East coast tug and barge employment question

Can someone please name a few tug and barg companies on the east coast that will hire a OS and that has a 14/14 rotation? Also what companies out there will pay for or atleast help with the costs of training and travel as you move your way up from an OS? Any info would realy be helpful

thank you

Hello Max:
I worked at Weeks Marine in Cranford New Jersey for awhile. They will hire Ordinary Seamen, but the schedule is a 28/28 rotation. They will help you with your upgrade as well as pay for all travel to and from the tug. I also worked for Hornbeck Offshore Services tug fleet out of Brooklyn, NY. The rotation there is a 21/21 and they will also help with your upgrade. All travel expences are paid for as well. The neat thing about Hornbeck when I was there was that there was no set limit on grub, so you could get whatever the hell you wanted as far as food and coffee goes. You are on your own with tobacco products. If you havent been on a tug before, be careful the tug industry is nothing to sneeze at. It can be quite dangerous at times, I wont go into details to scare you away from it though. Just use common sense and you will be o.k.
Welcome to the sea life !!

Here’s a short (not all inclusive list) off the top of my head. In no particular order, with no observations or recommendations of reputation, pay or OS employability.

And although they may start out saying they are 14/14, some will not let you go until a relief shows up, which may or may not be when you expect it. some are 7/7. some are 21/21.

Boston Towing and Transportation, Boston
Bouchard Transportation, Everywhere
Dann Ocean Towing, Tampa
Dann Towing, Chesapeake City MD
DonJon Marine, New Jersey
Foss/Constellation Towing, Boston
Fournier Towing, Portland and Providence
Gateway, New Haven
Interstate Navigation, New London
Ksea, Staten Island
McAllister, Almost every east coast Port
Moran, Ditto
Reinauer, Staten Island
SeaBoats, Warren RI
Vane Brothers, Baltimore
Weeks, New Jersey
Wilmington tugs, Wilmington DE
Krause, Baltimore

A point to remember is that both Mcallister and Moran have seperate hiring in most ports, with intermingling of crews from all ports. Sort of confusing, but once they hire you on you are subject to being sent anywhere they need you on any boat out of any port they operate from.

Starting out, you will undoubtedly have to make concessions as to a work schedule. You can’t be too picky and choosy. Take whatever job is offered. It is a resume builder. If you are able, knock around the ports near you, and ask the guys on the docks (provided you can get near them with all the homeland security regs.)

You’re in Buffalo. Why not try the great lakes companies for the summer? NOW would be the time to look there!!! Ice is gone, things are moving.

Was Weeks local 25?

If you could please do go into details I’m very interested to know every little thing there is to know about this type of career good or bad, I dont want any surprises. I am doing a week long orientation class in Chesapeake bay for people who have no experience and just starting off and I’m sure I’ll get all sorts of info but I would also like to get as much first hand experience of other people on the tugs as I can before I make a decision on this career change. And thank you for the info on the rotation schedule for those employers you mentioned but I realy could not be gone for any longer than 14 days. I know I shouldnt be picky but that would just be way to long being away from home.

Rick: If you could please do go into details I’m very interested to know every little thing there is to know about this type of career good or bad, I dont want any surprises. I am doing a week long orientation class in Chesapeake bay for people who have no experience and just starting off and I’m sure I’ll get all sorts of info but I would also like to get as much first hand experience of other people on the tugs as I can before I make a decision on this career change. And thank you for the info on the rotation schedule for those employers you mentioned but I realy could not be gone for any longer than 14 days. I know I shouldnt be picky but that would just be way to long being away from home.

Cappy: that realy worries me about being stuck if your relief dont show up. How often does that happen? is there anything you could do to get out of it? Is the extra time overtime pay?

This may not be the right industry for you. Being away from home is the hallmark of the maritime industry. I’m not saying it can’t be done. There are day jobs and short time jobs out there but those jobs either don’t pay well or you will be in hard competition against guys with far more experience than you.

Late reliefs happen and you are bound to remain, “until properly relieved.” Your options in that case are usually to quit or suck it up.

