? What is the best way to retain the information?

What is the best order to take the tests in?

Did you study hard on 4 tests then fail 2 tests so you could study hard 2 tests on the second pass that way you have a better chance of passing.

How many rounds do you get because nmc says 2 rounds but mates say 3?[/QUOTE]

Judging by your exacting prose I’d say you are pretty close to being qualified already. But the best way I’ve found to study, is to get a quarter pound of meth, as close to pure as you can get. You will need a case of Gatorade, and probably some downers for when it gets too intense. And then just do lines for about a week, staying up studying the whole time. Then you should be ready to face the bright glass booth that is the REC. Good luck.

great plan, except usually booze and hookers come along with the meth…then you won’t be able to concentrate on studying.

To the OP, you gotta do what’s best for you. For me personally, concentrating on one module at a time works good for me. Once I get proficient at one, move on. Lots of folks will say you don’t need to worry about the 70% modules much. I don’t agree with that. Good to have practice looking things up.
I don’t have your level of license so maybe someone that holds the level you are going for will chime in. I will say lapware was great so possibly add that to your study materials.

You study to pass everything on the first try. If you happen to fail a module it should be because you saw questions you have never seen before; any other reason and maybe you should re-evaluate your dedication to getting a license. Sounds like you really don’t take it too seriously.

You should study at least a couple of hours a day for a couple of months supplemented by a week or two of nonstop studying with no distractions. If that’s too much to ask then once again, you’re really not that dedicated. Who has time to fail and re-test? Not me.

Most people are better off taking courses. It is often faster, easier, and cheaper (time is money).
It’s good to study before the course. Lapware is very helpful.

Read the rules of the road a couple of times and then use Lapware to practice questions until you getting at least a 95 all the time. Then move on to the next topic, but do at least one rules of the road test first everyday. That will keep you sharp on the rules, and getting a good score on a test is great confidence booster as you start to study the next topic. A course may provide some helpful tricks and nuemonic devises for the rules, but you really have to learn rules by hammering them yourself. T-Nav and C-Nav are the only difficult modules. I suggest that you save those for last.

Well,

I only ask because one of the AB that took his test said he did the pass 4 fail 2 so that he could study hard on the last 2 so it was not study hard for all 6 at one time. But i think you guys are right i should shoot to pass all 6 the first time. i will be leaving my job to study full time for about 5 months before i take classes.

[QUOTE=Menizzi;164212]Well,

I only ask because one of the AB that took his test said he did the pass 4 fail 2 so that he could study hard on the last 2 so it was not study hard for all 6 at one time. But i think you guys are right i should shoot to pass all 6 the first time. i will be leaving my job to study full time for about 5 months before i take classes.[/QUOTE]

That’s another strategy…

Most people, including myself, psych themselves out. You have to pass four to not start over completely. so if you go in to the test room with confidence that you can at least get four out of six, then you have the 90 days to knock out the other two. Keep in mind how many days you have left on your approval letter if you end up doing things this way.

Taking off work for 5 months to study is way overkill for most folks, but whatever floats your boat. You may need more time and thats ok too.

Most folks at the academies study for 2-4 hours a day starting 3 months out, maybe even 2 months out, and then study hard 6-8 hours a day , for the last 14 or so days before the testing date. Its a tried and true method that has worked for countless people. Think about giving it a try.

And know how to use the reference material. You can save a shit load of time and not study things you can look up.

Best advice in this thread. Knowing how to use reference material like the CFR’s is really the point. Just memorizing multiple choice questions isn’t going to do anything for you down the road. Knowing your way around the CFR’s and Bowditch will.

Five months! Without pay! That’s $30,000 or more! Why waste all that time and money? You can learn most of it while you are at sea and getting paid. That makes $5000 worth of exam prep classes look pretty cheap.

Of course you also need to spend 10 to 12 weeks and $30,000 on STCW courses before your new 3rd mate license will be valid offshore.

Like tugsailor says study on the boat. Then take a few weeks off to study intensively or hire a tutor for your problem areas.

yeah, i know its hard but maybe 5 months is over kill. 2nd mate told me his prep was 13 weeks.

I took a month off to prep for my latest test, which I take next week. My last test, same thing, took a month off, then booked a hotel room, went down and took the test.

How did I do it? Read a few chapters of a particular subject per day (the NMC has a bibliography for deck and engine) and then spent the rest of the day taking practice tests.

Rinse and repeat until my practice test scores were consistently in the 80’s and 90’s. I take practice tests fast but in the testing room I slow down and take my time.

You need to really have a grasp of the material. It’s not about memorizing questions- although we all know that some of the questions are really goofy! But if you know your basics, you can at least make an educated guess.

I also practice math problems intensely for a day or two (that’s about as much as I can stand).

Then I drive there and get it done. You are talking about what, 5 months? I don’t think you’ll need that much, unless you plan to take some courses.