Walker Ridge Incident

Anyone have an update on what happened specifically? We’re hearing it was related to a 4.5 knot current.

Did someone lose position and part a riser?

did you find out anything during the day today Rob?

Does this have to do with DPO’s running the engine room?

Disclaimer: hope nobody is hurt and it’s not an incident that will negatively impact any prosperity in the industry.

[QUOTE=c.captain;157807]did you find out anything during the day today Rob?[/QUOTE]

Not really, except verification that something actually did happen, but what exactly happened is unclear - was it just a forced LMRP unlatching or a parted riser, I don’t know.

[QUOTE=rob;157831]Not really, except verification that something actually did happen, but what exactly happened is unclear - was it just a forced LMRP unlatching or a parted riser, I don’t know.[/QUOTE]

4.5kts is certainly wicked strong but it doesn’t come out of nowhere without warning so an emergency disconnect or worse is inexcusable. FUCKING drilling dpos goofing off on the internet or watching TV when at the desk. Yes, they do that at a certain company which name starts with an E…seen it with my own eyes! Wasn’t on their drillships but on their semis but same idiocy! I wonder if them have in real masters on those rigs has made any difference in their dpos work ethic?

[QUOTE=c.captain;157838]4.5kts is certainly wicked strong but it doesn’t come out of nowhere without warning so an emergency disconnect or worse is inexcusable. FUCKING drilling dpos goofing off on the internet or watching TV when at the desk. Yes, they do that at a certain company which name starts with an E…seen it with my own eyes! Wasn’t on their drillships but on their semis but same idiocy! I wonder if them have in real masters on those rigs has made any difference in their dpos work ethic?[/QUOTE]
Didnt the DW Horizon have a master that was too scared to disconnect, wrong or no training or wrong skill set or something?

[QUOTE=powerabout;157917]Didnt the DW Horizon have a master that was too scared to disconnect, wrong or no training or wrong skill set or something?[/QUOTE]

please do not get me started about that BOOB

OK will do
its just that in an emergency the drilling industry seems to have a habit of making an emergency into major catastrophic event.

[QUOTE=powerabout;157920]OK will do
its just that in an emergency the drilling industry seems to have a habit of making an emergency into major catastrophic event.[/QUOTE]

The contributing factor to me was more about company policy that caused the confusion. There were many errors that led to the disaster. Very hard to pin this on just one person. In any emergency mistakes will be made. The best you can do is drills, training and competency. Of course prevention is the best, but there is no way of knowing how people will react when something real happens. In most emergencies that I have been involved in things went much better than I could have anticipated.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;157931]The contributing factor to me was more about company policy that caused the confusion. There were many errors that led to the disaster. Very hard to pin this on just one person. In any emergency mistakes will be made. The best you can do is drills, training and competency. Of course prevention is the best, but there is no way of knowing how people will react when something real happens. In most emergencies that I have been involved in things went much better than I could have anticipated.[/QUOTE]

Kuchta panicked…plain and simple and it was the other officers and crew on the rig which prevented the death toll from being much higher as well as the crew of the DAMON BANKSTON for reacting as real professionals and saving as many as they did. It is an abysmal failure when people end up jumping. The same thing happened with the GALAXY in the Bering Sea. Horrible drilling and nonexistent major emergency planning. Noble hated it when I took things so seriously and even did not allow me to make my own station bill…I had to use a standard company model which was woefully lacking in organization of teams and their specific duties.

What amazed me is after DWH, the sweeping changes to offshore industry emergency planning I expected never happened and that is because the drillers refused to even consider making those changes because it upset their culture. DWH will happen again someday, there will be another rig explosion or other cataclysmic event and the next time the owner may not be so lucky as to get away with only 11 fatalities.

What???
The greatest U/L Master of all time folded and didn’t do what he knew was right? Grow a pair PLEASE!!! Stop folding to JOE BOSS.

My guess is you had more folks on the station bill to fight a fire than the US NAVEEE uses. LOL!!!

