How can I work on american vessels?

i live now in egypt … i have 6 months sea experience as third officer … I’m non a american with a Non-american Certificate of competency,how can I work on american vessels? [B]I already hold marine navigation certificate issued by another country[/B][B][B](egypt country )[/B]. How can I obtain a merican certificate? i heard about [/B]
The Seafarers Harry Lundeberg School of Seamanship is it possible to join there ? how about chances working in good company with current certificate ? i see it so difficult isnt it ? please i want someone to reply .

you need to be a citizen of America

^ That, but if you don’t believe us go and look at the US Coast Guard, National Mariner Center website and take a look at the checklists to apply for a US 3rd mate license

You can get a USCG 6 pac (OUPV). That’s about it, but you still can’t sail on American vessels. It’s in the Marine Safety Manual.

[I]4. Citizenship.
No certificate of registry of license other than Operator of Uninspected Passenger Vessels
(OUPV) may be issued to anyone who is not a citizen of the United States. OUPV licenses
issued to non-U.S. Citizens must be limited to uninspected vessels not documented under
the laws of the United States. Refer to the non-citizen notation in section “P.8” of this
chapter for the proper wording. 46 CFR 10.205© discusses proof of citizenship[/I]

Or you can read the CFR that it references. I think the Marine Safety Manual is easier. That’s on page 35.

I’ve heard if you run across the U.S. Mexican border you will be a citizen… do it fast before they take amnesty away. With the benefits, you may not even need to sail!

You don’t have to be an American to work on American vessel as long as it is termed an OFFSHORE vessel and operating ONLY outside the US.
Your license has to satisfy the Marine Authorities in the county(s) where the vessel is operating.
I.e. in Egypt your Egyptian license should be OK. (Other places to, as long as it is STCW’10 compliant)

I don’t know if there are any US requirements, or whatever those may be, other then that the Master holds an American passport, but that doesn’t apply to you.

If you want to work within US waters, the situation changes and work permit (Green card) or other immigration arrangements applies.
It is then also a question whether your license will be recognized or not.

[QUOTE=ombugge;172998]You don’t have to be an American to work on American vessel as long as it is termed an OFFSHORE vessel and operating ONLY outside the US.
Your license has to satisfy the Marine Authorities in the county(s) where the vessel is operating.
I.e. in Egypt your Egyptian license should be OK. (Other places to, as long as it is STCW’10 compliant)

I don’t know if there are any US requirements, or whatever those may be, other then that the Master holds an American passport, but that doesn’t apply to you.

If you want to work within US waters, the situation changes and work permit (Green card) or other immigration arrangements applies.
It is then also a question whether your license will be recognized or not.[/QUOTE]

We had another Egyptian guy here who was a real pistol, so to speak…claimed to be big shot in the Egyptian Navy and wanted to know why he couldn’t waltz right on in and get his US Master’s license as if the world owed him a favor. He was duly run off.

OP has to be a US citizen to serve as a licensed officer here on US vessels. And…he’ll have to start from scratch earning a US license.

OP also will need a green card to obtain a US mariner document and work as unlicensed.

We aren’t quite ready to give away the whole store, not without a fight, anyway. Although there are plenty of those in high (and low) places who are trying.

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[QUOTE=Lone_Star;172980]I’ve heard if you run across the U.S. Mexican border you will be a citizen… do it fast before they take amnesty away. With the benefits, you may not even need to sail![/QUOTE]

He can always get a great job as a baggage handler. I hear the boys from Sharm El Sheikh are a blast to work with.

Catherder:

“He can always get a great job as a baggage handler. I hear the boys from Sharm El Sheikh are a blast to work with.”

Bravo Catherder. Good show!

[QUOTE=catherder;173031]he’ll have to start from scratch earning a US license.[/QUOTE]

Not quite. He won’t be handed a 3rd Mate license just because he has an Egyptian one but his previous sea time doesn’t cease to exist. Though, all his STCW training won’t count since it isn’t USCG approved.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;173099]Not quite. He won’t be handed a 3rd Mate license just because he has an Egyptian one but his previous sea time doesn’t cease to exist. Though, all his STCW training won’t count since it isn’t USCG approved.[/QUOTE]

Are not USA a signatory of the STCW code?

Yes, however I really doubt the original poster took his courses at USCG approved schools. It does not matter if Seaman Smith took their courses at the ‘best’ academy in Egypt. They would count for naught here in the US.

[QUOTE=cappy208;173102]Yes, however I really doubt the original poster took his courses at USCG approved schools. It does not matter if Seaman Smith took their courses at the ‘best’ academy in Egypt. They would count for naught here in the US.[/QUOTE]

As a signatory you have to approve all other signatories STCW training, that’s the point of STCW.

