Fast Rescue Craft / Rescue Craft / MOB boats / Designated Rescue Boats

Dyson class. This one?:
https://www.omao.noaa.gov/learn/marine-operations/ships/oscar-dyson

I see it has a workboat “hidden” in a recess.
Don’t know if it is equipped with Vestdavit for launch / recovery but NOAA has a long term contract for service with NOAA:

Is this definition correct?

It more or less follows function (rescue) and type (light boat).

From the same source, more on the “type” of boat:

The boat may be of either rigid or inflated construction or a combination of both. Usually, it is a semi-rigid structure with the inflated chambers of an upper sponson and an outboard engine.

As someone that has been pleasure boating their whole life, some of the worst designed boats along with the most dangerous systems of launching and retrieving are to be found in shipping, thats for sure.
We called life boats death boats on our rig and low an behold one rig in the fleet killed 2 people with one just to prove it.

A davit-launched, motor-propelled light boat provided to perform man-overboard retrieval and raft marshalling duties. The boat may be of either rigid or inflated construction or a combination of both. Usually, it is a semi-rigid structure with the inflated chambers of an upper sponson and an outboard engine.

This definition seems correct as far as it goes but it’s generic. SOLAS uses the term “Rescue Boat” in a specific, defined way.

Conflating the two definitions just leads to confusion.

I repeat:

Most people are able to handle two terms used for the same thing, especially when both are self-explanatory.

There are many example of this in the maritime vocabulary used around the world. Many have been discussed on this forum before.

I call a complete vessel a Ship, while the “body” of that ship is the Hull.
Some appears to confuse the matter by calling a ship a hull.
(Finance people even call it “an asset”)

Some even use “Left and Right” when they mean “Port a Starboard”. Confusing.

PS> That is why there is such thing as “Standard Maritime English”:

This is taught in Maritime Schools worldwide to avoid confusion when ships of different nationalities meet and seafarers communicate in English.