Hydrogen winning the race?

It may be for river going vessels, such as push tugs, dredgers, passenger and cargo ships, and low-profile coasters. But I think Ammonia will win for Ocean going in the end.

What race? There’s NO race.

There was once a totally emissions-free nuclear powered cargo ship … and where are all her descendants now? There was never another one. Defeated by economics … and/or politics.

As I’ve always said, tell me who won your race after your entry has been competetively (subsidy free) running cargo for ten years by simply showing me the costs versus benefits demonstrated in real life, not some fantasist’s thought bubble.

Yes there were:

One is still sailing in commercial service:

OK, but neither of those look like they are dedicated cargo ships. What are their names in English?

The second one looks like an icebreaker with special purpose machinery on deck for construction of some sort and there may well be justification in nuclear powered icebreakers … for the Russians.

Either way, there doesn’t seem to be any take-up of this wonderful, efficient, emissions free and mature technology for propelling cargoes around the world as eco-zealots flit nowadays from sails to methane, blue or green hydrogen, storage battery electric etc. What go past a mature efficient technology?

If it’s sustainability that’s the goal, why not wood chips? That technology passes the eco-zealot tick of approval … somehow.

The second ship is the Sevmorput. It is a nuclear powered LASH (barge carrier). Since its last refit in 2016 it has been mainly chartered by the Russian military.

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Top one is the German ship Otto Hanh:
http://www.radiationworks.com/ships/nsottohahn.htm
The second one the Russian ship Sevmorput, which was built as a LASH carrier, but is now converted to carry containers, reefer and project cargo, mainly to Arctic or Antarctic destinations:
http://www.owlapps.net/owlapps_apps/articles?id=482936&lang=en

Mostly for Russian military and civilian construction project in the Arctic, She also did some trips with frozen fish from Kamchatka to St. Petersburg via the NSR recently.
She broke down on a trip to Antarctica last year:

PS> I don’t believe she is back in running condition yet (??)

UPDATE: She may not be alone for much longer:

Be interested to know the size and training level of the engine departments on these vessels. I know the Savannah and Navy ships’ levels would be impractical when you’re trying to keep to a total crew of 20 or less.