Waterspout, Have you ever experienced this at Sea?

Tell us when and where?

Saw a couple monster waterspouts 100 miles off Hatteras one day about 10 years ago… Hot muggy weather no wind and all of a sudden a giant one crossed about 2 miles ahead of the boat… There was another one farther off… They were slow moving and easy to avoid… The scary thing is the amount of water in them… All the way up to the clouds! Also saw them in between St. Croix and St. John once… They were much smaller but there were like 20 of them at once in a small area…probably more dangerous than the big ones for a small boat.
Seems like as I recall they occur in hot muggy still weather, thunderstorm weather. Common in the Caribbean during the Hurricane season.

[QUOTE=fishyluke;187714]Saw a couple monster waterspouts 100 miles off Hatteras one day about 10 years ago… Hot muggy weather no wind and all of a sudden a giant one crossed about 2 miles ahead of the boat… There was another one farther off… They were slow moving and easy to avoid… The scary thing is the amount of water in them… All the way up to the clouds! Also saw them in between St. Croix and St. John once… They were much smaller but there were like 20 of them at once in a small area…probably more dangerous than the big ones for a small boat.
Seems like as I recall they occur in hot muggy still weather, thunderstorm weather. Common in the Caribbean during the Hurricane season.[/QUOTE]

Great story - Thanks for the share fishyluke. The lower Florida Keys reports more waterspout activity than any other location in the world.

//youtu.be/R3g68Bcyo3U

[QUOTE=DeepSeaDiver;187644]Tell us when and where?

[/QUOTE]

This photo is a very famous photoshop that was put out during Hurricane Ivan. . . and comes up from time to time.

Here is one I shot in 2012 while offshore on a lay barge for a few days.

Waterspout2 by

Kool - That one I posted was just on the internet so I posted it for some graphics to the thread starter. Did not know about the photoshop stuff? No matter what it’s still kool.

[QUOTE=DeepSeaDiver;187817]Kool - That one I posted was just on the internet so I posted it for some graphics to the thread starter. Did not know about the photoshop stuff? No matter what it’s still kool.[/QUOTE]

Ok thanks cmakin I believed you and was not disputing it. - Has anybody else ever seen a waterspout at sea? Besides cmakin and fishyluke?

Water spouts are a common sight in the Gulf of Mexico. I live on the coast and have seen hundreds in my lifetime. Thermal thunderstorms during the warmer months generate many funnel clouds along the coast. Some fully develop. I’ve seen 7 funnels in one cloud before. Probably the most active area is the mouth of the Mississippi River. We watched the Federal Pilot boat intentionally pass through the base of a small spout about 10 years ago with no damage. Better him than me…

I watched one come into the mouth of Pascagoula harbor about 15 years ago while I was tied up at Chevron onboard a tanker. It’s not a good feeling having one anywhere near you when you are pumping product and are basically a sitting duck. It died out before it got within striking distance thank god. I’ve seen a few out at sea over the years. They are pretty cool when you can turn and run the other direction.

[QUOTE=DeepSeaDiver;187842]Ok thanks cmakin I believed you and was not disputing it. - Has anybody else ever seen a waterspout at sea? Besides cmakin and fishyluke?[/QUOTE]

I have seen many more. That is the only one that I have been able to photograph, or at least have a copy of it. I remember crossing the Gulf on our way back from San Juan in the 80s and about a day out of Cameron, a line of thunderstorms came down on us. . . there were as many as three or four waterspouts at varying points, but not close together as in that photo. I also recall seeing an outbound LNG tanker moving through the storms, too. They are a fairly common thing to see on the Gulf Coast, but rarely cause much damage. I recall one in Galveston when I was working there that took down an old brick wall off of Port Industrial as it came ashore off of the channel.

I guess being down below cut down my chances of seeing one but the one that I did see left a lasting impression on me.

We were loaded heading to PE from Texas City in what was really great weather. The Captain called me and said to get up to the Upper Wheelhouse. Once I got up there I saw what only those that sail can understand. It looked as if we were heading into a Black Wall, it was really cool looking but at the same time you knew the ass kicking that was coming.

All of a sudden up pops a Water Spout. It ended up crossing right over the Barge that we were Pushing. Anything and everything that was not bolted / welded down moved. The deck lines that were secured for sea ending up a knotted mess. The area that the Spout passed over was spotless! It almost looked like it was water blasted, which I guess it was.

Seeing this Spout, if anything increased my respect for Mother Nature and the fact that She can at anytime turn a really great trip into one that you will be talking about for a longtime.

I saw two water spouts form up, travel a few miles, and then dissolve, working offshore Gulf of Mexico as a wireline engineer in 1978. Wish I had pictures - they were quite close to the rig I was working on. It was close to the time that a very strong thunderstorm had passed by, in this case the whole rig was buzzing with electrical static discharge. I stood on the grating ~100’ above the water near my logging unit at one point and held a screwdriver in my hand with the bit parallel to my pointer finger and a spark would jump between my finger and the screwdriver! Have also seen water spouts off St. Lucia on the leeward side.

[QUOTE=Allgonquin;188041]I saw two water spouts form up, travel a few miles, and then dissolve, working offshore Gulf of Mexico as a wireline engineer in 1978. Wish I had pictures - they were quite close to the rig I was working on. It was close to the time that a very strong thunderstorm had passed by, in this case the whole rig was buzzing with electrical static discharge. I stood on the grating ~100’ above the water near my logging unit at one point and held a screwdriver in my hand with the bit parallel to my pointer finger and a spark would jump between my finger and the screwdriver! Have also seen water spouts off St. Lucia on the leeward side.[/QUOTE]

Old prof of mine used to tell a similar story. Except he was more than a mile above sea-level (in the Rockies) and instead of a screwdriver-finger gap, it was the gap between a horse’s ears.

Now I am older and more educated. I am strongly skeptical of a single, individual horse being able to develope a sparkable potential between it’s own two ears. Although its a great friggin story. But I wonder if he saw the spark jump between the ears of two adjacent horses… O.O could it be? Screwdriver bit and finger makes sense, because the tool-handle may provide insulation. And it shows the flaw in how I imagined my old teacher’s story.

I been trying for years, and electricity is sorta, kinda starting to make sense. I’m a good troubleshooter, but I mean on a deep level: it’s starting to click.

I have seen many over the year, both at sea and from shore, but no pictures, or any anecdotes.
These picture of one appearing in Singapore Strait, off the East coast of Singapore is real, not photo shopped, I believe: http://www.todayonline.com/photos/gallery-waterspout-spotted-near-east-coast-park-area-saturday-afternoon