US warship quarantined at sea due to virus outbreak (link)

#1

Apologies if previously posted. Didn’t see it in a search. Happened last month

"(CNN)A US warship has essentially been quarantined at sea for over two months and has been unable to make a port call due to an outbreak of a viral infection similar to mumps.

Twenty-five sailors and Marines aboard the USS Fort McHenry amphibious warship have been diagnosed with parotitis, which causes symptoms similar to mumps, according to US military officials.

Until CNN asked about the incident, the US military had not disclosed it. The illness first broke out in December, with the most recent case being reported on March 9.

“None of the cases are life-threatening and all have either already made or are expected to make a full recovery,” the Fifth Fleet said in a statement provided to CNN." (more at link)

Get your vaccinations, folks

#2

I think the anti vax idea was started by russian spammers, it has been very effective, either that or it was a survey to find out what percentage of people are stupid

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#3

Everyone who joins the military gets nearly every vaccine known to man whether you received it before or not. This shouldn’t have anything to do with that.

#4

Haha, in boot camp we went through a line with sets of steps – two steps up, guy with a hydraulic injector on each side, BAM, step down, shuffle shuffle, step up, BAM etc. If you twitched the stream would cut you instead of making a hole.

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#5

Then they get you again when you deploy.

#6

Never piss off a Corpsman at sea. Be a pity if he lost your shot card…again.

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#7

I was in the Navy from the 70’s to the 90’s and never got a Measles, Mumps, and Rubella shot. So…how does a complication of mumps have nothing to do with vaccination status? Regale us with your medical genius.

Are they giving MMR shots in the Navy today?

#8

It was started by Russian troll bots (as well as nutters like RFK jr) and it took off like a greased bat out of hell. Because yes, a sizable percentage of Americans, regardless of political bent or even level of formal education, are stupid

For you gents reading; mumps can cause permanent sterility.

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#9

"Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella

During the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, measles was one of the principal causes of death among troops. Measles and secondary pneumonias in 1917 led to 48,000 hospitalizations and 1 million lost work days and represented 30 percent of all Army deaths, including combat deaths (44, 137, 138). During 1917 and early 1918, measles and mumps were leading causes of hospitalization and days lost from active service by members of the American Expeditionary Force in Europe (17, 44, 137, 139). During World War II, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella accounted for over 300,000 hospital admissions or restrictions to quarters (140, 141). Even into the 1970s, measles and rubella caused a substantial number of hospitalizations and lost training time at basic training centers (90).

In 1961, Paul Parkman and his colleagues at WRAIR were codiscoverers of the rubella virus, isolating the virus among trainees at Fort Dix (4, 141). Vaccines to prevent measles, mumps, and rubella were licensed in the United States between 1963 and 1969. The Armed Forces Epidemiologicial Board (AFEB) helped to fund development of an attenuated measles vaccine (142). Indeed, the AFEB represented a major national source of grant funding for military and civilian biomedical researchers from the 1940s to the 1970s (10, 11, 53).

For military trainees, rubella vaccine was adopted first, in 1972, with measles vaccine added in 1980 to immunize those who evaded infection as children (10, 143, 144). Mumps outbreaks were less common than were the other two diseases, so mumps immunization was not uniformly adopted until 1991 (11, 145). A varicella policy of screening and as-needed immunization was also adopted in 1991 (11). The Food and Drug Administration licensed varicella vaccine in 1995. Now that a large proportion of basic trainees enter military service immune to these infections because of childhood immunization, the Services are increasingly testing for antibody and exempting those already immune (11, 146–152)."

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#10

I’ll regale you with my medical genius later. Maybe if you asked nicer.

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#11

Very true. When I enlisted in 2007, at Basic Training reception (Fort Benning, GA) I and everyone else was innoculated against just about everything one might be exposed to in the states. Prior to my first deployment (to Iraq) we got innoculated against Smallpox (~15 injections in one small area), and had to take anti-malarial every day while in country. My second deployment (Afghanistan) we were given anti-malarials too, but I never took them, and many others didn’t either. Burn pit fumes did the most damage.

But now, I’m fully protected against just about everything. I’m told my antibody-laden blood is worth a lot should I ever decide to give blood.

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#12

You forgot the part about the sprint to the drill field, pushups to (supposedly) get the circulation going, and guys passing out face down in their puke.

Cheers,

Earl

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#13

I asked very nicely. Maybe you’re just a little sensitive.

So anyway, according to this info on Health.mil, the Navy gets the following shots:

USS Red Rover 1523
James A. Lovell Federal Health Center (FHCC)
Great Lakes, IL 1-847-688-5568/ext. 80437 or 80504

So if they are being quarantined with a mumps complication, I am left wondering if there is a stronger variant of mumps running loose out there. They are getting the MMR shot.

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#14

Quite a long time ago but I could have sworn one of the shots I got was for for Bubonic Plague.

#15

While in Basic Training (2007) I was given the Varicella shot twice, despite my having told them I had chickenpox as a child. All that you listed looks very familiar to my innoculation record. I also got the Smallpox vaccine and have gotten the flu shot/mist each year.

#16

It seemed a bit sarcastic but I am a sensitive guy.

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#17

I received the smallpox shot 3 times in the Army and once as a kid. After getting no reaction on the 4th one the doctor gave me a letter saying I was immune. Also got the anthrax for the Iraqi Freedom. Desert Storm got me a peanut butter shot in the derriere.

#18

You wouldn’t have liked the old version of the forum, then. It was pretty wild in here.

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#19

It took me a while to sign up. Even now I dont stray too much from talking about my book. I’ve already let one guy get me spun up. In my defense, I had a few too many. Set a rule after that not to drink and post.

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#20

Oooh, I learned THAT lesson quite some time ago. . . but I have to admit it is fun watching others do it. . . .back (kind of) to the topic at hand, does anyone still travel with their yellow “shot card”? I still do., and get asked for it whenever I travel to west Africa. . .

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