Maine Maritime's Associate Degree Program


#1

I have a few questions about Maine Maritime’s AAS in Small Vessel Operations. Is anyone familiar with the program? What tonnage licenses are you eligible for after you complete the associates degree programs? Are there additional licenses/endorsements you can earn while studying at Maine Maritime? Since it’s a two year program, how does that work with regards to the Regiment of Cadets? Are you a 4/C your first year and a 3/C your second (and final) year? Any information would be helpful. Thanks in advance. Just an FYI, this is not a duplicate post, I asked the same questions in the SUNY forum about SUNY. I’m a New Hampshire native so I’d prefer Maine Maritime, but am examining my options.


#2

[quote=Jon;27448]I have a few questions about Maine Maritime’s AAS in Small Vessel Operations. Is anyone familiar with the program? What tonnage licenses are you eligible for after you complete the associates degree programs? Are there additional licenses/endorsements you can earn while studying at Maine Maritime? Since it’s a two year program, how does that work with regards to the Regiment of Cadets? Are you a 4/C your first year and a 3/C your second (and final) year? Any information would be helpful. Thanks in advance. Just an FYI, this is not a duplicate post, I asked the same questions in the SUNY forum about SUNY. I’m a New Hampshire native so I’d prefer Maine Maritime, but am examining my options.
[/quote]

The 2-year program at Maine leads to a license as Mate 200 Tons Near Coastal, no STCW. The 2-year program at SUNY leads to Mate 500 Tons Near Coastal or Oceans w. STCW. Others can opine as to which is better.


#3

I believe that you would not be part of the student regiment if you take the AAS program.


#4

No regiment for either the 2 or 4 year SVO programs, along with about half the other majors in the school.

2 year you get a 200 GRT near coastal mates license, and a 100 GRT master inland, as well as a few stcw endorsements, and an AB-special.

For the 2 year you need 120 days of seatime, in addition to the classwork, 60 of which are required during the coop you do between the academic years.

4 year is a 500 GRT mate nc or oceans depending on seatime.

you can also start out with the 2 year, and change to the 4 year later, as you will take the same courses for the first 2 anyway.


#5

Good to know. Thanks.


#6

Why not get the Unlimited License? SVO students take most of the same classes anyway. Yeah, the Regiment sucks and Cruise can be hit or miss, but I remember when companies came recruiting to Maine and most of the interest was in the the Unlimited students.


#7

Because some married thirty year old combat veterans don’t want to deal with 19-20 year old “Midshipmen” on a power trip, whom have never done anything or been anywhere, crapping on them, and then paying $20K a year for the privilege? Just a thought.

Otherwise it might just be more convenient to them if their only desire is to work in small vessels in coastwise trade? Why pay for a four year degree if you’re only looking for a lower level license?


#8

There were several veterans there when I went through. The Regiment at Maine is viewed as a necessary evil by most of the student body, so it is not a particularly intense experience. Also, as a married veteran you would be allowed to live off campus which would mean that you would not have to worry about 80% of the bullshit that the Regiment can produce. If you made it through the military the Regiment shouldn’t challenge you at all. It really isn’t that intense and being off campus your life would be much better.

I have lots of friends that are now sailing on tugs with unlimited licenses, just because you go through the unlimited program doesn’t mean you have to work deep sea. Why pay between 50% or a 100% of the tuition that an unlimited student pays and then receive a license that greatly limits your opportunities? Additionally, if Maine is not issuing the smaller licenses with STCW I wouldn’t waste my time or money at the school.

While my experience is anecdotal, I remember when companies would come to the school recruiting and they were much more interested in the unlimited kids, including tug companies.

I wouldn’t let the Regiment keep you out of pursuing the unlimited license, look at the curriculum for the 500 ton and the unlimited programs, they are almost identical, with the big differences being the Regiment and Cruise.

Whatever you do make sure you ask the school about the Towing Endorsement and if they offer a way to obtain while at school or to get a head start on it. Maine offered a tug and barge class while I was there that was always popular and very good from what I was told.


#9

Actually the last few years the demand for svo students has tended to be higher. Yes all the stcw is the same. The coast guard exams are the same too.

Now the coast guard says that if you pass 500 grt mate oceans its good for 3/m also so its just a matter of unlimited tonnage seatime.

