Foreign flag vessel Siem Stringray

I’m work in the Gulf of Mexico at a rig that has the Siem Stringray (foreign flag vessel) acting as a floatel and floating storage. How is it possible that the oil companies are getting waivers for these foreign vessels when we have over 100 vessels tied up in the GOM. You can’t tell me that HOS doesn’t have a boat that could do the exact same thing and keep US Mariners employed. Who’s jobs is it to monitor the activities of the foreign vessels to ensure they are not breaking the Jones act.

They are not hauling cargo so it’s legal by the Jones Act. Most of the oil companies are
based in foreign countries and don’t give a shit about US Mariners not working.

It seems that host company sentiment is they’re less willing to tolerate it quietly now though, no?

They’re not violating the Jones Act but I believe the OCS Act requires American crews. If they don’t have Americans then they got a waiver to use foreign crews.

[QUOTE=Hey;184182]I’m work in the Gulf of Mexico at a rig that has the Siem Stringray (foreign flag vessel) acting as a floatel and floating storage. How is it possible that the oil companies are getting waivers for these foreign vessels when we have over 100 vessels tied up in the GOM. You can’t tell me that HOS doesn’t have a boat that could do the exact same thing and keep US Mariners employed. Who’s jobs is it to monitor the activities of the foreign vessels to ensure they are not breaking the Jones act.[/QUOTE]
I’m surprised, how can it be economical to use vessel like this as “Floatel and Storage” only, especially in the benign waters of the GOM?: www.subsea7.com/content/dam/subsea7/documents/.../fleet/.../Siem%20Stingray.pdf

As said, there are hundreds of idle US flag vessels available in the area, so there have to be more to it than that.
The question of Jones Act has been replied by others. It is not an issue here.

You say that you work on a rig, but do not specify what type and were. (Area, Deep water etc.)

  • Is it a Drilling rig, or some other description? (Floatel required for a drilling rig is not a frequent occurrence)
  • Is it in deep water and the “floatel” working on DP, with a (telescopic?) gangway attached?
  • Are there any special requirement, like accommodation standard, special material storage etc.
  • Are they occasionally required to use the ROVs and/or AHC crane, or whatever?

There are of cause some idle US flag vessel with these capabilities but, if so, the number of suitable vessels would be less. Besides, they may not be any more economical in use.

I’m curious. I know that foreign “Floatels” has been used during hook-up and maintenance of deep water GOM Fields, but this one is not a purpose built “Floatel”, even though it has capacity for 75-80 pers. + Marine & Catering Crew.

[QUOTE=Hey;184182]I’m work in the Gulf of Mexico at a rig that has the Siem Stringray (foreign flag vessel) acting as a floatel and floating storage. How is it possible that the oil companies are getting waivers for these foreign vessels when we have over 100 vessels tied up in the GOM. You can’t tell me that HOS doesn’t have a boat that could do the exact same thing and keep US Mariners employed. Who’s jobs is it to monitor the activities of the foreign vessels to ensure they are not breaking the Jones act.[/QUOTE]

I say over and over and over again that if the US offshore companies won’t fight this then it needs to be the mariners who are losing the jobs and the only way the mariners can fight this is to unite in a professional association to combine their resources. Personally, I want to see HOS file a suit in Federal Court in New Orleans and I have offered my considerable knowledge on this matter and my services to them to draft their complaint but they have not accepted, however the offer remains open…(hint, hint Fraq)

[QUOTE=ombugge;184450]I know that foreign “Floatels” has been used during hook-up and maintenance of deep water GOM Fields, but this one is not a purpose built “Floatel”, even though it has capacity for 75-80 pers. + Marine & Catering Crew.[/QUOTE]

Just the berthing space necessary to be usable as a flotel is very rare in the domestic fleet. Chouest’s Island boats in their unlimited fleet would work but how many others?

[QUOTE=ombugge;184450]I’m surprised, how can it be economical to use vessel like this as “Floatel and Storage” only, especially in the benign waters of the GOM?: www.subsea7.com/content/dam/subsea7/documents/…/fleet/…/Siem%20Stingray.pdf

As said, there are hundreds of idle US flag vessels available in the area, so there have to be more to it than that.
The question of Jones Act has been replied by others. It is not an issue here.

[/QUOTE]

Vessel is chartered to Subsea 7 which has a three year “life-of-field” frame agreement with BP for IRM and other ops in the GoM:
http://gcaptain.com/subsea-7-wins-work-bp-gulf-mexico/

BP is likely using this vessel for floatel because they already have it under contract.

[QUOTE=SomeGuy;184566]Vessel is chartered to Subsea 7 which has a three year “life-of-field” frame agreement with BP for IRM and other ops in the GoM:
http://gcaptain.com/subsea-7-wins-work-bp-gulf-mexico/

BP is likely using this vessel for floatel because they already have it under contract.[/QUOTE]

Ah, Siem Offshore and Subsea 7 have close “family ties”.

Siem Offshore AS:

Kristian Siem (born 1949), Board member
Mr. Siem is chairman of Siem Industries Inc., Subsea 7 S.A. and Siem Industrikapital AB and a director of Siem Shipping Inc., Flensburger Schiffbau-Gesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, North Atlantic Smaller Companies Investment Trust plc. and NKT Holding A/S. Mr. Siem is a Norwegian citizen.

Subsea 7:

KRISTIAN SIEM
CHAIRMAN
Mr Siem became Chairman of the Board of Directors of Subsea 7 in January 2011, prior to which he was Chairman of the Board of Directors of Subsea 7 Inc. from January 2002. Mr Siem has a degree in Business Economics and has been active in the oil and gas industry since 1972. Mr Siem is the Chairman of Siem Industries Inc. and Vice Chairman of NKT Holding A/S. Mr Siem is a Director of Siem Offshore Inc., Siem Shipping Inc. (formerly Star Reefers Inc.), North Atlantic Smaller Companies Investment Trust plc and Frupor S.A. Past directorships include Kvaerner ASA and Transocean Inc.
Mr Siem is a Norwegian citizen.

BP E&P Inc.:

BP has more lease blocks than any other company — covering an area roughly equal in size to Connecticut — and, over the past decade, the company has been the deepwater gulf’s single biggest investor.
BP operates four large production platforms (Atlantis, Thunder Horse, Mad Dog and Na Kika) and holds interests in four non-operated hubs (Mars, Mars B, Ursa and Great White).

The “Rig” in question is most likely working on one of the above large production platforms. Somebody with AIS covering GOM can probably pinpoint which one.