MacArthur for sale

I saw an ad in a high end yacting magazine featuring Blackwater’s anti-pirate rig. It is listed as an “Expedition Yacht” but no price was given. I wonder if the helo’s and armory goodies come with it?

What was the price tag on that thing?

I’d buy it :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=CampbellsChunkySoupra;15385]What was the price tag on that thing?

I’d buy it :)[/QUOTE]

You don’t want that boat! It was a POS way back in the 80s when I was sailing for NOAA. Can’t even imagine what shape it is now.

No price listed . . . perhaps a campaign donation?

Yea! I want to go pirate hunting on a vessel that might do 9 kts downhill with the wind! I sailed on her sistership a couple of years ago (survey vessel) which is what they are good for. I happen to be at the yard as she was being completed. Looks good from afar, but far from good - especially to hunt pirates!!!

She’s still for sale. 8-06

Anyone have a copy of the ad or know which magazine it was in?

she on YachtWorld at http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1966/Norfolk-Shipbuilding-Expedionary-Yacht-1836107/Valencia/Spain

[B]183’ Norfolk Shipbuilding Expedionary Yacht[/B]

[ul]
[li]Year: 1966 [/li]> [li][B]Current Price: US$ 3,900,000[/B] [/li]> [li]Located In Valencia, Spain [/li]> [li]Hull Material: Steel [/li]> [li]Engine/Fuel Type: Twin Diesel [/li]> [/ul]

Cool little ship, but no anti piracy patrol vessel that’s for sure!

btw, do you know that Mr Blackwater himself, Eric Prince, is being investigated for murdering people providing info to Federal Proscecutors on the dirty deeds not done dirt cheap by his private army?

I find it interesting to see the negative comments about the McArthur and her sister ship, the Davidson. I know both vessels very well and have to say in their defense that they both were refitted to meet the demands of the owners. Both ships I have sailed aboard and yes they are old but both vessel are ABS classed A1 ice strengthened with loadline. As you should know that marks a level of condition that you CANNOT drop below and still hold class.

While the ships were in NOAA’s fleet they did not hold ABS class as that is not a requirement that NOAA has to meet being a civilian branch of the military (military have their own standards). Because of this they were not well kept and ended up being decommissioned from the NOAA’s fleet. After the Davidson’s refit it was hired back and performed NOAA surveys for another 8 years. Interesting use of tax paying money… basic scheme for new ships in the fleet… but another story.

It is a hard task to bring a vessel into ABS class when it never held it. Given the condition of the ships ABS allowed them to enter class which is a testament to their quality and condition. Both ships do 12 knots just fine, that is their cruising speed. I find it amusing when people make broad statements based off of pure ignorance. If you disagree with me I would be happy to discuss but I guarantee you based off you comments I know more about these vessels, ABS requirements, ship building and operation then you. Both vessels are old, yes you can’t get around that, but totally fit for use and great performing pieces of machinery they are. It all depends on who operates and cares for them. Remember if you are in ABS class you are held to the same standards of condition a brand new ship in class is. There are some variations based off of grandfather rules but as far as condition it is the same.

[quote=burn626;18880]I find it interesting to see the negative comments about the McArthur and her sister ship, the Davidson. I know both vessels very well and have to say in their defense that they both were refitted to meet the demands of the owners. Both ships I have sailed aboard and yes they are old but both vessel are ABS classed A1 ice strengthened with loadline. As you should know that marks a level of condition that you CANNOT drop below and still hold class.

While the ships were in NOAA’s fleet they did not hold ABS class as that is not a requirement that NOAA has to meet being a civilian branch of the military (military have their own standards). Because of this they were not well kept and ended up being decommissioned from the NOAA’s fleet. After the Davidson’s refit it was hired back and performed NOAA surveys for another 8 years. Interesting use of tax paying money… basic scheme for new ships in the fleet… but another story.

It is a hard task to bring a vessel into ABS class when it never held it. Given the condition of the ships ABS allowed them to enter class which is a testament to their quality and condition. Both ships do 12 knots just fine, that is their cruising speed. I find it amusing when people make broad statements based off of pure ignorance. If you disagree with me I would be happy to discuss but I guarantee you based off you comments I know more about these vessels, ABS requirements, ship building and operation then you. Both vessels are old, yes you can’t get around that, but totally fit for use and great performing pieces of machinery they are. It all depends on who operates and cares for them. Remember if you are in ABS class you are held to the same standards of condition a brand new ship in class is. There are some variations based off of grandfather rules but as far as condition it is the same.[/quote]

Well said, but were the main engines, shafts and wheels refit to justify being used as a piracy interdiction vessel? Like gas turbine engines, adequate drive reduction, etc. 12 knots cruising speed is kinda slow to be trying to run down a pirate vessel or even to keep up with the ships she is trying to protect which most do over 18 knots. Most ship’s Masters will want to transit pirate waters as quickly as possible and not want to wait around for a 12 knotter to catch up…don’t cha think?..

