STCW Question


#1

The other day in my Basic Safety Training class for my STCW requirement we did our pool work.

Apparently one requirement is to enter the water from a 1 meter platform and from a 3 meter platform.

Guess who has been trying to overcome a paralysing fear of heights/falls for a few years and now has 13 weeks to do it.

Can anyone show me where this requirement is laid out and can anyone tell me if there is hope of having the 3 meter drop waived?

I understand why it would be there (I think), I understand the techniques and the dangers. I also understand if it comes down to staying on a sinking/burning ship and getting my arse off, I’ll be getting off.

Thanks


#2

You are going to have to get over your fear.


#3

Damn. That’s far easier said than done.


#4

Well, you don’t have to get over your fear. You just have to jump.

I’m no expert in paralyzing fears, but I would suggest discussing your issue with the instructor. Together you can come up with a plan that eases your concerns. Or at least makes it possible for you to complete the task. You only have to do it once…

Perhaps a solo pool session would help. Maybe you could bring a boombox and play music, or have someone up on the platform reassuring/distracting you…Or maybe they shouldn’t reassure you, maybe they should act as if the platform you’re on is a burning sinking ship…

Best of luck.


#5

[quote=Sf_deckhand;18750]Well, you don’t have to get over your fear. You just have to jump.

I’m no expert in paralyzing fears, but I would suggest discussing your issue with the instructor. Together you can come up with a plan that eases your concerns. Or at least makes it possible for you to complete the task. You only have to do it once…

Perhaps a solo pool session would help. Maybe you could bring a boombox and play music, or have someone up on the platform reassuring/distracting you…Or maybe they shouldn’t reassure you, maybe they should act as if the platform you’re on is a burning sinking ship…

Best of luck.[/quote]
Look down from that platform and imagine your mother in law directly below you…the only consideration left is head first…or feet first.


#6

I couldn’t pull myself into the 25 person liferaft and had to come back 3 weeks later to try again. I DID get into that raft un-aided that time and got my BST certificate.

What I found out is that every class runs the BST pool portion differently. For instance, the first time I tried we only had to jump from the one meter. But the second time the class was run by MSC and they made us jump only once but from the three meter board. MSC also let their guys get pulled/pushed into the raft as many other schools also allow.

Anyway you may want to call several schools around your area and speak to the instructor. Find out if you can find a school that only makes you jump from the one meter and attend their school. Good Luck, I know you can do it!


#7

[QUOTE=auxiliaryComms;18747]
Can anyone show me where this requirement is laid out and can anyone tell me if there is hope of having the 3 meter drop waived?[/QUOTE]

Sorry, it is totally spelled out, no way around it.

Refer to Section A-VI/1 and Table A-VI/1-1 of the STCW Code, and USCG Policy Letter 14-98 that refers to IMO Course 1.19.


#8

You sure like those policy letters:p


#9

The IMO model Personal Survival Course includes a requirement to jump into the water from a height of 4.5 meters. The NMC will only require that the student demonstrate the proper technique for entering the water from a height of not less than one meter.

Hmmm… I did the 1 meter, apparently there’s no need to do the 3 meter. Its interesting because one instructor here told me I was good with the 1 meter, but the other said he was certain it was both.

Don’t know if that’ll change anything but worth a shot I suppose.


#10

Dude, I feel for you.
Pick out a spot on the opposite wall equal to the height of the platform. All the while keeping your eye on that spot, climb to the platform, step out towards your point and go. Don’t stop, don’t look down.

Something you can try before hand. Walk around with a full cup of coffee in one hand, keeping your eyes on the horizon. Don’t look at it. As soon as you look down, you’ll spill it. It will get you used to trusting your feet- and gain you points when you bring the Capt a full cup of coffee

Yup, easier said than done


#11

Hi, I have two ideas to add hear.

First, youve got problems looking over a 10 feet drop? And what do you tell the captain when he/she tells you to climb up and change the burnt out masthead or one of the Red/white lamps up there. Or sombody says, here is a harness go up there and paint the _____.