The best bet is to do whichever program more suits your goals, its possible to switch either up or down later if you change your mind.

In regards to the towing class, both limited and unlimited students can take the class. If you complete it successfully you end up with a TOAR.


#10

Hey man how’s it going? I graduated from the 2 year SVO in 2008. I see that you recently got the 200ton NC as well and I have an important question for you. How much seatime did you have when you graduated? Why is this important? Because if you only had 120, (not 360) then when it comes time to upgrade you will be at a 240 day disadvantage. I’m in the process of finding out how to use my non-underway sea time (2/3 of the 200ton mate requirements) to upgrade to a 200 master after working under my mates license for 360 days. I will not accept the fact that when I got my license I still needed another 240 days just to be considered “qualified” for the license. SVO 200ton recipients deserve to upgrade to master after obtaining an additional 360 seadays just like someone who got that license from the hawspipe method. If I find out this is not the case then I’m going to be livid. What are your thoughts on this?


#11

[QUOTE=mainemaritimesucks;30993]Hey man how’s it going? I graduated from the 2 year SVO in 2008. I see that you recently got the 200ton NC as well and I have an important question for you. How much seatime did you have when you graduated? Why is this important? Because if you only had 120, (not 360) then when it comes time to upgrade you will be at a 240 day disadvantage. I’m in the process of finding out how to use my non-underway sea time (2/3 of the 200ton mate requirements) to upgrade to a 200 master after working under my mates license for 360 days. I will not accept the fact that when I got my license I still needed another 240 days just to be considered “qualified” for the license. SVO 200ton recipients deserve to upgrade to master after obtaining an additional 360 seadays just like someone who got that license from the hawspipe method. If I find out this is not the case then I’m going to be livid. What are your thoughts on this?[/QUOTE]
This is exactly what I am worried about. I’m in the four year program though. I’m sure i will get screwed over either way. should have gone unlimited i guess


#12

[QUOTE=Mainema89;35631]This is exactly what I am worried about. I’m in the four year program though. I’m sure i will get screwed over either way. should have gone unlimited i guess[/QUOTE]

. . . Yup.

Also, any joe smoe with a little bit of determination and hard work can graduate a semester early. . . at least that was the case when I went to MMA. I started fall 05 and graduated (academically) MTO in DEC 07. I had to ‘pass’ my cadet shipping before I got my license issued, so I guess you could argue it took me 3 years. I have other degrees and 10 years through the hawspipe to bring to the table, but even if you don’t- schedule it right and you can save yourself a semester tuition.


#13

[QUOTE=Jon;28558]Because some married thirty year old combat veterans don’t want to deal with 19-20 year old “Midshipmen” on a power trip, whom have never done anything or been anywhere, crapping on them, and then paying $20K a year for the privilege? Just a thought.

Otherwise it might just be more convenient to them if their only desire is to work in small vessels in coastwise trade? Why pay for a four year degree if you’re only looking for a lower level license?[/QUOTE]

Not having to deal with that crap was an important decision in choosing an academy for me. Have you looked at Great Lakes Maritime? It’s three or four years depending on if you have a degree, for deck you get the usual license and a great lakes pilot license. They also have a lot of older students I believe they told me the average age was 27, and about half are just out of high school.

If you don’t want to spend a lot of time and money you could also check out MITAGS in Maryland, or PMI on the west coast.


#14

Do not limit yourself to a 200 ton license unless all you want to do is drive small fishing charters. A 200 ton license is practically worthless in the workboat fleet because a TOAR is no good with it. I did 500 ton SVO and regretted it before I graduated. Now I regret it more because I am upgrading and being told that the 540 days I got by attending school is only valid for my original license. (Yet they give the 3rd mates 1080 days just from graduating.)

MMA is a great school but SVO is a horrible decision. (And there are a lot of older regimental students. When I was there there was a retired Army drill sergeant and even a unlimited master in the regiment.


#15

I will add that I believe SVO to give a better ultimate education because of extra classes we take like Workboat Operations (basically Shiphandling II) and SVO students are required to take Diesel I and II and a class on electrical wiring and pumps. Take those ad Tug and Barge as electives and major in MTO and get the 3rd Mate license and the better education. (Also, there is supplemental seamanship Mon - Thur afternoons from 4-6pm in the fall where you can get extra hands on experience running boats. A lot of Regimental kids don’t take advantage of this.)