Bulker collision in the Straits of Singapore

Damn he was late on the danger signal and taking avoiding action.

[QUOTE=Tugboater203;101532]http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=cd7_1362329626

Damn he was late on the danger signal and taking avoiding action.[/QUOTE]

What the FUCK was that?

I’ve only been through those straits a few times, but I do recall some people who seem to like to pass pretty damn close. I had an LNG tanker call up requesting to overtake me (on a RO/RO) at 1 cable.

In cases like this one, or just in every day life, it’s better to be proactive instead of reactive. Some of these ships seem like they aren’t allowed to deviate from the track line without contacting the captain, and it seems like the junior officers are afraid to call the old man. Going through Unimak Pass one night, we had a non US bulker who sent everyone scattering, because he couldn’t change course until he got to his waypoint, which happened to be on the right/north side of the pass.

This is just a typical day in the Malacca/Singapore Straits. In my many transits of these straits over thirty years, such near-misses and collisions somewhere within radar/VHF range were the norm, not the exception.

People in cars drive the same way around here as well
The worst accident post WWII which caused death was 100% caused by a navy vessel
When playing a WAFI out there I keep well clear of the professionals I mean the amateurs…damn I not sure which I mean

An excellent pit maneuver! Did anybody notice the switch of languages at the end?

“Sometimes on the highway, I wish you could just get up under, get em loose, and put em into the wall!”

Fully certified IMO STCW Bonobos.

[QUOTE=c.captain;101539]What the FUCK was that?[/QUOTE]

Did the rudder get stuck full over? And what about the language switch? Love it when the horn started blasting as the collision was all ready in full parade.

I think that there was nothing wrong with either of the vessels rudder. Simply unknown consequences of interaction forces between too close and too fast overtaking vessels. But since they experimented interaction, now they know ! Clearly a both to blame collision case …

I am so happy to sail into a compulsory pilotage district !

[QUOTE=Topsail;101622]I think that there was nothing wrong with either of the vessels rudder. Simply unknown consequences of interaction forces between too close and too fast overtaking vessels. But since they experimented interaction, now they know ! Clearly a both to blame collision case …

I am so happy to sail into a compulsory pilotage district !

[/QUOTE]

It can get confusing:

http://www.titanicebook.com/wheel.html

The video did seem to show both vessels were locked in forceful, deadly, and uncontrollable grip.
By looking at the prop wash it doesn’t seem any astern engine orders were given., but it’s hard to tell.

By looking at the prop wash it doesn’t seem any astern engine orders were given., but it’s hard to tell.

A far as I know, you need to have an engine down to maneuvering speed to go astern … which I believe not to be the case for most of the time that, known and agreed in the same manner as Rule 5 - Look-Out by IMO SOLAS.

The video did seem to show both vessels were locked in forceful, deadly, and uncontrollable grip.

Exactly, both vessels were locked in forceful, deadly and uncontrollable grip (Bernoulli & Venturi pressure & vacuum effect) because they were too close from each other, were proceeding too fast (f = mV²/2) and reacted too late !

Overtaking in narrow channel, fairways or restricted waters is the most dangerous maneuver. It needs a lot of attention to the wheel and speed control. The overtaken vessel must give his accord and take steps to permit safe passing by choosing the side to be overtaken, giving room as safe and practicable and by reducing RPM to minimum for steerage. The vessel overtaking shall take the same steps to permit safe passing by agreeing the side to overtake, giving room and reducing speed to maneuvering at the least. Relative speed between the vessels should not exceed 4 knots. As well, you should be capable to anticipate and counteract the effect of interaction instead of reacting regrettably too late.

RULE 13 Overtaking — International

(a) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rules of Part B, Sections I and II, any vessel overtaking any other vessel shall keep out of the way of the vessel being overtaken.

(d) Any subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall not make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these Rules or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

Narrow Channels — International

(a) A vessel proceeding along the course of a narrow channel or fairway shall keep as near to the outer limit of the channel or fairway which lies on her starboard side as is safe and practicable.

(e) (i) In a narrow channel or fairway when overtaking can take place only if the vessel to be overtaken has to take action to permit safe passing, the vessel intending to overtake shall indicate her intention by sounding the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34©(i). The vessel to be overtaken shall, if in agreement, sound the appropriate signal prescribed in Rule 34©(ii) and take steps to permit safe passing. If in doubt she may sound the signals prescribed in Rule 34(d).

