Large OSV license - extension of 6,000 ton ITC

The latest text in HR3619 2010-2011 Coast Guard Reauthorization Bill. The Senate passed it’s own version, but it looks as though the text is staying through the reconciliation process by the (Engrossed Amendment Senate - EAS) version.

SEC. 904. OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS.

(a) Removal of Tonnage Limits-
(1) Definition-
(A) Section 2101(19) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking of more than 15 gross tons but less than 500 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of this title, or an alternate tonnage measured under section 14302 of this title as prescribed by the Secretary under section 14104 of this title'. (B) Exemption- Section 5209(b)(1) of the Oceans Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-587; 46 U.S.C. 2101 note) is amended by strikingvessel.’ and inserting vessel of less than 500 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of title 46, United States Code, or an alternate tonnage measured under section 14302 of such title as prescribed by the Secretary under section 14104 of such title.'. (2) Application- Section 3702(b) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking paragraph (1) and redesignating paragraphs (2) and (3) as paragraphs (1) and (2), respectively. (b) Scale of Employment: Able Seamen- Section 7312(d) of title 46, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:(d) Individuals qualified as able seamen–offshore supply vessels under section 7310 of this title may constitute all of the able seamen required on board a vessel of less than 500 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of this title or an alternate tonnage as measured under section 14302 of this title as prescribed by the Secretary under section 14104 of this title engaged in support of exploration, exploitation, or production of offshore mineral or energy resources. Individuals qualified as able seamen–limited under section 7308 of this title may constitute all of the able seamen required on board a vessel of at least 500 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of this title or an alternate tonnage measured under section 14302 of this title as prescribed by the Secretary under section 14104 of this title engaged in support of exploration, exploitation, or production of offshore mineral or energy resources.’.
© Minimum Number of Licensed Individuals- Section 8301(b) of title 46, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:
(b)(1) An offshore supply vessel of less than 500 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of this title or 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of this title on a voyage of less than 600 miles shall have a licensed mate. If the vessel is on a voyage of at least 600 miles, however, the vessel shall have 2 licensed mates.(2) An offshore supply vessel shall have at least one mate. Additional mates on an offshore supply vessel of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of this title shall be prescribed in accordance with hours of service requirements (including recording and record keeping of that service) prescribed by the Secretary.
(3) An offshore supply vessel of more than 200 gross tons as measured under section 14502 of this title, or an alternate tonnage measured under section 14302 of this title as prescribed by the Secretary under section 14104 of this title, may not be operated without a licensed engineer.'. (d) Watches- Section 8104(g) of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by inserting(1)’ after (g)'; and (2) by adding at the end the following:(2) Paragraph (1) applies to an offshore supply vessel of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of this title if the individuals engaged on the vessel are in compliance with hours of service requirements (including recording and record-keeping of that service) as prescribed by the Secretary.’.
(e) Oil Fuel Tank Protection-
(1) Application- An offshore supply vessel of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of this title that is constructed under a contract entered into after the date of enactment of this Act, or that is delivered after August 1, 2010, with an aggregate capacity of 600 cubic meters or more of oil fuel, shall comply with the requirements of Regulation 12A under Annex I to the Protocol of 1978 relating to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, entitled Oil Fuel Tank Protection, regardless of whether such vessel is engaged in the coastwise trade or on an international voyage.
(2) Definition- In this subsection the term `oil fuel’ means any oil used as fuel in connection with the propulsion and auxiliary machinery of the vessel in which such oil is carried.
(f) Regulations-
(1) In general- Not later than January 1, 2012, the Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating shall promulgate regulations to implement the amendments and authorities enacted by this section for offshore supply vessels of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of title 46, United States Code, and to ensure the safe carriage of oil, hazardous substances, and individuals in addition to the crew on such vessels. The final rule issued pursuant to such rulemaking may supersede the interim final rule promulgated under paragraph (2) of this subsection. In promulgating regulations under this subsection, the Secretary shall take into consideration the characteristics of offshore supply vessels, their methods of operation, and their service in support of exploration, exploitation, or production of offshore mineral or energy resources.
(2) Interim final rule authority- As soon as is practicable and without regard to the provisions of chapters 5 and 6 of title 5, United States Code, the Secretary shall issue an interim final rule as a temporary regulation implementing this section (including the amendments made by this section) for offshore supply vessels of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of title 46, United States Code, and to ensure the safe carriage of oil, hazardous substances, and individuals in addition to the crew on such vessels.
(3) Interim period- After the effective date of this Act, prior to the effective date of the regulations prescribed by paragraph (2) of this subsection, and without regard to the provisions of chapters 5 and 6 of title 5, United States Code, and the offshore supply vessel tonnage limits of applicable regulations and policy guidance promulgated prior to the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary may–
(A) issue a certificate of inspection under section 3309 of title 46, United States Code, to an offshore supply vessel of at least 6,000 gross tons as measured under section 14302 of this title if the Secretary determines that such vessel’s arrangements and equipment meet the current Coast Guard requirements for certification as a cargo and miscellaneous vessel; and
(B) authorize a master, mate or engineer who possesses an ocean or near coastal license under part 10 of subchapter B of title 46, Code of Federal Regulations, (or any successor regulation) which qualifies the licensed officer for service on offshore supply vessels of more than 3,000 gross tons, as measured under section 14302 of title 46, United States Code, to operate offshore supply vessels of 6,000 gross tons or greater, as measured under such section.

