Recommended Books on Leadership or Management

In the thread The Cain Mutiny someone mentioned the book that the movie is based on is a good book to read for people in command. That made me wonder what other books there are that teach leadership or management techniques (preferably without getting too deep in technical jargon).

Does anyone have any recommendations?

I’m sure you’ll get a good one at your leadership and management class.

and

Resonant Leadership by Annie McKee. It has a red cover.

I’m about 1/2 way through it. The first chapter was kind of tough to get through (boring), but it’s a good book. Changes your perspective on leadership and is backed up with scientific studies.

Leading at The Edge: Leadership Lessons from the Extraordinary Saga of Shackleton’s Antarctic Expedition.

The Leadership 5 day at NMI was based around it. Turned out to be a very good read.

In Search of Excellence - Tom Peters & Robert Waterman

http://www.businessballs.com/tompetersinsearchofexcellence.htm

I really dislike a lot of leadership books aimed at business readers. One book that seems a bit stale and cliched to me now is Principle Centered Leadership by Covey. I did get a lot out of it when I first read it.

Other areas worthwhile are decison making and cognitive bias. I read Superforecasting last trip and it covers a lot of ground in those areas and is a good entertaining read.

Nate Silver’s The Signal and the Noise is a quick, easy read and worthwhile.

The One Minute Manager Kenneth Blanchard
The Checklist Manifesto Atul Gawande
Good to Great Jim Collins
Execution (The discipline of getting things done)Larry Bossidy
What got you here won´t get you there Marshall Goldsmith
How to win friends and influence people Dale Carnegie (It even works on C.Captain)

I read the Checklist Manifesto and was able to change a lot of things of the TSMS of the company.

Simplify things and avoid to much “pencil whipping” on all the numerous reports that was handed down to a company with little culture of reports other than a log book.

y’all need only one book…MINE! available at www.crustyoldfarts.com

you can also get your Redwings there too!

[QUOTE=c.captain;180266]y’all need only one book…MINE! available at www.crustyoldfarts.com

you can also get your Redwings there too![/QUOTE]

Unfortunately this doesn´t work anymore. Your book was the first one of many I have read. It does have its high points and place, but not the best read.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;180269]Unfortunately this doesn´t work anymore. Your book was the first one of many I have read. It does have its high points and place, but not the best read.[/QUOTE]

BAH! Whatta you know?

[QUOTE=c.captain;180270]BAH! Whatta you know?[/QUOTE]

I know a couple of things…

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;180272]I know a couple of things…[/QUOTE]

well if you know how to find your own ass with both hands you’re far ahead of me!

[QUOTE=c.captain;180275]well if you know how to find your own ass with both hands you’re far ahead of me![/QUOTE]

I do believe that is an understatement!

It took me a couple of passes to get what this book was about. Why Great Leaders Don’t Take Yes for an Answer: Managing for Conflict and Consensus

I liked it because it used the climb on Everest that was written about in Into Thin Air which I’ve read.

There is an excerpt of the first chapter from that book here. From that excerpt.

This reminds me of El Faro Thread, Why bother trying to understand how the incident happened? Cleary a string of stupid errors.

When we read about a CEO’s failed strategy in Business Week, or analyze the actions of the manager profiled in a case study at Harvard Business School, we often ask ourselves: How could that individual make such a stupid decision? My students ask themselves this question on numerous occasions each semester as they read about companies that falter or fold. Perhaps we think of others’ failures in these terms because of our hubris, or because we might need to convince ourselves that we can succeed when embarking upon similar endeavors fraught with ambiguity and risk. Jon Krakauer, a member of Rob Hall’s 1996 Everest expedition, wrote, [B][U]"If you can convince yourself that Rob Hall died because he made a string of stupid errors and that you are too clever to repeat those errors, it makes it easier for you to attempt Everest in the face of some rather compelling evidence that doing so is injudicious.[/U][/B]"8

Anything about Ernest Shakelton. He was a true bad ass and excellent leader. His book is called South and it’s free on kindle, Endurance is another excellent book about him and his party of explorers.

[QUOTE=Capt. Lee;180277]I do believe that is an understatement![/QUOTE]

of course it is, I am a master of understatement…

and one leadership trait as a master that I have learned is that if you can self deprecate and crack jokes about yourself in front of your minions, it really helps them feel comfortable in your presence which pays many dividends when you want them to form into a team and get behind you. Nobody will perform their best if they feel intimidated and belittled by a leader who believes himself to be better than everyone beneath him and acts accordingly…

if that doesn’t work, I recommend a pair of these.

.

YEAH! and Quentin McHale too!

I can strongly recommend “It’s Your Ship” by Captain Michael Abrashoff.