Good books to read


#1

I am a recent Great Lakes Maritime academy graduate and I was wondering if there were any other good to read tech books about Hydraulics, Diesel theory and other engineering handbooks. The ones we were told to get were not very good and was curious what the other academy cadets had for books and what some of the “old timers” used to get a nice foundation.

I have a good understanding of it all but just want to sharpen my knowledge a little more now that I am in the industry. Thanks in advance.


#2

[quote=givemeprops;21895]I am a recent Great Lakes Maritime academy graduate and I was wondering if there were any other good to read tech books about Hydraulics, Diesel theory and other engineering handbooks. The ones we were told to get were not very good and was curious what the other academy cadets had for books and what some of the “old timers” used to get a nice foundation.

I have a good understanding of it all but just want to sharpen my knowledge a little more now that I am in the industry. Thanks in advance.[/quote]

[B]Here is quick link to “Engines,Propulsion” under [I]Smart Search[/I] @ Professional Mariner you can always print some and take with if you don’t have internet. Articles and Mags are more portable too.[/B]

[B]Also, check with local Seafarer’s Ministry for donated publications, they can be very resourceful, lots of contacts there.[/B]

[B]I’m sure you will be getting some excellent feedback here soon. Don’t know where you live so I can suggest anyplace specific, for a visit or reference. Congrads on smart-start and sounds like a good attitude. :)[/B]


#3

Check out IMarEST out of the UK. They have a good selection of books. Marine Low Speed Diesel Engines by Denis Griffiths is very good, particularly for those who haven’t worked on a slow speed engine plant. The book is part of the MEP Series - other books in the series cover topics as: Medium Speed Engines (Pielstick, MaK, etc), Auxiliary Equipment, Generators, etc. While I only own the slow speed book, I have heard the others are good as well. Prices are reasonable (maybe £25/book) and they are softcover, slightly smaller than a normal American book - perfect for stuffing in the sea bag. A former cadet from GLMA gave me his refrigeration book…hardcover, fairly thick, color pics…that is good, keep it! Let me find my electrical book I used…it isn’t shipboard specific, bought it at Borders, but it does an awesome job for troubleshooting. Some of the best books I learned from had nothing to do with ship’s equipment! It gets confusing when dealing with grounded circuits, etc., but common sense figures it out. Testing a PCB is still the same on a ship or in the back of Radio Shack…

Are you going to work on the lakes or oceans?


#4

Thanks you two for the answers, I am currently working as an Engineer for a tug company in Detroit and possibly going to take over as fleet engineer next year. I did not get a refer. book while in the academy so I will have to look that one up.