[quote=burn626;18880]I find it interesting to see the negative comments about the McArthur and her sister ship, the Davidson. I know both vessels very well and have to say in their defense that they both were refitted to meet the demands of the owners. Both ships I have sailed aboard and yes they are old but both vessel are ABS classed A1 ice strengthened with loadline. As you should know that marks a level of condition that you CANNOT drop below and still hold class.

While the ships were in NOAA’s fleet they did not hold ABS class as that is not a requirement that NOAA has to meet being a civilian branch of the military (military have their own standards). Because of this they were not well kept and ended up being decommissioned from the NOAA’s fleet. After the Davidson’s refit it was hired back and performed NOAA surveys for another 8 years. Interesting use of tax paying money… basic scheme for new ships in the fleet… but another story.

It is a hard task to bring a vessel into ABS class when it never held it. Given the condition of the ships ABS allowed them to enter class which is a testament to their quality and condition. Both ships do 12 knots just fine, that is their cruising speed. I find it amusing when people make broad statements based off of pure ignorance. If you disagree with me I would be happy to discuss but I guarantee you based off you comments I know more about these vessels, ABS requirements, ship building and operation then you. Both vessels are old, yes you can’t get around that, but totally fit for use and great performing pieces of machinery they are. It all depends on who operates and cares for them. Remember if you are in ABS class you are held to the same standards of condition a brand new ship in class is. There are some variations based off of grandfather rules but as far as condition it is the same.[/quote]

Not to be argumentative but when was the last time you were on the Davidson? I sailed on her from Nov 06 - Mar 07; 2 days after coming aboard we had our 5 yr COI. Things were pretty borderline until we charged the firemain and the rotted firemain piping blew out in the engine room, just downstream of the firepump. At that point the Inspector “politely” told us to call him when we wre ready and walked off the boat. We eventually got everthing fixed that we needed to in order to get permission to proceed to San Juan and conduct the COI there. Yes we ultimately passed. As for the speed, I don’t ever recall breaking 10 knots although we got close once when we had a following current! That being said, it is not the steel that makes for a good boat, it is the crew that sails her and I have to say that on that trip she was one hell of a good, fun, boat!

Azimuth, I totally agree with you that its all about the people. And don’t get me wrong I completely understand routine steel repairs especially on boats that age. My point is that those repairs [U]are required[/U] to still hold class, so… statements that the boats are crap is ignorance. The flip side would have been the inspector was never required and the boat operated its lifetime without meeting those standards… thus they would be crap, but that’s not the case. Thats my point.

Now about speed. When you were on board (looking at your dates) was after the props had been repitched for slower survey speeds (a client wanted less then .5 knot) I stood in the wheelhouse of the Davidson while she did 13 knots and was approved for a contract that required that as the top speed, this was back in 2000. Both ship’s hull to speed ratio work out to allow 13 knots speed. On your trip your engineer didn’t have things dialed in right. Issue that you may have had is the ccp controls. If they are not dialed in right you can loose a lot of speed on not getting full pitch with the correct engine rpm.

Anyways, you were on nov-mar 07? Did you do the delivery with the Russians to Nigeria? Heard some funny stories about that trip. Or was that in 08… I cant remember.

Our trip was in the Caribbean, I think the Nigeria thing must have been in 2008.

I did the speed trial for a contract bid in I beleive 03 or 04 on Lake Washington that squeezed out 12.9 and 13.1. Also was capt. on Amelia Earhart search and Nov 06-Apr 07. Hull was crusted w growth(2+years in Gulf for NOAA) and of course mains crusted w improper maintance and care. While on this voyage items enginewise were worked out so that upon arrival in Seattle vessel was more or less in better shape with some hard work and hull cleaning in Costa Rica.
The trip to Nigeria was done by a Polish crew where I am sure there are stories to be told…but I wouldn’t understand it

[quote=c.captain;21628]I did the speed trial for a contract bid in I beleive 03 or 04 on Lake Washington that squeezed out 12.9 and 13.1. Also was capt. on Amelia Earhart search and Nov 06-Apr 07. Hull was crusted w growth(2+years in Gulf for NOAA) and of course mains crusted w improper maintance and care. While on this voyage items enginewise were worked out so that upon arrival in Seattle vessel was more or less in better shape with some hard work and hull cleaning in Costa Rica.
The trip to Nigeria was done by a Polish crew where I am sure there are stories to be told…but I wouldn’t understand it[/quote]

Dave???

[QUOTE=burn626;18880]but I guarantee you based off you comments I know more about these vessels, ABS requirements, ship building and operation then you. [/QUOTE]

Easy there, big fella.
Now, I totally grant that I might not know JDS about the MacArthur, having only heard stuff along the waterfront, but that’s a mighty broad brush you’re using and I’d like to think that I know a wee bit about ABS, ship building and vessel operations. So rein it in buddy, I’m in a fouled prop mood.

I just heard it was sold but no details