Captain's standing orders


#1

Collegea captains,

I published my “own” captain’s standing orders on the web: [B]http://www.theartofdredging.com/captainsstandingorders.htm[/B]

I guess every captain has his version, some very abstract, others more elaborate, trying to cover every possible event.

I am curious to see others captain’s standing orders, so publish them along, will you ?

Reg.

Caps


#2

Caps - I thought this was a good topic, and was surprised that there were no replies. You have developed a very comprehensive list.

I was working as second captain on crew boats this winter in the GOM, and was always told to give the first captain a call if I was ever in doubt. That was about it.

If I am on a delivery, I’ve always told my crew the same, and added that I always wanted to be up if we were within 5 miles of any buoys. We were usually in open water, but the buoys were always around harbor entrances or rivers.

I enjoyed your web site. Nice job!


#3

Capts,

Very nice standing orders…Now I know when to call the captain…

How about a look at the action?? The Voyage Plan…


#4

Caps, Thanks for posting your standing orders. I have saved them for further reference. Mine are here. I don’t consider my orders to be the final word, I review and modify them almost every trip. Standing orders alone of course do not give a full picture. They are supplemented by the night orders, vessel procedures and the voyage plan. I have written three post on the subject here

Regards,
K.C.


#5

here is generic version…can be modified vessel specific.[ATTACH]38[/ATTACH]


#6

seadawg it appears the attachment is gone. Any chance you can re-post?


#7

dougpine,

as per your request

[ATTACH]99[/ATTACH]


#8

Thanks, dawg.


#9

Interesting indeed.

I have found that the length of a Captain’s standing orders was inversely proportional to his level of competence. Anything over one page and I’d know I was in trouble before meeting the guy.


#10

[quote=cmjeff;15354]Interesting indeed.

I have found that the length of a Captain’s standing orders was inversely proportional to his level of competence. Anything over one page and I’d know I was in trouble before meeting the guy.[/quote]

I hear that. I was handed a three ring binder once, with divider tabs, and told to read and sign it. There were chapters!!! The guy was a complete ass, but he sure put some effort into his standing orders.


#11

LOL… I’ve seen that once as well. Can’t find too many good things to say about the guy who wrote it. What was particularly frustrating is that half the orders in the binder contradicted the other half written. I should have listened to the 2nd mate when he said “Let me save you the time of reading that monstrosity and sum it up in one sentence. You’re F’d if you do and F’d if you don’t!”


#12

You’re F’d if you do and F’d if you don’t!"

Yes, true, when we got version 1.0 of the ISM procedures manual it was a monster. I had a third mate ask me about it. I told him if he failed to follow half of it he would be fired but if he followed the other half he would get fired as well. Of course he asked me which half was which - I told him nobody knows, we were all waiting so see what his fate would be.


#13

[QUOTE=Kennebec Captain;15438]. I told him if he failed to follow half of it he would be fired but if he followed the other half he would get fired as well.[/QUOTE]

Sounds like my first tanker gig. We were rounding FL with light traffic and I was typing out reports on laptop. I’d write a line or two and every 6-12 minutes get up and do a round. I didn’t realize the captain was “spying” on me until he walked onto the bridge and said, “John, 5 years ago if you opened that laptop on the bridge I would have fired you on the spot, now, with all the ISM BS, if I walk up on the bridge and you don’t have the laptop out I will fire you on the spot. Good job, just remember not to hit anything.”