(ii) This Rule does not relieve the overtaking vessel of her obligation under Rule 13.

[QUOTE=Sweat-n-Grease;101627]It can get confusing:

http://www.titanicebook.com/wheel.html[/QUOTE]

Patten is the granddaughter of Titanic Second Officer Charles Lightoller, who was the top-ranking survivor of the Titanic sinking other than the company chairman. The public looked to Lightoller to tell the world what happened. Lady Patten says the only person Lightoller told the truth about why the Titanic sunk was to his wife Sylvia. He, other officers and owners of White Star Line lied at both the American and British inquests held after the sinking to protect themselves from criminal charges, ruining their careers and bankrupting the company. In the end, all they avoided was criminal charges.

Patten says her grandfather alleged that the iceberg was spotted by look out Frederick Fleet, the order was then given by First Officer Murdock to turn “hard-a-starboard” (left) and instead one of six quartermasters aboard, Robert Hitchins, who was at the wheel, turned port (right), apparently not understanding what those two newly used terms meant, steering the ill-fated passenger ship into the iceberg instead of away from it as ordered. Murdock then immediately gave the equivalent order of “not that left you dummy the other left”, but it was too late to miss the iceberg.

http://www.cruisebruise.com/Archives/Ship_Sinkings/Titanic_Sinking.html

[QUOTE=Topsail;101664]Patten is the granddaughter of Titanic Second Officer Charles Lightoller, who was the top-ranking survivor of the Titanic sinking other than the company chairman. The public looked to Lightoller to tell the world what happened. Lady Patten says the only person Lightoller told the truth about why the Titanic sunk was to his wife Sylvia. He, other officers and owners of White Star Line lied at both the American and British inquests held after the sinking to protect themselves from criminal charges, ruining their careers and bankrupting the company. In the end, all they avoided was criminal charges.

Patten says her grandfather alleged that the iceberg was spotted by look out Frederick Fleet, the order was then given by First Officer Murdock to turn “hard-a-starboard” (left) and instead one of six quartermasters aboard, Robert Hitchins, who was at the wheel, turned port (right), apparently not understanding what those two newly used terms meant, steering the ill-fated passenger ship into the iceberg instead of away from it as ordered. Murdock then immediately gave the equivalent order of “not that left you dummy the other left”, but it was too late to miss the iceberg.

http://www.cruisebruise.com/Archives/Ship_Sinkings/Titanic_Sinking.html[/QUOTE]

I thank you. me, being an amateur Maritime Historian of no repute (I do read, don’t’cha know), I find.this information fascinating.
Most of us have read had the Titanic hit the iceberg head on there would be severe damage yet the ship would not sink.
It seems to be the case of Big Wigs without a sense of basic seamanship, and little or no honor, were the culprits.
Funny, just like today.

“Mistakes were made” ~

[QUOTE=Sweat-n-Grease;101680]“Mistakes were made” ~[/QUOTE]

Titanic was equipped by:

  • 5 ballast pumps of 250 LT/Hour, for a pumping capacity of 0.35 LT/Second,
  • 3 ballast pumps of 150 LT/Hour, for a pumping capacity of 0.13 LT/Second,

… so for a total pumping capacity of 0.50 LT/ Second.

The intermittent hull breach on the riveted hull strakes seams was around 200 foot long by ¾ of an inch wide and over 5 so called watertight compartments, for a total breach surface of only 12 square foot. But such a breach at 25 foot deep would let ingress 13 LT/Second of frigid ocean water !!!

The titan was really doomed … :frowning:

There was a better one in Singapore 20 years ago
3 ships departed eastern anchorage one after the other last one fastest first slowest, each just got an overlap at raffles light and the first one goes to stb to round then realises its stern swing will hit ship 2 which it does so it straightens up.
Meanwhile ship 2 avoids to port and its stern hits ship3 now they all straighten up but ship 1 now very slow due to the turn so ship 3 hits it from behind as no-where to go.
An assessor showed me the radar dumps ( Singapore records them)
Real Laurel and Hardy stuff