STCWhat?


#1

Hello there,
Was wondering if anyone can help! I’m an English 2nd mate working offshore in the N. Sea but an impending marriage to one of your fine American women is meaning i’m going to/have got to quit this job so i can get the visa to immgrate to Florida from England.
Anyhow, the killer question is (and i fear it will be killer), does anyone know of any way to convert my British STCW '95 ticket to an equivalent USCG ticket so I can continue working in the US Merchant fleet, closer to (my new) home? As far as i know, the USCG don’t hand out CEC’s - so does anyone know if i’d have to go back to school to resit exams? And finally, does anyone know of any organizations or websites that could help us out with info? - Google hasn’t come up with the goods…
Cheers in advance for anyone who can help me with any suggestions.
Taa
Gareth


#2

I don’t know the answer to your question but I have a friend who married a Scottish 2nd engineer and he now lives in Florida and works for Carnival as some kind of safety auditor or something. Pretty sure that he is still using his licenses.


#3

It’s been discussed on here before, but the US dose not recognize any foreign certifications. You can use your sea time to your AB and possibly your 100 ton license, but then have to take all your STCW stuff over again here in the states at the approved schools. Along with applying for you citizenship so you can be an officer.

Your best bet is to keep sailing were you are at right now and fly back and forth, the offshore sector here in the Gulf Of Mexico is pretty tight with no end in sight.


#4

Sorry, not even get a 100ton. You will be able to use the sea-time and qualify for AB and OUPV, which is the entry level. And as stated you will have to redo all your STCW, but not until you become a citizen and can move up the ladder. However you should be able to work closer on a foreign flag vessel Apparently we have a few working in the Gulf of Mexico. :rolleyes: Or try the yachting industry.

There was a recent thread on exactly this question recently and it was answered by Mr Cavo from the USCG. Do a search and it will come up.


#5

An “impending” marriage sounds so romantic.
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#6

Maybe you can get work on one of the many foreign flag cruise ships that sail out of Port Everglades, etc.


#7

Figured your could get a 100 ton as long as you got your citizenship. All you have to do is retake your BST which you have to do to get your AB and take the exam at the REC.


#8

why do northern europeans always go to florida when they come to the USA? I’ve spent tons of time in florida and somehow missed that state’s magnetism. I mean it’s cool and everything, but give me Manhattan any day.


#9

oh yeah, englishmate, as the other posts indicated: no way to transfer your license. sorry. best to stay foreign flag, but no fear lots of opportunities here for that too often with better $$.


#10

Hi guys, thanks for the info - i thought that was the case, not being able to transfer me ticket, but never mind. spose I’ll stay working here in the North Sea till i get married and then look for a shore job in Florida. Could go cruises (I think Disney cruises are European officers) but i’d have to shave everyday, and be presentable - well I’m to stuck in my North Sea ways i think. Might try and have a look for something in the Yachting world. Is it this 6-pax OUPV thing what you need to skipper sailboats, or charter boats?
Anyhow, thanks again. Also, in hindsight ‘upcoming’ would have been a better word than ‘impending’ when describing my marriage - and as for Florida, Well I I think i’d pick a frozen rum beverage in a tiki bar, over a manhattan in manhattan anyday… I’m just not a city bloke I don’t think.
Cheers now for all your help
Gareth


#11

best of luck with your romantic “impending” marriage and the move 30 degrees closer to the equator!!!


#12

contact MPT in fort lauderdale

there school will be able to advise you on what you need to do, they handle things like this all the time as they are set up to help the yachting community and deal with this everyday,

www.mptusa.com

best of luck


#13

[I][quote=englishmate;26069]…does anyone know of any way to convert my British STCW '95 ticket to an equivalent USCG ticket so I can continue working in the US Merchant fleet, closer to (my new) home? [/quote][/I]

See my response to a similar question: http://gcaptain.com/forum/professional-mariner-forum/4029-a.html


#14

It’s ridiculous that the US doesn’t accept licenses from other countries. I could see not accepting them from some of the smaller licenses, but England?

I was working on a Danish flagged ship - it took me a day and a half and almost no work at all to get a Danish license from my US one. Why do we have to be so difficult?


#15

I am an Unlimited Master UK licence and married an American and moved here to the US. The advice above is about right. Until you are a full citizen, (a process taking about 5 years after you’re married) you cannot advance beyond OUPV or AB. I remained foreign flag and would advise you do the same. There is a whole lot more work out there for an MCA license than US as long as you don’t mind being away from home any distance.

You also may not be aware that if you are coming into the US on a K marriage visa you cannot leave again until your green card is processed, as much as 6 months so be prepared!


#16

Well cheers again there chaps. It’s just the way it goes i suppose. I was hoping to be able to work closer to my new home, but never mind. And cheers Mr. Sparra - I did hear that it takes 6 monthish for the ‘green card’ to come through, where you can’t leave (or even work I think). Anyhow, I recon i’ll just ask the company for a years sabattical - and if they laugh me out the office (which inevitably they will) then i’ll have to quit work to come over. Then i’ll just have to see after my first 6 months of marriage whether i really want to go back or not.
In fairness i’ve been wanting an excuse for a while to try ‘something new’ so if this isn’t it - a new life in a new country etc. well I don’t know what is. Land of Opportunity right? And besides - if that doesn’t work out and i end up penniless, well as we North Sea Tigers say, no matter how bad it gets, how skint or down-and-out you are, you can [U]ALWAYS[/U] get a job on a standby boat…
Cheers for the help and good wishes there fellas
Gareth


#17

[QUOTE=englishmate;26179]Well cheers again there chaps. It’s just the way it goes i suppose. I was hoping to be able to work closer to my new home, but never mind. And cheers Mr. Sparra - I did hear that it takes 6 monthish for the ‘green card’ to come through, where you can’t leave (or even work I think). Anyhow, I recon i’ll just ask the company for a years sabattical - and if they laugh me out the office (which inevitably they will) then i’ll have to quit work to come over. Then i’ll just have to see after my first 6 months of marriage whether i really want to go back or not.
In fairness i’ve been wanting an excuse for a while to try ‘something new’ so if this isn’t it - a new life in a new country etc. well I don’t know what is. Land of Opportunity right? And besides - if that doesn’t work out and i end up penniless, well as we North Sea Tigers say, no matter how bad it gets, how skint or down-and-out you are, you can [U]ALWAYS[/U] get a job on a standby boat…
Cheers for the help and good wishes there fellas
Gareth[/QUOTE]
Gareth

you can get something called advanced parole.
Then you can leave the contry as you need to, to keep working
while you wait for your green card.


#18

[quote=westcoast master mariner;26182]Gareth

you can get something called advanced parole.
Then you can leave the contry as you need to, to keep working
while you wait for your green card.[/quote]

Yes Gareth’s right, however the AP is determined on a case by case basis and is intended for sudden bereavements etc… It is usually good for only one re-entry so be careful. I really didn’t think it was worth losing my green card status by screwing the system too much.