Six months ago today MH370 disapeared and not a clue yet where the plane is

I am certainly glad they mention Amelia Earhart in the article but the difference is that we have a very good idea where to look for her but after at least three undersea searches with the best technology available, no sign of finding here plane yet. In the case of MH370, the size of the search area is literally hundreds if not thousands of times larger.

[B]Eternal Mystery? MH370 Hunt Takes New Course After Six Months[/B]

By Bill Neely First published September 8 2014, 1:51 AM

Not since the American aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart disappeared without a trace over the Pacific 77 years ago has there been a mystery like it.

And in so many respects the disappearance of Flight MH370 exactly six months ago today is a far more profound puzzle.

When Earhart went missing her plane was equipped with radio navigation systems, a Morse code receiver and a voice transmission system, all of which she used until her plane vanished into the sea. But this is rudimentary equipment compared to the highly sophisticated location devices on board the modern Malaysian Airlines jet.

Earhart’s last known position was searched by American Navy ships and naval planes until, at a cost of $4 million, the most intensive search in U.S. history was called off without finding any trace of her or her plane.

But this is a drop in the ocean compared to the tens of millions of dollars (the exact figure isn’t known) spent by a dozen countries scouring a vast area of ocean for the missing Malaysian plane. Hundreds of men working thousands of hours have, for six months now, come up with precisely nothing.

And this bears repeating.

In six months, they have found not a single piece of debris that can be linked to the missing plane. Not a piece of clothing, nor a fragment of a body. Not a slick of oil. Not the slightest trace of a modern passenger jet, manned by an experienced crew, whose path was tracked by the most sophisticated radar equipment modern man has developed.

[B][U]In our hi-tech, inter-connected, satellite-covered world, it is a staggering failure.[/U][/B]

But it’s not for want of trying.

Experts from more than a dozen countries have searched for Flight MH370 with satellites from space, with planes from the air and with ships on the sea. They’ve scoured the ocean floor. On land, they’ve analyzed and re-analyzed the radar data and worked day and night to try to find the missing plane.

The batteries of the plane’s flight recorders, the black boxes, began to fade and die after 30 days; since then, submarines and ships have been all but blind in their search.

After a few weeks of searching, U.S. Navy Captain Mark Matthews suggested it could take years to find the plane because of the lack of information about where to go and the size of an ocean that could take “an untenable amount of time to search.”

He pointed out that the search for the Air France plane that crashed into the Atlantic in 2009 recovered debris within days, yet it still took two years to find the black box and the plane.

And yet the search for MH370 goes on, and in the coming weeks it will enter a new phase.

For months now, ships have been mapping out tens of thousands of square miles at the bottom of the Southern Indian Ocean, an area more unknown to man than the surface of the moon. This has been the preparatory work to a search using submarines that will begin in earnest in October. It will be focused on a 40,000 square mile “priority area” and will last up to a year.

Martin Dolan, chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, which is overseeing the underwater search, says “we remain fully committed to finding the missing aircraft, and although it’s taken us a long time to get there, we’re at a point where we’ve completed almost all the planning work and can move to the operation phase of the underwater search".

There can be no doubting their best intentions; every nation involved, every one of the thousands of people who’ve searched for the plane, has done his and her best.

But try telling that to the distraught relatives of the 239 people who were on board the plane. It’s no comfort.

The families of the 227 passengers have suffered unimaginable anguish; from the early days of mixed messages and media glare, to the silence and indifference of today.

They have no idea how their loved ones died, why, when or where.

The relatives of the 12 crew members have fared little better. At first, some of the crew were suspected of causing the crash. The families of the pilot and co-pilot were questioned about their political beliefs, the theory being that one, or both, had determined to crash the plane deliberately.

Thieves tried to rob the bank accounts of missing passengers.

Flying on Malaysian Airlines became the subject of online and water-cooler comment worldwide, along the lines of “you’re flying Malaysian? Pack a parachute!”

Until a second Malaysian plane fell out of the sky, this one shot down by missile fire in Ukraine.

No one’s joking any more.

But the heartbreak hasn’t ended.

Or the puzzlement. As I flew on two search planes, just 100 feet above the waves, I thought how amazing it was that there are some things modern man just can’t work out; man-made mysteries that are beyond our modern knowledge.

Soon, six months on, another set of vessels will head for the horizon off Western Australia, sailing with the glimmer of hope that they may solve one of the greatest mysteries of our time.

When they say submarines, I wonder if they mean AUVs? No manned sub can operate in anywhere near the depths the plane would lie but AUVs operate at very slow speeds and to mow the lawn over such a massive area will take a similarly massive amount of time. Still that is the best way to do this as it can get the sonars right down to the bottom where they need to be.

I hope that all the parties involved are prepared to pay for years of searching because that is what it will take and more assets than what they are paying for now. Still the likelihood of the plane never being found is very high.

Maybe it’s the plane Russia shot down

[QUOTE=c.captain;143785]I am certainly glad they mention Amelia Earhart in the article but the difference is that we have a very good idea where to look for her but after at least three undersea searches with the best technology available, no sign of finding here plane yet. In the case of MH370, the size of the search area is literally hundreds if not thousands of times larger.

When they say submarines, I wonder if they mean AUVs? No manned sub can operate in anywhere near the depths the plane would lie but AUVs operate at very slow speeds and to mow the lawn over such a massive area will take a similarly massive amount of time. Still that is the best way to do this as it can get the sonars right down to the bottom where they need to be.

I hope that all the parties involved are prepared to pay for years of searching because that is what it will take and more assets than what they are paying for now. Still the likelihood of the plane never being found is very high.[/QUOTE]

Then they need to go back to the drawing board and try and narrow down the possible crash location again because as you said, years of searching= tons of money. Mapping is slow, tedious work.