As mentioned, in this economy with hundreds of qualified applicants, You may not be able to be so ‘picky.’ You are an introductory level, inexperienced, new hire. The companies have their pick of who to hire. As Deckape mentioned earlier, if you are at the right place, at the right time you may get lucky. But you need to get out there and take ANY job at this young point in your career.

The reward in this career is NOT 14 days on,[U][B] but the whole 14 days off[/B][/U] (or whatever schedule you have) Think of it as time spent investing in your future. You may have to suck it up, and put up with longer hitches until you actually have a reputation to market to either the company you work for, or others you may move to to get a shorter schedule.

Some of the companies I mentioned earlier work 14/14. Some don’t. But you (as a newbie) will NOT have such an easy time competing with experienced deckhands for the ‘primo’ jobs. A couple of other factors enter into the equation. Some companies pay less, or have shitty benefits. Thus, you may get on at one company on a 14/14 schedule, but it will be inferior to others. But… you are not really equal to the competition… yet. Time (while employed) will let you move ‘up’ to be the experienced guy who can move to a better company.

Sounds like your best bet would be with a small day work company like a construction outfit moving derrick barges or something like a ferry that is day work only, just my 2 cents.

Don’t forget to look into GTugs on the Great Lakes. they have at least one boat assigned to Buffalo iirc. Its more of an “oncall” sort of gig.

It seems like there are a lot of guys looking to get into this industry but only if they can have it perfect (14/14, paid travel 400 a day). If your new, and especially in this economy, you take what you can and build from there.

I can only dream of a 14/14, good pay, good benefits, paid travel, paid training, guaranteed no late reliefs job and I’ve been in the industry for twelve years! Those greenhorns will have to compete against the likes of me for those jobs! Good luck Haha!

exactly what i was thinking deckape

I just want a nice boat and paid travel and I can’t find that

Hell, at this point I just want to continue working. These guys that want everything perfect must already be independently wealthy. lol

I am new to the commercial (tug) side of the industry. I am a charter fishing guy but I cant make it during slow season with the new baby, it was hard last year, will not be possible this year. Time to get out before I piss on my nuts. I can continue my charter business on a smaller scale on my “off” days. I have no unrealistic expectations out of the industry, I will work 28/28 or 32/14, whatevernthehell. All I have is a 100GT near coastal master, STCW-95, TWIC & a passport. Do you think I can get a job as an OS? And is $150 a day to much to hope for? Thanks.

[QUOTE=XpatBubba;50871]I am new to the commercial (tug) side of the industry. I am a charter fishing guy but I cant make it during slow season with the new baby, it was hard last year, will not be possible this year. Time to get out before I piss on my nuts. I can continue my charter business on a smaller scale on my “off” days. I have no unrealistic expectations out of the industry, I will work 28/28 or 32/14, whatevernthehell. All I have is a 100GT near coastal master, STCW-95, TWIC & a passport. Do you think I can get a job as an OS? And is $150 a day to much to hope for? Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Xpat, check the maritime employment thread. There are posted several links to companies looking for deckhands,also some openings for 100T Masters.

Good luck

Thank you, I am still familiarizing myself with the site.

If you already have a 100 ton n/c why focus on tugs? You will have to start at the bottom and work your way up through apprentice mate then steersman. There are times I wish I had gone inshore, but remember you have the credentials to run quite a few vessels in the GoM for example. Right now i run a 170’ DP1 boat and its classed at 90 GRT. However most offshore boat work is 28/14…

Brotha,
The answer to that is, I am in Honduras and need to get outta Dodge. The best thing I can do is get out of Central America and get a good, or not terrible job. Gottsta hit the road. Thats why the hurry -up-offense. The 100GT thing could be a Godsend for me if I could catch wheelhouse, if not I will chip paint. I have 4 years of college under my belt, not that that matters. I am 6’1 and can lift a ton, not scared of working my way up, I a confident it will happen. I just need to get a job and get on the road. Selling fish in the slow season is not doing it. Old saying in spanish, a loosely translated: “A fisherman living the dream is a starving gringo”. I am ready to work.