[QUOTE=AB Murph;157981]My guess is you had more folks on the station bill to fight a fire than the US NAVEEE uses.[/QUOTE]

well when you have the total number of persons on a drillship, you have the luxury of having teams to backstop other teams…

I also wanted the lifeboats to be fully manned and ready for launch WHILE an emergency response was being undertaken instead of the silliness of transitioning from emergency response mode to abandon mode with all the resultant time lost in the process. Time to get everybody safely off a burning rig might well be down to a few seconds if things are really bad as they were on DWH.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;157931]The contributing factor to me was more about company policy that caused the confusion. There were many errors that led to the disaster. Very hard to pin this on just one person. In any emergency mistakes will be made. The best you can do is drills, training and competency. Of course prevention is the best, but there is no way of knowing how people will react when something real happens. In most emergencies that I have been involved in things went much better than I could have anticipated.[/QUOTE]
Nothing has been learnt since Piper Alpha has it?

DWH will happen again, it’s only a matter of time. Complacency, lack of understanding, and terrible judgment calls will lead to this.

[QUOTE=powerabout;158004]Nothing has been learnt since Piper Alpha has it?[/QUOTE]

I completely disagree. I think a lot has been learned. Stop work authority in particular. The people on the other production platforms did not have the authority to stop production and this kept feeding the fire on Piper Alpha. If they had immediately shut down production the fire would have went out much sooner and lives would have been saved. Please stop these one liners if you don’t have a clue what you are talking about. I could write a book about what has been learned from this and other disasters. The issue is people and human error. As long as people are involved there will be errors.

Focus on permit to work is now industry standard. The problem in our industry and many others is normalization of deviance. The normalization of deviance is defined as: “The gradual process through which unacceptable practice or standards become acceptable. As the deviant behavior is repeated without catastrophic results, it becomes the social norm for the organization.” It is hard to recognize and even harder to correct. When taking shortcuts and there are no consequences it becomes the norm. You may take the same shortcut 100 or even a thousand times without consequence. Each time that happens it reinfoces the idea that it is OK, until disaster strikes. Just because you have done something a certain way for years doesn’t make it right. Think outside of the box.

[QUOTE=rob;157774]Anyone have an update on what happened specifically? We’re hearing it was related to a 4.5 knot current.

Did someone lose position and part a riser?[/QUOTE]

The Jim Day lost 3000’ of 20" casing last Thursday night in Walker Ridge.

[QUOTE=anchorman;158061]The Jim Day lost 3000’ of 20" casing last Thursday night in Walker Ridge.[/QUOTE]

a round of applause as Noble Drilling goes on to scale new heights of drilling achievement…a paragon in the industry!

Was there no “well specific operating criteria” in place? Or were the guidelines just ignored?
Most companies have blue,yellow, and red operational limits, and specifically outline certain steps that need to be taken when reaching certain levels.
The main ones, in this incident it seems, would have been thruster percentage and/or engine percentage guidelines. We all know those damn current meters never work properly, so go ahead and throw that guideline out the window.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;158043]I completely disagree. I think a lot has been learned. Stop work authority in particular. The people on the other production platforms did not have the authority to stop production and this kept feeding the fire on Piper Alpha. If they had immediately shut down production the fire would have went out much sooner and lives would have been saved. Please stop these one liners if you don’t have a clue what you are talking about. I could write a book about what has been learned from this and other disasters. The issue is people and human error. As long as people are involved there will be errors.

Focus on permit to work is now industry standard. The problem in our industry and many others is normalization of deviance. The normalization of deviance is defined as: “The gradual process through which unacceptable practice or standards become acceptable. As the deviant behavior is repeated without catastrophic results, it becomes the social norm for the organization.” It is hard to recognize and even harder to correct. When taking shortcuts and there are no consequences it becomes the norm. You may take the same shortcut 100 or even a thousand times without consequence. Each time that happens it reinfoces the idea that it is OK, until disaster strikes. Just because you have done something a certain way for years doesn’t make it right. Think outside of the box.[/QUOTE]
So we learnt the processes after Piper Alpha but we never use them…
With all those processes in place we still allowed the DWH to accumulate one mistake after the other and finally end up as we know it
I stand by my statement.

PS who has a permit to work process where one permit is linked to another for the big picture scenario?

[QUOTE=powerabout;158349]

PS who has a permit to work process where one permit is linked to another for the big picture scenario?[/QUOTE]

There are many, particularly the companies that have invested in electronic PTW systems with summary operational boundary inputs from vessel’s safety case.