It’s currently located at 37 14’06" N, 115 48’40"W. It’s being painted up to use in a false flag “terror attack”.

[QUOTE=Fraqrat;143799]It’s currently located at 37 14’06" N, 115 48’40"W. It’s being painted up to use in a false flag “terror attack”.[/QUOTE]

lemme guess without looking up the position…Area 51?

HAH! Got it right…I AM a genius!

I don’t understand the ‘need’ for answers to everything that happens. Could something be learned from plane crashes? Usually, but not always. Investigations are usually more to assign blame than to learn anything. Closure for the families? If they find out that it hit a flock of pelicans (I know far fetched, but bear with me), how does that help them to sleep better at night? The author says the families want answers to “how their loved ones died, why, when or where.” Let me answer that for you. How: in a plane crash Why: because the plane they were flying in quit flying When: 1720 GMT 8March2014 Where: Indian Ocean off of Australia.

See, I just saved hundreds of millions of dollars. We can cancel the search now.

[QUOTE=c.captain;143785] No manned sub can operate in anywhere near the depths the plane would lie …[/QUOTE]

There are around 10 boats that can operate to that depth. However, because range and duration is so limited compared to a ROV or AUV it is not practical to use a manned vehicle unless or until human eyes are needed for some reason.

Manned subs are great for some work but general searching is about the least beneficial use of one.

[QUOTE=Steamer;143839]There are around 10 boats that can operate to that depth. However, because range and duration is so limited compared to a ROV or AUV it is not practical to use a manned vehicle unless or until human eyes are needed for some reason.

Manned subs are great for some work but general searching is about the least beneficial use of one.[/QUOTE]

I worked on a survey ship once or twice. Although the maps produced were secret, the details were amazing. You could see each link on the anchor chains of a sunken ship. I don’t recall the depth to which that resolution / capability existed, but it was some serious stuff. We surveyed at 13 kts, but some ships could survey at faster speeds. So I imagine if the money shakes loose, they will find it over time … But the initial search clearly from the surface - as you say, a basic waste of time to try it from an ROV or AUV.

[QUOTE=+A465B;143843]I worked on a survey ship once or twice. Although the maps produced were secret, the details were amazing. You could see each link on the anchor chains of a sunken ship. I don’t recall the depth to which that resolution / capability existed, but it was some serious stuff. We surveyed at 13 kts, but some ships could survey at faster speeds. So I imagine if the money shakes loose, they will find it over time … But the initial search clearly from the surface - as you say, a basic waste of time to try it from an ROV or AUV.[/QUOTE]

well to use a ship mounted multibeam swath sonar in the depths that MH370 likely lies will require a low frequency one (10-12kHz) which will produce the required radiated power but not the photographic quality resolution although I believe it could identify a large aircraft in 5000m water depth if the plane was not in a large field rough bottom topography. If it is, then any image sent back will show the bottom and likely mask the plane. When I was bidding on the JOHN McDONNELL I has hoping it had a deepsea swath sonar but later discovered it was only good to 1000m (112kHz?) which precluded its use in that search although it would be excellent for nearshore survey work. Speaking of the McDonnell, I know who the new owner is and have spoken with him about hopefully working on her. Since I do not have his permission to divulge his identity here, I will refrain now but hopefully soon be able to say more and do a bit of recruiting as well.

regarding the sonars mounted in the AUVs, they are all high frequency so get a beautiful imagery of the bottom but they work pretty slow. In the deepsea undersea search game, if you don’t have patience, go find another game to play…

[QUOTE=c.captain;143856]well to use a ship mounted multibeam swath sonar in the depths that MH370 likely lies will require a low frequency one (10-12kHz) which will produce the required radiated power but not the photographic quality resolution although I believe it could identify a large aircraft in 5000m water depth if the plane was not in a large field rough bottom topography. If it is, then any image sent back will show the bottom and likely mask the plane. When I was bidding on the JOHN McDONNELL I has hoping it had a deepsea swath sonar but later discovered it was only good to 1000m (112kHz?) which precluded its use in that search although it would be excellent for nearshore survey work. Speaking of the McDonnell, I know who the new owner is and have spoken with him about hopefully working on her. Since I do not have his permission to divulge his identity here, I will refrain now but hopefully soon be able to say more and do a bit of recruiting as well.

regarding the sonars mounted in the AUVs, they are all high frequency so get a beautiful imagery of the bottom but they work pretty slow. In the deepsea undersea search game, if you don’t have patience, go find another game to play…[/QUOTE]

I’m sure you’re keeping your eyeball peeled for McArthur II which should be gracing the pages of the GSA auction site very soon and has a Simrad capable of 12 khz…the Ka’imimoana will be on the auction block, too.

[QUOTE=c.captain;143856]well to use a ship mounted multibeam swath sonar in the depths that MH370 likely lies will require a low frequency one (10-12kHz) which will produce the required radiated power but not the photographic quality resolution although I believe it could identify a large aircraft in 5000m water depth if the plane was not in a large field rough bottom topography. If it is, then any image sent back will show the bottom and likely mask the plane. When I was bidding on the JOHN McDONNELL I has hoping it had a deepsea swath sonar but later discovered it was only good to 1000m (112kHz?) which precluded its use in that search although it would be excellent for nearshore survey work. Speaking of the McDonnell, I know who the new owner is and have spoken with him about hopefully working on her. Since I do not have his permission to divulge his identity here, I will refrain now but hopefully soon be able to say more and do a bit of recruiting as well.

regarding the sonars mounted in the AUVs, they are all high frequency so get a beautiful imagery of the bottom but they work pretty slow. In the deepsea undersea search game, if you don’t have patience, go find another game to play…[/QUOTE]

Cool. Thanks for the information.