Leaving mmp


#1

I recently joined mmp as a licensed 3rd mate. However I decided to go to grad school (which is no where near a hall). I was wondering what is the process for quitting/resigning from the union? I have only paid the 10% induction fee and 2 quarters worth of dues and have only did 1 night mate job. My question is weather I can just stop paying dues and walk away or will they make me pay the rest of the $4500 initiation fee within the 360days from when I started before resigning?


#2

Just stop paying your dues… they will send you a heads up that you are behind or late on dues, then you will be notified that you were dropped from their ranks. You don’t need to resign per se, just… stop paying them their dues.

You’re an applicant… no offense but no one will even notice you’re gone.


#3

Raising threads from the dead?


#4

Need some information. I’ve been at MMP for two years and was recently let go from my job a abrievmant was done I’m looking to change careers completely does one need to fill out paper work to opt out this union


#5

???


#6

abrievmant (obscure nautical term): a very brief period of bereavement following the death of a mate at the hands of a union thug.


#7

Your question was answered in the second post on this thread.

Just don’t pay your dues, no paperwork required.


#8

The union said I have to resign from the union and opt out the voting memebers portion as well


#9

Are you a book member? If not, that is nonsense.

If so, why not just pay dues for a rainy day? As long as no one knows, no one will care.


#10

I’m going to guess he is not in the offshore group and thus may have different rules. Either way, he’s not leaving the CIA. Just move on.


#11

I always thought it kind of comical how meaningless you are to your union…all that rahrah every month from the fat cats in the Union rag about how “crucially important each of our brother and sister mariners are”

Just stop paying your dues, no one will notice or care, you will never hear from the Union again in any real capacity, and they will keep sending you nonsense paperwork and magazines for years. It’s like zombies staff the office. You literally don’t exist to the Union. You are nothing more than a check in the mail. :joy:


#12

#13

If you want to roll over your 401 money or any money purchase benefits somewhere else they are going to require some form of letter stating you are no longer sailing in the Union, amongst other things.


#14

I have seen instructors at the schools still keeping their books. They pointed to the shipping rules stating that academy employment does not force them to resign, so I guess it depends where you go after you stop sailing.


#15

I do not know what the vesting requirements of the MM&P with regards to money purchase benefits but if not vested that money goes back to the union. This doesn’t apply to any employee contributions to a 401.

In the MEBA it was 5 years to be vested in the money purchase plan. With their 401K plan it was 100% employee contributions, at least for the deep sea members.


#16

401k (vested or no) and money purchase are yours (vested, depending on the union) and you are free to roll them over to whomever you like when you leave the union. However this rollover constitutes a disbursement (capital leaving the fund), which the fund managers (and the union) want to avoid as much as possible, so they make the process very difficult. You will be required to submit a letter stating you are leaving the industry never to return (no joke) and go through a lengthy administrative process to get your own money back.

This why I always tell new grads if they don’t think they are going to stick it out not to use the unions 401k but rather set up their own through a financial adviser. Save themselves a lot of time and bs later down the road. But YMMV.


#17

No they aren’t. That’s literally the definition of “vesting”.


#18

Without taking this topic in a different direction, if an employer offers a 401K it would be wise to use that vehicle as a means to grow a retirement nest egg. The contribution limits (19,000 in 2019) are higher than an IRA. If you leave, it is still your money vested or not. Any money put in by an employer is yours only after you are vested. Some places it is immediate, some employers it maybe 3 years, others it is 5 years.


#19

Been there and done that. Part of your compensation through the bargaining agreement. 401k is actually your money that you are setting aside for yourself. Employer match is compensation as per union agreement. When you leave the union it’s yours to take with you.


#20

Then you’re fully vested from the beginning.