Vso


#1

Must a VSO be onboard at all times?

What happens if there is an incident and the VSO/Master is absent?


#2

[QUOTE=seadog!;21694]Must a VSO be onboard at all times?

What happens if there is an incident and the VSO/Master is absent?[/QUOTE]

There is nothing that says a VSO “must” be onboard at all times, in safe harbor, but that might open some debate. Personally, that question can go for anyone - no duties are any more or less important than the rest when it comes to safety and security. What happens? You have to do the same with less. The next question is, “does the Chief Mate have to have a VSO endorsement to assume the role when the Master is absent, provided that the Master was VSO”? I would think yes - just by definition of what a Chief Mate is, the C/M should have that training and assume the role of VSO. This would depend on the SSP.


#3

My opinion is the same.
Ussually master is vso, and mate is his deputy.
If something happens - mate takes over, should make some report on acident / incident on ssp form, which will be countersigned by master.
There is also posibility depending on vsl ISM guides - maybe additionaly to report on some specific ISM form if required.

Probably, debrefing of the crew about the incident with logging in OLB the security meeting.

Thats about procedure.
What to do about the incident when vso is not on board will depend on cicrumstances of the event, actions taken by deputy vso and procedures required from ssp - for which mate should be familiarised with, and signed in ssp manual or log his familiarisation.


#4

[quote=jolly;21699]My opinion is the same.
Usually master is vso, and mate is his deputy.
[/quote]

That is the opposite of my personal experience. I was VSO as Chief Mate and the Captain was my stand in. One of us had to be aboard at all times, but honestly don’t recall if that was law or company policy (or VSP?).

In any case I believe VSO is now an STCW requirement for all Deck Officers. so all mates should have the qualification.

Just a note on my certification. I received it before the STCW requirement, with the understanding that it would be accepted. Turns out that it was not. But the course gained MARAD recognition and it is now accepted retroactively. But the course was accepted by [B]all[/B] other IMO nations. Go figure.


#5

[quote=CaptAndrew;21709]That is the opposite of my personal experience. I was VSO as Chief Mate and the Captain was my stand in. One of us had to be aboard at all times, but honestly don’t recall if that was law or company policy (or VSP?).

In any case I believe VSO is now an STCW requirement for all Deck Officers. so all mates should have the qualification.

Just a note on my certification. I received it before the STCW requirement, with the understanding that it would be accepted. Turns out that it was not. But the course gained MARAD recognition and it is now accepted retroactively. But the course was accepted by [B]all[/B] other IMO nations. Go figure.[/quote]

The VSO can be a stand alone person. Nothing says it has to be any bridge or engine officer, other than you must have one, same as MPIC. VSP, ISM, or the Company may choose to dictate who that person is. VSO is not a requirement for “all” officers, but the one serving in that capacity.

There are certain sea-time requirements, that NMC may require for the endorsement, but I’m not sure what it is.


#6

[QUOTE=CaptAndrew;21709]In any case I believe VSO is now an STCW requirement for all Deck Officers. so all mates should have the qualification.
[/QUOTE]

Nope, not a requirement for all Deck Officers. Only if you are designated as a VSO, do you have to have taken the course and have the endorsement on your MMC.


#7

The question is:

Is the VSO required to be aboard?..nearby?..down the street?..aboard another vessel?..maybe at home might be okay?

How can that individual oversee the security of the vessel if they’re not onboard.

They would look pretty foolish standing on the dock watching their vessel steam away after being stolen.

As Ricky Ricardo was fond of saying “You gotta lotta s’plainin’ ta do!”


#8

[quote=seadog!;21767]The question is:

Is the VSO required to be aboard?..nearby?..down the street?..aboard another vessel?..maybe at home might be okay?

How can that individual oversee the security of the vessel if they’re not onboard.

They would look pretty foolish standing on the dock watching their vessel steam away after being stolen.

As Ricky Ricardo was fond of saying “You gotta lotta s’plainin’ ta do!”[/quote]

Ih he is overseeing the security on 24/7 basis - he is in breach of minimum rest hours, and this is impossible.
Thats why there are duties assigned to crew on board, starting from deputy vso, down to gangway watch - and its all in ssp.

