15 American DPO's Wanted


#1

Send CV and availibility and day rate to the email below. Further details will be given when CV are recieved.

Boyd Kennen

bkennen@subseaconsulting.com
cell(318)308-4725


#2

If anyone take less than $650/day, you’re screwing up the economy.


#3

Amen to that! <br><br>The market for qualified personnel is tightening…a lot…if you’re looking for a career change up, or if you’re just starting out, I would say now might be a good time to consider training for a career in DP, or LNG.


#4

$650 plus benefits!

anchor handler mate


#5

I just started not too long ago in DP and I must say its a beautiful thing!


#6

“The market for qualified personnel is tightening…a lot…if you’re
looking for a career change up, or if you’re just starting out, I would
say now might be a good time to consider training for a career in DP,
or LNG.”
<br><br>What is the extent of training for these careers? Would the first step be getting your license?


#7

Sorry?I am a tyro.<br>Would someone tell me the exact meaning of DPO? dynamic position offshore?<br><br>Thanks a million!


#8

How does DPO licensing parallel the normal licensing scheme? Would anyone recommend starting out in DP, or building up your license first and then switching over to DP?


#9

<P>Nissin… DPO is Dynamic Positioning Officer or Operator.<br><br>Steve… There is no DP licensing scheme. The industry standard at this time is a certification from the Nautical Institute. To obtain that you need to attend induction training, gain on the job experience, attend a simulator course, and then gain more experience and get your qualifications signed off.<br><br>As for starting out in DP it’s unlikely that you’d be hired in without either a minimum of a 3rd Mate’s license or some sort of electronics background and degree. There’s a great debate ongoing through various threads on this site and amongst those in the industry as to who makes a better DPO. There is no right answer. There are people from both backgrounds who understand the complexity and responsibility of the job and those who want to make a good living with little effort and then play the blame game when they cause millions of dollars in lost revenue or damage.<br><br>As a drillship captain I prefer to have licensed DPO’s who can fill the role of officer of the watch since they are essentially doing that job anyway. When the ship is underway they can take right over instead of having to drag the mates off of the deck when they have a million other things to do. They can also progress to be Master’s themselves and use their DP experience to their benefit in that role. There are great operators that had ET backgrounds too but they are at a dead end on a ship. Future career paths include inspection and certification of DP systems as a consultant or corporate roles assisting in policy making and vessel support. Of course those would be available to licensed guys too.</P>
<P>If DP is a route you want to take I recommend starting off with a reputable company. This guy’s website isn’t even up yet so something tells me he’s not very well established.</P>


#10

<P>How do I go about getting a job oof shore? I was in the carpenters union for years and went back to mortgage banking. Now the industry is not so good and I need to start a new career, any suggestions on getting in the industry? Also my fiance would be interested as well if their is a spot for her…thanks</P>


#11

$650 a day…I couldn’t take that kind of pay cut!!


#12

I’d take someone out for $650/day. LOL


#13

$650 a day ??? holy shit thats good money!<br><br>Where do I sign up? No shit, whats the best way to get into this field??


#14

Slow down people, if Capt Lee is truly working for Chouest he isn’t making $650/day unless he’s selling a little of Chouest’s fuel on the sly or they got a raise in the last few weeks. <br>


#15

Engineer …you are a dork…it was a joke MAN!


#16

Capt. Lee, I was sympathizing with you, just wanted to make sure none of the new guys took things too seriously. For goodness sakes don’t take me too seriously !<br>I heard from one of my Chouest friends recently that the new AHTS Dino was going to be unlimited. Is that true? If so you certainly deserve a slot there. I have a couple of friends at Chouest and they all speak highly of you and your drive to increase your knowledge beyond the necessary requirements. <br>Good luck !


#17

I am new to contributing to this forum but hardly new to working at sea or offshore in the GoM.<br><br>I could write a book imparting my knowledge and experience to persons wanting to enter the DP offshore world but think I will pass doing that right now. What I will say is that wages went way up in mid 2006 but have stalled until now. There appears to be a major move upward again as more new equipment is delivered to the industry beginning this summer going through now to 2012. This is a fabulous moment to get in if you want to. The promotion and money potential are real and right now if you have something to bring first with you like a unlimited tonnage license.<br><br>All I want to say to the esteemed CaptLee is to please act like an officer and use some civility even if responding to a critic. Your reply: “Engineer …you are a dork…it was a joke MAN!” is petty and small. Enough said.<br><br>Finally, if you are really happy at Chouest then “good on you mate”. Some people people are happy and some not. I have not worked for them myself but know plenty who have. That they “have” says what their opinions are. Btw, both the DINO and LANEY CHOUSET are 5900grt and thus qualify as"large OSVs". I will not comment on that one because it would be hard for me to remain civil.<br><br>cheers