[QUOTE=Kraken;173104]As a signatory you have to approve all other signatories STCW training, that’s the point of STCW.[/QUOTE]

No, that’s not true. The recognition procedures are not that simple. It differs for officers vice ratings, but it’s not a one for all and the U.S. has no agreement with Egypt, or anyone for that matter.

[QUOTE=Kraken;173104]As a signatory you have to approve all other signatories STCW training, that’s the point of STCW.[/QUOTE]

No you don’t and I don’t think that’s stated anywhere as being the point of STCW.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;173114]No you don’t and I don’t think that’s stated anywhere as being the point of STCW.[/QUOTE]

Yes, I was rather hasty with the comment. STCW is a minimum requirement on national training. My bad :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=Jamesbrown;173105]No, that’s not true. The recognition procedures are not that simple. It differs for officers vice ratings, but it’s not a one for all and the U.S. has no agreement with Egypt, or anyone for that matter.[/QUOTE]

If no US recognition of ANY foreign STCW’10 CoC for service on US flag ships, does that mean that USCG issued STCW’10 CoCs are NOT recognized by any other countries? (These things are usually reciprocal)

PS> I’m ASKING not implying anything. I genuinely don’t know.

[QUOTE=ombugge;173132]If no US recognition of ANY foreign STCW’10 CoC for service on US flag ships, does that mean that USCG issued STCW’10 CoCs are NOT recognized by any other countries? (These things are usually reciprocal)

PS> I’m ASKING not implying anything. I genuinely don’t know.[/QUOTE]

https://www.sjofartsdir.no/en/guides/recognition-of-foreign-certificates-of-competency-for-maritime-personnel-on-norwegian-ships-in-accordance-with-regulation-i10-of-the-stcw-convention/

[QUOTE=ombugge;173132]If no US recognition of ANY foreign STCW’10 CoC for service on US flag ships, does that mean that USCG issued STCW’10 CoCs are NOT recognized by any other countries? (These things are usually reciprocal)

PS> I’m ASKING not implying anything. I genuinely don’t know.[/QUOTE]

One must have USCG issued credentials to work on almost all US flag vessels. I think there might be provisions note for the USCG to issue a CoE for foreign licenses from certain countries for service on the few vessels where that is acceptable.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;173146]One must have USCG issued credentials to work on almost all US flag vessels. I think there might be provisions note for the USCG to issue a CoE for foreign licenses from certain countries for service on the few vessels where that is acceptable.[/QUOTE]

Thanks. That make sense and is according to how it works with most other Flag States that is IMO members.
But it doesn’t answer my question about acceptance of US CoCs by other countries.

I believe that all the FoC registers defacto controlled from the US, such as Liberia, Vanuatu, Marshall islands etc. does readily issue CoE based on US STCW’10 compliant CoCs, (in fact I know they do) but if the US is selective with what national CoCs they will approve, I imagine that those countries not approved may reciprocate, especially European countries.

For countries like China, Russia etc. this is probably not a major issue, since there are few Americans likely to apply.

There are Chinese rigs working in other countries however, among them in Norway, Australia and New Zealand. (There was one working in Mexico before, but no more)

I was on one in Darwin, Australia, were there were three Captains (OIM), one Chinese for the Owners, one Australian because the Australians required it and one Brit from Maersk Drilling, who were managing the rig. For the tow from China to Darwin there was also a Tow Master from Maersk, just to make it complete.(All Master Mariners) The Chinese was the defacto “Master” though.

I don’t know if China would have approved of an American CoC holder in this “flock”, unless the US also accept Chinese issued CoCs.

The moral of the story?? The more restrictions is put on foreign nationals, the more restrictions you are likely to be met with in foreign lands.

[QUOTE=Jamesbrown;173133]https://www.sjofartsdir.no/en/guides/recognition-of-foreign-certificates-of-competency-for-maritime-personnel-on-norwegian-ships-in-accordance-with-regulation-i10-of-the-stcw-convention/[/QUOTE]

Thanks for that. That answers whether US STCW’10 CoC holders can be employed on ships under NIS register:

In addition, a unilateral agreement has been entered into to allow seamen with certificates issued in the U.S. to serve on board vessels registered in the Norwegian International Ship Register.

It also answer whether Norwegian CoC holders (they are ALL STCW compliant) can serve on US flag ships. They cannot.

Obviously this is a rule that has come into force with the STCW convention, as I have served on US flagged OSVs back in 1970.
I know of several others that did so, at least as late as in the 1980s, when I was rig mover for US owned and operated rigs in West Africa and worked with US flag boats, some of which had Norwegian Mates and Engineers.
Most of the boats had only US Master, the rest an international bunch.

Or are there different rules for OSVs working exclusively outside US waters, as has been implied here earlier?
Can anybody confirm or debunk that once and for all?