If vso is “for security reasons” obliged to stay on board at all times, even in safe harbors, not having a shore leave - he is in a kind of slavery relationship with his employer.
It just doesnt work that way.

Standing on dock and watching their vsl sailing, is situation really impossible (how will you steal the vsl of say 50-100-150 thousant tons, with 17 - 25 crew on board? with must-have tugs assistance, possibly tidal window, etc… by bunch of who? Car thiefs? Street thugs?)
In the worst case you will have a hostage situation. Solvable by any special unit such as swat.

Your comment may look funny to some cadet greenhorn, or a lady in the bar, but no more than that.
At least to me.


#9

I’m thinking tugboat world, Master/VSO going grub shopping late at night while most of the crew is asleep. One deckhand on watch (watching porno on his computer), and a disgruntled former employee sees an opportunity he just can’t resist.

No, the guy didn’t steal the boat, but he could have. He just made a big scene (and a big mess). It was all covered up and kept hush hush.

Our VSP is top secret, kept locked in the masters stateroom. I have no idea what it says about VSO going ashore.


#10

I’m thinking tugboat world, Master/VSO going grub shopping late at night while most of the crew is asleep. One deckhand on watch (watching porno on his computer), and a disgruntled former employee sees an opportunity he just can’t resist.

No, the guy didn’t steal the boat, but he could have. He just made a big scene (and a big mess). It was all covered up and kept hush hush.

Our VSP is top secret, kept locked in the masters stateroom. I have no idea what it says about VSO going ashore.


#11

[quote=seadog!;21771]I’m thinking tugboat world, Master/VSO going grub shopping late at night while most of the crew is asleep. One deckhand on watch (watching porno on his computer), and a disgruntled former employee sees an opportunity he just can’t resist.

No, the guy didn’t steal the boat, but he could have. He just made a big scene (and a big mess). It was all covered up and kept hush hush.

Our VSP is top secret, kept locked in the masters stateroom. I have no idea what it says about VSO going ashore.[/quote]

A good story. Reminds me of one in my hometown:
They came with tug, and a barge with 1 crane and load of stones to additionaly reinforce the breakwater of small marina where I keep my ten meter boat.
The barge with rocks, and crane was made fast from seaside of the break water.
The tug made fast inside the marine, just on the entrance corner of breakwater.
The tug master and one and only deck hand were living in neigborhood. I know - They asked me and I made them a favor and drove them home for a good night sleep.
During the night nobody on the barge.
Nobody on the tug left.
A heavy swell came, and barge started smashing in the breakwater.
By daylight they came in panick: Tug was ok, protected. The barge listed, rolling, damaged on bw with water ingress, and some rocks lost overboard.
They manouvered the tug, took somehow the barge in tow.
the barge listed more due to water ingess, and loss of some of deck cargo, and finaly a crane fell overboard - worth of some 1.5 million dollars, and loss of the remaining deck cargo of stones (which were unsecured and unlashed, BTW) - before they make a safe berth in big harbor.
The crane was uninsured.

The captain of the tug, and his good deck hand had good night sleep, and all the explaining to do later.
If somebody remained on board, they could make a good action in time before deteoration of weather.

BTW - in my ocean going vsl the ssp have no instruction if a vso has to stay on board or not.


#12

[QUOTE=seadog!;21767]The question is:

Is the VSO required to be aboard?..nearby?..down the street?..aboard another vessel?..maybe at home might be okay?

How can that individual oversee the security of the vessel if they’re not onboard.

They would look pretty foolish standing on the dock watching their vessel steam away after being stolen.

As Ricky Ricardo was fond of saying “You gotta lotta s’plainin’ ta do!”[/QUOTE]

Bottom line, what does your security plan say? Do what it says and says what you do.

Last ship I worked on, the VSO was not required to be onboard at all times, but somebody with VSO training was. That is how it was written into the DNV approved security plan.


#13

Risk assessments conducted by the VSO will help make sound judgements - mostly common sense ones. A good argument can be made that no crew member should ever get off the ship, for any reason, but that would never fly, at least to the point of keeping crew. Doesn’t really take that much to figure out what you can and can’t do based on the circumstances. The last thing you want is legal mandate that kills flexibility to make sound judgements.