#18

OMG-knotship, Please explain to me how an “Officer” is supposed to act. Is there a text book answer for that. A clone for us all to adhere to. On this forum I am not at work. I can relax and say what I think. I was fooling around with tengineer and he set me straight. I can handle it. I guess I deserve taking a punch from you. Lord knows I throw some punches, too. Please write me a list of acceptable behavior so I can live up to your standards of conduct. Should I take an oath to participate in conversation with you? Stand at Attention, Stoic, Expressionless? Please! I appreciate the esteemed comment. Although I would not use the word esteemed and my name in the same sentence. I am a man trying to make a living on the water.<br><br>BTW-you are off with your info. The Laney Chouest is 5922 tons. The Dino Chouest will be the same dimensions, but it will be over 6000 tons. There was a tonnage exempt space on the Laney used while calculating tonnage and the Dino exceeds the exemption and will be over 6000 tons. What is going to happen is still up in the air, but I “think” the plan is a new classification as Subchapter L + (plus). Which I think means they will increase the tonnage on the Master OSV. I think there is going to be additional training involved in getting the license to include some Managment Level STCW classes. Please comment on what you think about that. It would be a mistake to take an Unlimited Master with very little experience on anchor handling vessels OSV’s and put him in charge of a boat like that. The training and job requirements are unique. It is better suited to train an individual that has 20-30 years experience doing that type of work, to operate a larger vessel. It takes years to become proficient handling a boat in such close proximity to structures and maintaining proper bollard pull taking into account side forces, job scope, weights, safety to crew and personnel working right next to a wire under tension. It’s not rocket science, it just takes specialized training that most unlimited guys do not have. Not only do you have to have confidence in what you are doing, the crew on the deck doing the rigging must have confidence in you. My point is those types of vessels are unique in their size and scope of work.


#19

Capt. Lee, <br>“What is going to happen is still up in the air, but I “think” the plan
is a new classification as Subchapter L + (plus). Which I think means
they will increase the tonnage on the Master OSV”<br> Why invent a new license?<br><br><br> <br>“It would be a mistake to
take an Unlimited Master with very little experience on anchor handling
vessels OSV’s and put him in charge of a boat like that. The training
and job requirements are unique. It is better suited to train an
individual that has 20-30 years experience doing that type of work, to
operate a larger vessel. It takes years to become proficient handling
a boat in such close proximity to structures and maintaining proper
bollard pull taking into account side forces, job scope, weights,
safety to crew and personnel working right next to a wire under
tension.”<br><br><br> Anchor handling is not rocket science. There are people currently working for Chouest and other companies who are handling anchors on a watch alone after 6 months on an anchor boat. This is with Delmar or other anchor supplying companies manning the winches and doing the rigging. It’s not like the Gulf of Mexico mates are responsible for the entire operation as they are in the North Sea. No one can honestly believe it would take someone with 20-30 years experience to do that type work unless they were very slow learners. If one only allowed those with 20-30 years experience to captain anchor boats they would have to park 99% of the anchor boats.<br> <br><br>Could someone please respond to a thread I made on a previous post regarding the minimum sea time and tests required under USCG regulations to be a 6000t OSV master? I cannot find that information on the USCG website.<br> <br>Thanks <br>


#20

<P align=justify>Tengineer- You misunderstand my comments or I did not properly explain myself. knotships’ insinuation was that he disagreed that a boat of that size should not have unlimited people on it. I do not think it takes 20-30 years experience and training to work on an anchor handler. It definitely takes more than 6 months. There are so many facets and different types of jobs that it does take several years to see and experience the different types of jobs. Then there is new technology and new anchor components. New to everybody. I wrote it myself that it is not rocket science. Our crew does not do the rigging, but the person driving the boat is definitely responsible for the people on the back deck. You need to know exactly what is going on at all times, step by step. Where you’ve been, where you’re at at what the next step is. You need to be able to anticipate and react. You need to know what your engineer is doing, what the winch operator is doing, what oceaneering is doing, what you are doing and what the supervisor on the back deck is doing, how much tonnage is on the winch, what kind of power you have all simultaneously. Not to mention where the cable is under your vessel. Where the submersible buoy is going to pop up when retrieving. Of course there are engineers that just graduated college on the rig sometimes using a program that they just started playing with tell you where you need to be for a disconnect. How do you know the numbers are right. You have to be able to know when things are not right, CONFIDENTLY. That definitely takes more than 6 months. You need to be able to recognize hazards immediately and break the chain if you see an incident unfolding. Can someone be in the bridge and do what he is told by a winch operator who may not have a clue himself…Sure, but to proficiently do the job definitely takes more than 6 months. My statement about 20-30 years is “not” a training requirement. I do not have that myself. I can tell you that I am pretty good at anchor handling and boat handling in general, but every step of the way I have had an experienced 10 to 30 year anchor handler looking over my shoulder helping me. Correcting me and making me better. My comparison is this, Now listen because it seems “YOU” are a slow interpreter…Take an Unlimited Guy with no experience at all anchor handling. Simply because he has the unlimited license? Or take someone who has 20-30 years experience doing that type of work his entire career and require a little training to handle a little larger vessel. That is the comparison. It really does not apply to me since I am unlimited and I have the experience. I am talking about the OSV industry in general.<br><br>There is no testing requirement for Master OSV 6000ITC. The Large OSV program is an OJT type training with approved assesors. The same with Chief OSV. If you have a Chief Limited Oceans/Near Coastal your skills can be assessed by an engineer. Signed off and requested Chief OSV with so many days training turned in with your training book. For Master OSV the training is 84-12 hour days. I am not completely familiar with the OMSA Mate, Chief Mate, Master OSV testing requirements, but I know they have to take pretty much the same tests. Rules, Deck General, Nav General, Safety, Terrestrial, Plotting, Celestial if applicable. The main thing the OSV system is bypassing is the STCW required training for operational level classes. They still have to do the basics, but it cuts out stuff like magnetic and gyro compass, basic ship handling, all the 3M/2M classes.</P>