So, if they’re required to carry mates will they stop using “2nd captains” and “3rd captains”?

[QUOTE=seadog!;39934]So, if they’re required to carry mates will they stop using “2nd captains” and “3rd captains”?[/QUOTE]

You have to have mates now by the COI, so I doubt it. That is something that originated from management with the OSV companies and the fact that some clients actually pay for three licensed Captains. It doesn’t make any sense within the context of the Coast Guard, but it makes perfect sense when it comes to cashing the check. I don’t agree with the terminology, but who am I to question the signature on the paycheck? I’ll call 'em Admirals if they want.

I may be wrong, but from what I saw on a supply boat I worked on that had 3 “Captains” they all had the same crackerjack license but only the ‘1st Captain’ got paid a captains wage. The other two were in all essence mates, but were called captains to smooth over their egos. In fact I work as a steward at the moment (Hey, I’ve got bills to pay!) and I make more than the 3rd Captain on that boat makes.

[QUOTE=HawsePiper;40420]I may be wrong, but from what I saw on a supply boat I worked on that had 3 “Captains” they all had the same crackerjack license but only the ‘1st Captain’ got paid a captains wage. The other two were in all essence mates, but were called captains to smooth over their egos. In fact I work as a steward at the moment (Hey, I’ve got bills to pay!) and I make more than the 3rd Captain on that boat makes.[/QUOTE]

I may be wrong, but I don’t think I’ve ever witnessed someone making a 1st person statement and didn’t know if it was right or not. As far as you know, you might be the engineer.

[QUOTE=anchorman;40421]I may be wrong, but I don’t think I’ve ever witnessed someone making a 1st person statement and didn’t know if it was right or not. As far as you know, you might be the engineer.[/QUOTE]

Now that’s freakin’ funny!

The COIs have called for mates for a long time. Not just OSVs > 3,000, I’ve seen it on crewboats less than 100 GRT ten years ago. The next guy down the totem pole is filling the mates spot whether he has a master or mates license. There is a pay difference between what spot you have with your seniority onboard in unison. Those with mates license are in a different pay scale than those with a masters license. Sometimes the client will request, and pay for, that a person holding a master’s license be on each shift. The ego thing is tied to the paycheck which is tied first to your license, then to your position onboard (2nd Captain, 3rd Captain). Anyone holding a master’s license and is not the Master onboard knows he is essentially the mate whether he has hurt feelings or not. This is nothing new.

[QUOTE=HawsePiper;40420]I may be wrong, but from what I saw on a supply boat I worked on that had 3 “Captains” they all had the same crackerjack license but only the ‘1st Captain’ got paid a captains wage. The other two were in all essence mates, but were called captains to smooth over their egos. In fact I work as a steward at the moment (Hey, I’ve got bills to pay!) and I make more than the 3rd Captain on that boat makes.[/QUOTE]
The guys with a “crackerjack license” are driving the boat, and you are fluffing pillows … nice.

For tHE “CACKERJACK” license they have a new training program

photo below tells it all

[QUOTE=Mr 100-ton;40635]For tHE “CACKERJACK” license they have a new training program

photo below tells it all[/QUOTE]

Reminds me of a porno — your boat is smaller than the real ones on TV.

That first photo was was for the upper management CRACKERJACK LICENSE…

this is the training vessel for the lower license

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