QMED Testing Requirements

One of our tankerman on our ship just got approved to test for his qmed rating. What will he have to study and what will he be tested on? He has his AB but he is very intrested in the Engine side of things

If he can I would recommend that he get the RFPEW Assessments signed off to go along with his QMED. I believe for just his QMEd he needs to pass the “general” test as well as the “oiler” test. There is a seperate test for each rating and you need to pass the “general” test before you can test for the extra ratings. I think each test is 70 questions. Plenty of places online to get the questions and study material. Good Luck

[QUOTE=linky2121;64104]One of our tankerman on our ship just got approved to test for his qmed rating. What will he have to study and what will he be tested on? He has his AB but he is very intrested in the Engine side of things[/QUOTE]

The QMED exams are very basic. I’d recommend purchasing the QMED study CD from Chris Dady at www.hawsepiper.net The first test is safety, basically all firefighting and first aid type questions. Once the first exam is passed (70% passing grade with 50 questions) then the individual ratings exams are taken. Each exam has 50 questions. If you take them all and pass, you’ll be given QMED- ALL RATINGS, which is the same as any unlicensed engine rating.
Good luck.

I don’t think you can get all ratings unless you have steamship seatime as there are a couple that require it. I would take every rating module you can though.

Hello, In order to get Engineman and Deck Engine Mechanic ratings you need to fulfill these requirements;

For Engineman:
E(1) Satisfactory documentary evidence of sea service of 6 months in any one or combination of junior engineer, fireman/watertender or oiler on steam vessels of 4,000 horsepower or over; or,

(2) Documentary evidence from an operator of a partially automated steam vessel that he has completed satisfactorily at least 2 weeks indoctrination and training in the engine department of a partially automated steam vessel of 4,000 horsepower or over; or

(3) Satisfactory completion of a course of training for engineman acceptable to the Commanding Officer, National Maritime Center.

For Deck Engine Mechanic:
(a) An applicant for an endorsement as deck engine mechanic shall be a person holding an MMC or MMD endorsed as junior engineer. The applicant shall be eligible for such certification upon furnishing one of the following:

(1) Satisfactory documentary evidence of sea service of 6 months in the rating of junior engineer on steam vessels of 4,000 horsepower or over; or,

(2) Documentary evidence from an operator of an automated vessel that he has completed satisfactorily at least 4 weeks indoctrination and training in the engine department of an automated steam vessel of 4,000 horsepower or over; or,

(3) Satisfactory completion of a course of training for deck engine mechanic acceptable to the Commanding Officer, National Maritime Center.

Hope that helps.

Interesting. I recently took my qmed electrician and only took 1 70 question test. It involved damage control and electrical questions primarily. I used the free online study guide from seasources.net. Maybe that would help him. He could always call his local REC and ask about his test. They will tell him.

QMED Electrician isn’t considered a watchstanding rating, I think only Oiler & Jr Engineer are. Maybe thats why???

[QUOTE=Martilyo;64164]Interesting. I recently took my qmed electrician and only took 1 70 question test. It involved damage control and electrical questions primarily. I used the free online study guide from seasources.net. Maybe that would help him. He could always call his local REC and ask about his test. They will tell him.[/QUOTE]

Did you take another QMED test in the previous year? If so, you might not have had to take the general subjects/safety module as it is common to all QMED exams.

[QUOTE=jdcavo;64194]Did you take another QMED test in the previous year? If so, you might not have had to take the general subjects/safety module as it is common to all QMED exams.[/QUOTE]

No, but my electrician’s test did consist of damage control and safety questions as well.

[QUOTE=Kingrobby;64174]QMED Electrician isn’t considered a watchstanding rating, I think only Oiler & Jr Engineer are. Maybe thats why???[/QUOTE]

That is a very good possibility.

[QUOTE=Martilyo;64198]No, but my electrician’s test did consist of damage control and safety questions as well.[/QUOTE]

I should have thought of this before I asked the last question. About two years ago the general questions were added to the rating-specific module and the general module was eliminated. So it’s now one module, it used to be two.

The Oiler exam isn’t too difficult. I would recommend using Seasources.net for studying. When I took it, the hardest part was the steam questions, as I worked on a diesel electric with no auxiliary boilers. The Basic Safety Training courses (Firefighting, Water Survival, First Aid) cover much of the generals. Basic knowledge of electricity, diesels, starting systems, tools, bearings, piping, fittings, valves, machining, lubes, steering, etc.

I’d really recommend going to Seasources, going through the Oiler questions, and studying anything that you have trouble with, don’t understand, or haven’t seen much of.

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hey kingrobby you seem to know some things i was told that working on a crew/supply boat working 12 hour shifts is good for a day and as half when it comes to see time do you know if that is true or not o and yea its a 90 ton m/v with a rating of 5000 horse also if you could tell me what are the schools around louisana that cost the less?i am waiting on my m.m.d and i have true 155 days of see time but if that is true then i should have 232 days o yea would you know where i can get just the study material for oiler cause the book i got covers every thing up to steam any way let me know what you think signed eddiefreddie

Hey Eddie, What I wrote was straight out of the CFR’s. Thats where you will find answers for all your questions. Read them, learn them, hate them. :slight_smile: 12hr days and the time & a half question gets confusing. Other people will know more about it than me. There have been lots of cases where people work 12hr days, but don’t get credit for it. It has something to do with working a normal 8hr day and then working 4 hrs of overtime, as opposed to working a straight required 12hr day without overtime. During my internship I worked a straight 12hr day.

I’ve never been to Luisiana, so I have absolutely no clue about schools down there. If you are working there ask around and talk to some people.

I just did a quick search and found these places on line for study guides.
http://www.marineradvancement.com/QMEDOiler.htmL

http://www.brownley-nautical.com/engineeringstudyprep.html

http://www.seasources.net/QMED.htm

Good Luck