Abs

I’ve searched the forums and I’ve used my friend " Google" now I’m reaching out to the experienced boatman. What’s the deal with a ABS certified boat? Say you buy a boat that’s ABS certified but don’t re-certify once it’s due. What are the benefits of having a ABS cert on a near coastal 199 Ton towing vessel?

Most oil companies require ABS certification to be allowed to haul their oil. Generally insurance is higher on coastwise Tows if being towed By a non ABS tug. And some cargos won’t even get insured unless it is an ABS barge.

I think (but not certain) that there is a 100 ton cutoff to tow outside the boundry line without ABS. Maybe someone else can chime in on that.

Also its WAY easier to recertify than to start from scratch. Which would be the case if it has lapsed.

We have >100 ton tugs that are ABS. Doesn’t matter to my knowledge.

I think he meant that one cannot tow outside the boundry line without being ABS certified.

[QUOTE=Capt. Phoenix;79651]I think he meant that one cannot tow outside the boundry line without being ABS certified.[/QUOTE]

REPLY I am rusty on this and may be out of date, but as I recall . . . Classification is a separate and distinct issue from loadlines.

There are a great many tugs, probably most of them, towing outside without ABS classification. Some of them are over 200 tons. Vessels over a certain size and on certain waters must be classed. I don’t remember what that threshold is, but its larger than most tugs, probably at the SOLAS level. If a vessel is required to be “in class”; it could be “classed” by any of the IACS classification societies (I think there are eight of them, for example Lloyds and DNV); it would not have to be classed by ABS. At one time US vessels were exclusively classed by the ABS, but not anymore.

Vessels over a certain size going outside (or on the Great Lakes) are suppose to have loadlines (as I recall its greater than 79 feet or 149 GRT), but loadlines are an altogether different issue than classification. Loadlines are also assigned by classification societies. Many tugs have loadlines. Usually ABS loadlines, but loadlines can be issued by one of the other class societies.

When a mariner says that their tug is ABS, they usually mean that it has a loadline issued by the ABS. When the sales department at the office says that the tug they are offering is ABS, they usually mean that it is classed by the ABS. These are two completely different things.

Exactly, tugsailor. ABS, IACS or any other Class is often a requirement of any Hull and Machinery insurance policy; and quite often cargo and P&I. The Load Line regulations are separate from Class. Most flag states will defer the loadline assignment to a Class society, but some (Mexico comes right to mind) do not. The loadline requirements are a function of the age of the vessel, length and trade route (international, etc.). I am not in my office right now, so I can’t give the actual numbers and am too lazy to do an internet search.

As far as getting a vessel classed, if it was not built to any Class (ABS, DNV, LR, NK, BV, etc.) or not to an IACS Society (PR, IR, etc.), it would probably be easier to build one to Class.

Many companies that run tugs will have them built to Class, but then once the renewal comes up, they will drop Class and keep the loadline. The loadline renewal and annual surveys are similar in scope to the Special and Annual Class hull surveys. When a vessel is “Loadline Only”, machinery is not considered, outside of hull fastenings, watertight integrity, compartmentalization, damage stability, etc.

For instance, right now, I am onboard a vessel that was built to Class, many years ago. It has been converted a couple of times and now only maintains a Loadline Certificate.

Thanks for the clarification. My confusion was clearly between the differences in a ABS Class type vessel and a ABS loadline only vessel. Thanks again for the help and once again the gcaptain forum has bailed me out.

[QUOTE=cmakin;79664] … if it was not built to any Class (ABS, DNV, LR, NK, BV, etc.) or not to an IACS Society (PR, IR, etc.), [/QUOTE]

Uh, IACS is the abbreviation for [B]I[/B]nternational [B]A[/B]ssociation of [B]C[/B]lassification [B]S[/B]ocieties and your list plus another 8 etceteras are member societies.

…or not to an IACS Society (PR, IR, etc.)

You’ll need to explain that one a bit more, it doesn’t make any sense at all.

[QUOTE=Steamer;79754]Uh, IACS is the abbreviation for [B]I[/B]nternational [B]A[/B]ssociation of [B]C[/B]lassification [B]S[/B]ocieties and your list plus another 8 etceteras are member societies.

You’ll need to explain that one a bit more, it doesn’t make any sense at all.[/QUOTE]

PR is Polish Registry, but I just see where they were reinstated (surprising) last year. IR is the International Register (based in Miami) that still isn’t. There are many others, too.

[QUOTE=tugboatchief;79612]I’ve searched the forums and I’ve used my friend " Google" now I’m reaching out to the experienced boatman. What’s the deal with a ABS certified boat? Say you buy a boat that’s ABS certified but don’t re-certify once it’s due. What are the benefits of having a ABS cert on a near coastal 199 Ton towing vessel?[/QUOTE]

Did you find your next tug yet? Was going to write to you to say that there are a couple very interesting boat for sale in the latest issue of Boats and Harbors. There’s a 93’ boat with 399 CATS for $900k on page 58 and even more intriguing a 148’er w/ 16-546 E7’s for $995k on page 59.

this is that 2nd boat…does anyone who who’s it is and its name?

a very big tug for the $$$

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We have our eye on a few boats in the Gulf. One was the Smith Ranger but her priced jumped from 1.2 to 2.4 and that’s not in our budget. The 93 footer you are talking about… What’s the beam? We are in the market for a 90-95 footer with a 28-30ft beam twin screw model bow open wheel.