Understanding China


#761

You interjected the guns angle. As usual, there needs to be balance to your pro-communist, pro-socialism, pro-down with western nations (unless they are part of the “new world order”) propaganda.

The current situation is Singapore is that of a very nice nation/place to live. Situations can and do change…just like they have changed in Venezuela. Not everyone in Singapore (or any other nation for that matter) has the status of rich retired ex-pat who can just scurry back to their home country. Those left behind will lament the day that they allowed their right and ability to defend themselves and their family from an oppressive government to be taken away…just as the person quoted in that article says.


#762

Venezuela is a good example of how socialism can turn a very beautiful country with the World.s second largest oil reserves into an impoverished and extremely dangerous third world shithole.


#763

I agree and I miss the place.

The possibilities that Singapore will go the way of Venezuela is VERY small.
As long as there are good governance, an efficient and corruption free bureaucracy and safe streets, there is not much incentive to riot in the streets, or to arm yourself.

If the present policy of “the third way” between pure capitalism and socialism is maintained and free trade is not disrupted by other people’s squabbling for world dominance, there is little possibility of change in an amazing experiment in social engineering.

I’m old enough and have experienced the “rule of the guns”, both in the Philippines before Marcos, when everybody carried guns and every politician had his own “army” and Indonesia after the Suharto takeover in 1965, when every soldier, policeman and others that carried guns were a law onto themselves.
I also remember and witnessed the race riots in Singapore in the 1960’s, when there were regular pitched battles between Chines, Malays and Indians.

You may prefer that everybody is armed, but most people would rather not have to arm themselves because of mismanagement by Government and corrupt officials.

You two are welcome to have your opinion, I’ll stick to mine.


#764

The legacy of “Lee Can Do”. An enlightened benevolent dictatorship is the most efficient form of government. Let’s hope that it does not mutate in the wrong direction.


#765

some of it has backfired, re the parts where the PAP ensured it must stay in power has removed the power of thought/free thinking from 2 generations, that is now hurting Singapore


#766

The problem of too much security and no hardship causing lack of entrepreneurship and lack of incentive to take risks.

Likewise, the present Government has realised that root learning does not foster innovation, or independent thinking. They are therefore changing the education system to foster such skills in the future generations. They can do that without having to fight opposition and teachers union. Although they have to watch the “Coffeeshop talk”. (aka public opinion)

Young Singaporeans have not experienced the days poverty, or when there were gangsters ruling in Chinatown and hard manual work where the norm, not jobs for the finance industry, Sitting in air-conditioned offices and living in modern Government subsidised flats with all amenities is taken for granted. Driving expensive cars, riding buses, or MRT trains in air-conditioned comfort to get to/from work and play is the norm today. (Not so at independence 50 years ago)

This is not so for many in China, hence they are still more driven to succeed and to compete, both with other countries and between themselves.


#767

And at the expense of ‘others’…

More of that ‘good nationalism’ you talked about before?


#768

China does not have monopoly on detention of “others”, but at least they don’t detain children and babies, after forcibly taking them away from their parents.

But of course that is done to protect the country from an invasion by dangerous people, some of whom may even be “of middle eastern decent”.

Equally obvious is that China should not be allowed to take steps to protect themselves from people who try to separate part of the country by terrorism.
Putting some of them into rehabilitation centres to try to turn them around and become good law abiding members of society is worse then attacking foreign countries, killing thousands of innocent civilians.

They are not being held indefinably without charge even after being found not to have been involved in anything illegal.

BTW; The detainees in Xinjiang are actually Chinese citizen.

It appears that other Muslims are free to travel to China and are doing so in increasing numbers, both as students and tourists:


That just shows how stupid the Chinese are that doesn’t realise that Muslims are all dangerous potential terrorists. (Some of them even “of middle eastern decent”!!)


#769

You are such an absurd apologist for Communist and Totalitarian China. Does Norway require that you register as a foreign agent for China.

What does China do when they catch North Korean families trying to sneak into China? Don’t they detained them, and then hand them over to the North Korean government for execution or re-education in concentration camps?

You are also absurdly anti-American.

I’m sure that in most countries when both parents happen to be arrested and jailed for committing crimes, the children are not taken to jail with the parents. Nor are the children just turned loose on the street. They are turned over to the custody of social services. If suitable family members are willing to care for the children, then after some review process the children will be placed with family. If no suitable family is available to provide care, the children will remain in the custody of social services. I imagine this is how it’s done in most countries.


#770

You are such an absurd apologist for USA policy and hypocrisy. Are you register as a CIA propagandist?

FYI it is not a crime to enter a country to apply for asylum. In fact it is an internationally agreed obligation to allow access until and the asylum claim has been fairly and legally either approved or rejected. This has been a key part of the UNHCR - 1951 Refugee Convention, which USA is a signatory to and instigator of. It is also US Law:
https://www.unhcr.org/1951-refugee-convention.html

In fact Radio Free Asia (sponsored by your friendly CIA) are complaining that North Korean workers are crossing into China, although it is against UN and US sanctions:


They are not getting denied access, or detained by China and not executed when returning home. Thousands of North Koreans actually live in China and have done s for a long time.


#771

North Korean Government sponsorered laborers (essentially slaves) are working in China and Russia to produce revenue for the Kim regime. Those are not people freely traveling across the border to work for their own benefit. Nor are they migrants of refugees. They certainly are not illegal immigrants.


#772

the North Korean slaves are also in Malaysia


#773

I think a more correct description would be approximately 2 million ethnic Koreans live in China. The majority are descendants of those who immigrated in the 17th century and again from the Japanese occupation of the Korean Peninsula.


#774

China got millions of 2nd children roaming china as well without status or any rights
They never talk about this, only locals know about it


#775

There must be at least one non-local person that knows about it; YOU.


#776

true, expats that work in businesses that have low paid labourers know about it
I have a few mandarin speaking friends in the boating business


#777

Shenzhen’s development over 40 years:


#778

Another domino port?

https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/will-china-seize-prized-port-if-kenya-cant-pay-back-its-belt-and-road-loans/


#779

China B and R
Bankrupt and Repossess, what did it stand for originally, I forgot?


#780

So very spot on!