Sea Service credit in foreign country on personal watercraft

U.S. citizen working towards Master 100 Ton. Going to Croatia in a few weeks. Will do lots of boating on the Adriatic. I know sea service is creditable on foreign flag vessels (per CFR) but will my time count towards my MMC in a small boat (12 foot inflatable with motor) in a different country?

I hope not! :wink:

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I don’t think it would count if done here in US inland waters. Certainly hope not.

Does Power Wheel drive time count toward a drivers license?

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What’s Power Wheel ?!?

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I don’t know about creditable time for Master, but it’s my understanding that Dinghy-1/4 Ton is equivalent time for Second Captain OSV in the gulf.

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I think you actually can do this.

It seems like there is an “under 25 ton category” with no lower limit. I am not sure how this goes into a 100 ton license though, but it might get you a 6-pack. Is the OP planning on spending all day in a dinghy though? He needs 8 hours or maybe 4 in a day to make a day for logging it, that is actually a long time to be in a rubber boat.
You may have an issue with who signs off on it. I have signed off on a few service letters for people who crewed on my boat and I can sign off my own time on my own boat that I own, but running around in a dinghy that does not belong to me and does not have an owner aboard seems to fall through the cracks, it would be kind of like trying to get sea service time for renting a jet-ski in Cancun or something :rofl:

  • honestly I would NOT do this dinghy thing nor claim rental jetski time. You just might raise a red flag about exactly what is going on and have someone go digging into everything you claim.
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I don’t think that applies over here; if it did I could have got my qualifying time in by pub crawling in my old wooden river boat.

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The OP wants time for a US license. I very much could get a license based on pub crawling in a wooden river boat, but it would be limited in both tonnage and area. The guy that runs around in the water taxi in Annapolis might have rounded Cape Horn, but he also could have got all his time in a Boston Whaler chasing kids up and down the Severn River.

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Thanks for taking the time out to answer this. Good advice.

But surely, if you are manoevring in a rigid inflatable, then, by definition, because it is inflatable, there is no tonnage involved.

Just as an aside; passenger carrying hovercraft?
Funny as fuck when it is windy.

So, how can you be qualified on a tonnage basis on something that has no designated tonnage?
My comment about fart arsing about in my river boat were based on me being a dickhead; don’t ever take me too seriously.
And, just as an aside, I take The Admiral out, within the confines of the non-tidal waters that my insurance provider allows me, but I still have no defense against the floating stag parties

Also, how do you get tonnage on a submarine?

You claim the tonnage you sink?

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If you fill an inflatable with helium, is that negative tonnage? Do you lose sea time instead of gain it? Leave a 200 ton captain, come back a 6-pack?

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“Personal Watercraft” to the USCG is a jet ski … just saying

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Just put a little tiny walk in engine room around the outboard and you can be a chief.

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Google agrees

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Add a cooler and a camping stove and be the cook too :smiley:

My question is whether plastic paddles qualify as legitimate means of propulsion or do they have to be made out of wood. Asking for a friend.

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