How has Operations changed w/ Covid-19?

Still out at sea? Working shoreside?
Engineer? Captain? Mate? Cook? Tankerman? A/B? In the Management Office?

I’m looking for information about how Fleet Management and Vessel Operations has changed because of Covid.

Has your company started using a new program or technology to help keep operations going? Is there talk about installing/implementing something new?

These could be things like:

-mobile apps for stores/inventory request orders
-procurement
-bunkering
-crewing
----travel arrangements
----digital based training
----e-learning
----VR virtual reality use in training
-Remote surveying
----class inspections
----COI
----audits
----etc.
-Shoreside connectivity
----health check-ins
----access to remote medical professionals
----mental health services
----Connectivity to Family and Friends

These are strange times - is this pandemic accelerating the use of new tech?

Keep at it boys (and ladies). I know it ain’t easy out there on a normal day.

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More paperwork…

Sounds like crap Finn… (thats my surname kin)

But - what kind of paperwork? On what? What are you filling it out on? The same old ships computer email? Filing cabinet?

Contractors are now wanting self declaration of no COVID-19 symptoms on board within the last 14 days. Also additional risk assessments regarding working with contractors and surveyors as well as provisional of additional PPE which in turn includes ‘how to’ procedures.

There is also additional pressure being applied by unions claiming that ‘their members are at risk’.

All this when working from home and under lock down!

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Sounds typical. Paperwork solving all the worlds problems.

What position do you work?

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Technical superintendent -Towage

Operational Changes due to Covid-19 such as; Pre-Covid 19 ; Worked 90 day rotations. Now working 45 day rotations. All the company’s vessels were sailing now only 60% of them are sailing ? Company’s used to require a mirage of pre-go to ship Mariner gotta do’s of a laundry list of items, Now that has been reduced to a quick pick of items ? Those kind of operational changes. Or are the companies attempting to run their companies same old same old with the exception of adding more to the work load of those on board ? Read that due to weak demand for products due to Covid-19, there is less demand to ship products. Due to weaker demand in shipping is there anything being done so what work is available can be equally divided among all the mariners or it is just HOG the work if you got it ?

Maybe not the type of operations you were thinking about, but a lot of things have changed because of Covid-19.
Such as SIRE inspection on tankers, which can now be carried out remotely:

First remote SIRE inspection for Flex LNG vessel:
https://www.rivieramm.com/news-content-hub/news-content-hub/first-remote-sire-inspection-for-flex-lng-vessel-60976#:~:text=The%20inspection%20was%20carried%20out,parties%20concerned%20with%20ship%20safety.

I haven’t seen or heard about OVID or CMID inspections of Offshore vessels and rigs being carried out remotely, but it MAY have happened(??)
PS> I’m no longer accredited Surveyor for either.
Don’t miss it, but if it can be done from the comfort of my office chair, don’t require long travel and climbing around on boats and rigs, maybe I should apply for renewed accreditation.

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Most notably, we have to quarantine before joining with a twice daily temperature log, and several nasal-pharyngial swabs are collected for PCR tests. Depending on where we are from, some of us have to quarantine when we return home, too. We don’t go through immigration any more, in the country where I work, so we can’t leave the airport/heliport when we crew change. At work, they have divided the pre-tour meeting into two groups so that the room isn’t crowded. Medic logs our temperatures before the meeting daily. We wear masks to the meeting. There is no buffet food anymore, and we must physically distance ourselves in the mess. We are supposed to wear masks on the bridge and in the ECR maybe some other places. We are supposed to disinfect surfaces lots of times per shift, but they also down-manned us… so suck an egg on that one. And we have to log our ‘close contacts’ while on board. Since I work with the sewage, that’s everyone. That’s not my favourite kind of close contact. But luckily for me, I guess the virus likes safety meetings, salads, and screens more than shit?

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Similar, here. Nasal swab/quarantine prior to join, then they create a bubble. Masks in common areas, limited numbers in the lounge and mess, gym and laundry. Not well enforced by the way but what can you do. I also handle sewage, sound sewage and GW daily, I use gloves and wash up well afterwards. I am probably safer here than at home. I feel for all the long term holdovers around the world.

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Never mind the human costs: its going to cause an accident. Maybe a lot of accidents. People get tired, even if their mental health remains intact (which doesn’t seem to be widely true). I heard of a car carrier in Port of Vancouver where 3 crew members refused to sail. One of them was the Chief Officer, another was the cook. Their flag state gave them dispensation to sail without those positions!

I think the fatigue and distraction has already led to accidents, like the one near Mauritius. Were they not skirting the reef in order to get a cell signal and call home? Only going to get worse. A horror show in slow motion.

ITF is taking up the problem of accidents because of fatigue, long time onboard without relief, or even shore leave:

Emrobu humor is the best humor!

LMFAO :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: !!!