Noble Globetrotter II - Stuck in Hurricane Ida

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I think this is an old picture, from a different incident, on a different ship, some time back.

I could be wrong.

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Yup. Hard to rely on what one sees on the Internet. . . .

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Not just the internet, same photos being shown in the news media.

Here’s another:

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FWIW, TinEye doesn’t show any matches.

Earl

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Last I knew they were not the same person but things could have changed in the last few years.

No loyalty towards companies, or companies towards employees, this is going to be fun to watch. Get your popcorn ready.

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If that is still the case the captain didn’t have a ship until the OIM give him one.

What a bunch of babies, is this your first hurricane? grow some testicular fortitude. Get out there and clean up the boat then get back to work.

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Joe Boss speaks!

I don’t know if you were being fictitious or not but I do know this. Mariners will complain if their vessel is in port for a hurricane. Mariners will complain if their vessel is offshore during a hurricane. Some mariners will sue their employers if they get sea sick near a hurricane. But mariners complain the most when the subject of autonomous ships is brought up because they don’t want automation systems that don’t complain, who aren’t afraid of hurricanes stealing their jobs.

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Globetrotter crew and management had plenty of notice bad shit was headed their way. Ships can move, land does not.

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Some new details in this article:

Sounds like the flooded space was a cofferdam around the moon pool.

The article goes to lengths to attempt to explain away the damage. $10 million deductible, impact on the bottom line etc, and of course, concern for safety of the crew. Forth and finally don’t anyone forget who signs your paycheck.

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Fourth, and finally, is destined to be a trending new catch phrase … for example when penning a 2 weeks notice letter you can list several reasons why you don’t want to work for a company anymore … #fourthandfinally #takethisjobandshoveit

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So is the OIM in command when the ship is on station and hooked to the drill gear and the ship’s master only in command when it is a free floating ship?

Basically. Different companies structure it differently. On some the captain is the OIM.

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I was Captain at Noble for five years. I was on the DP semi-submersible, Noble Danny Adkins. On the semi’s there was a Captain and an OIM/Rig Manager. The Captain was the PIC, ultimate work authority, etc. As with any other vessel the Captain was ultimately responsible for the safety and well being of all those aboard and for the vessel itself. It didn’t matter whether we were latched up or not. On the Noble drillships such as the Globetrotter II the Captain was also the OIM. Perhaps, that has changed over the last six years. Of the five years I was Captain at Noble, we were on contract to Shell for four of those years. They were very pro safety at that time. The fact that what took place on the Globetrotter II was under a Shell contract is very surprising to myself as well as other colleagues who also worked under Shell. The underlying question as to how and why the vessel was in such a terrible position has yet to be answered. I have heard one narrative that they botched the T-time. Personally, I don’t believe that. The bottom line is there is no excuse for the crew and vessel to be put in such a position. It isn’t as if they didn’t know that storm was out there and intensifying. Shame on all of them and, in particular, the Captain. This scenario is eerily similar to that of the Deepwater Asgard last October. The “culture” of Noble Drilling is as dirty as it gets. Over the past several months I have had two conference calls with the USCG’s 8th District in New Orleans as it pertains to the overall lack of safety culture within the offshore drilling industry. One of those calls involved officials from BSEE. I specifically referenced Noble as well as the situation with the Deepwater Asgard. The reality is that these regulatory agencies have enabled the derelict and dangerous cultures that are pervasive in this industry. These companies know that no one will hold them accountable and until there is accountability within the management of these corporations, as well as with the mariners who neglect their duties, events such as the Noble Globetrotter II and the Deepwater Asgard will continue to occur.

Jeff Hagopian
Cell: 978-764-3908
Email: jbhagop@yahoo.com

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Not in the drilling industry, what is"T-time"?

It is a calculation of time to safely evacuate the area based on the position and track of the storm taking into account the time to secure from the drilling operations at hand.

Jeff Hagopian
Cell: 978-764-3908
Email: jbhagop@yahoo.com

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Thank you. I was unaware Noble treated drill ships and semi-submersibles differently.

Fourth and finally, let see what the USCG and BSEE have to say about your competence to manage and operate ultra Deepwater Drillships.