What are you going to do on a boat where just about everything is over 10’ including the gangway (brow for you usn/uscg types.) Im not sure how yould be able to do your job.

Second, how to overcome. I think a little Systematic Desensitization is in order. In other words, progressive aproximation of the target behavior :wink:

I hate hights too! They simply just make me fearfull. But I like my AB job more so I just grit my teeth and hang on.
Bob


#12

[I][quote=auxiliaryComms;18747]…Apparently one requirement is to enter the water from a 1 meter platform and from a 3 meter platform.[/I]
[I] …Can anyone show me where this requirement is laid out and can anyone tell me if there is hope of having the 3 meter drop waived? [/quote][/I]

Check the assessments for BST found in NVIC 5-00. Note the applicable assessments at the bottom of page 8 of enclosure (1). They specify a height of [U]one meter[/U].

Any requirement above one meter comes from the school, not the Coast Guard. We will approve a school/course using 3 meters, but we only require one. In fact, we won’t approve anything above 3 meters we feel it presents an unacceptable risk without adding significant “realism” benefits.

The decison to use one meter vice three was in part intended to not excessively limit the number of facilities at which the training could be conducted, very few indoor pools have a three meter platform/board.

You said you have 13 weeks to get this done. Where does that come from? Did the school tell you that is how long you have to complete the course?


#13

Thank you Mr. Cavo,

I am currently in the Basic Officer Training Course for the NOAA Corps, it is a 16 week program from GMATS/USMMA developed to prepare us to be deck officers on NOAA vessels. Rolled in with this 16 weeks are the courses needed to get a 500/1600 ton Mates license.

13 weeks is how much time is left in the course. The instructor who did our pool work was certain both dives were required because of the IMO STCW requirements. He believed the 1 meter was only for inland licensing. Not completing the 3 meter dive would not preclude me from passing the NOAA course, but the instructor wants me to do it because he does not want me to miss the license.

It sounds like even if it is not required he’s not going to let me not do it, just for the personal growth angle.


#14

[quote=bob;18768]Hi, I have two ideas to add hear.

First, youve got problems looking over a 10 feet drop? And what do you tell the captain when he/she tells you to climb up and change the burnt out masthead or one of the Red/white lamps up there. Or sombody says, here is a harness go up there and paint the _____.

[/quote]

Not really, looking is fine jumping/falling from 10 feet is another issue.


#15

be advised that many marine companies have climbing and working from heights incorporated in their job decriptions…have always tried to work arround this when it became an issue…you might not want this to remain a issue though??


#16

[QUOTE=rjbpilot;18758]You sure like those policy letters:p[/QUOTE]

LOL, true that. I do loves me a good policy letter!

Does that make me a nerd, or just confirm it?


#17

Acraphobia is one thing, but back when STCW first came into being, I was in one of the first STCW classes conducted at Piney Point. There were 75 or so prospects in the group that had been going to sea for at least 10 years. At least 10% could not even swim!


#18

[B]From Fran’s (and the USCG’s) policy letter:[/B]
[LEFT]
12. The following proficiencies from the relevant IMO model course have been changed.
a. The IMO model Personal Survival Course includes a requirement to jump into the water from
a height of 4.5 meters. [U]The NMC will only require that the student demonstrate the proper[/U][/LEFT]
[U]technique for entering the water from a height of not less than one meter.[/U]

[B]Ask your instructor for the written Terminal and Enabling Objectives for the Course, if jumping from greater than 1 meter isn’t in there then I don’t see how he can require you to do it.[/B]


#19

Its looking like I may not have to do it. The instructor inquired about the policy letter when I brought it up. He’s going to run it by his boss (the instructor who thought I was clear after the first jump).

He still encourages me to work on it… but I’ve been working on that for years.


#20

Man up dude!! Do you have a night light on in the hallway. Just in case you have a bad dream in the night.

Maybe if someone got up there with you and held your hand and you could both count to three and jump at the same time.