Academies and Gas Turbine

I know academy kids graduate with motor and steam, how would they go about getting gas turbine as well while working on their license?

At Maine, there was a gas turbines course. Mandatory for at least MEO, possibly MET, not for systems. Successfully complete it and you’d get the gas turbines endorsement on your thirds.

Sorry temporary reading comprehension failure. You can look at NMC under approved courses. Looks like Maresk probably has an in-house, Star center has a 10 day course, and the Calhoon school has one.

At Cal, our turbines course covered both steam and gas turbines. Cal also has a working gas turbine as well so you do get to see it run and learn the thermodynamics behind it.

When I renewed in 2004, I was given a gas turbine endorsement. I thought it was because I had gas turbine time around '80. Come to find out all renewals received gas turbine.

From the MSM.
2. Gas Turbine Vessels.
A motor license and a steam license both qualify the holder to serve on board gas turbine propelled vessels. No specific endorsement is needed. Service obtained aboard gas turbine propelled vessels may be credited as both motor service or steam service, but can not be credited twice. For example, an applicant for a raise of grade from 3 A/E of Steam and Motor Vessels to 2 A/E of Steam and Motor Vessels has 360 days of gas turbine service. The time may be credited as 120 days towards each mode and 120 days towards satisfying the 360 day requirement

[QUOTE=injunear;56284]…From the MSM.
2. Gas Turbine Vessels.
A motor license and a steam license both qualify the holder to serve on board gas turbine propelled vessels. No specific endorsement is needed. Service obtained aboard gas turbine propelled vessels may be credited as both motor service or steam service, but can not be credited twice. For example, an applicant for a raise of grade from 3 A/E of Steam and Motor Vessels to 2 A/E of Steam and Motor Vessels has 360 days of gas turbine service. The time may be credited as 120 days towards each mode and 120 days towards satisfying the 360 day requirement[/QUOTE]

The current policy is in NVIC 2-01. From a 2010 appeal decision considering the validity of the Marine Safety Manual provisions on gas turbine:

[I]While your reading of the MSM is correct, I believe that the portions you have cited are no longer valid as they were superseded and replaced by Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular (NVIC) 2-01, Qualification of Engineer Officers Serving on Seagoing Vessels with Gas Turbine Main Propulsion. Although the NVIC notes “none” under directives affected, the two documents are clearly in conflict and thus the more recent, NVIC 2-01, must be considered the controlling authority when its requirements conflict with those of the earlier MSM.

That the MSM provisions concerning gas turbine vessels are no longer valid and were superseded by NVIC 2-10 are evidenced by several provisions in the MSM that are clearly no longer applicable. In section D of chapter 12 of volume II of the MSM, it states [e]ngineering licenses are issued for service on steam and motor vessels, or both.” NVIC 2-01 provides for the issuance of licenses for gas turbine as a third propulsion mode. [/I]

As for academies, whether or not thery get gas turbine depends on whether the specific academy provides gas turbine training.

[QUOTE=highseasmechanic;56282]At Cal, our turbines course covered both steam and gas turbines. Cal also has a working gas turbine as well so you do get to see it run and learn the thermodynamics behind it.[/QUOTE]
When I was there the little thing was cute. We only ran it a couple times during the power gen class. Our turbines class spent about a week on GT’s
As far as Turbines go, not a whole lot off difference between gas and steam turbines. When I upgraded from 3rds to 2nd they automatically upgraded my GT. I have never sailed on a GT ship. When I got my 1st they didn’t up the GT.

[QUOTE=brjones;56537]As far as Turbines go, not a whole lot off difference between gas and steam turbines.[/QUOTE]

I think the GT would be hard on a condenser. And I never worried about a hung start with a steam turbine. :slight_smile:

Back when I got my license, there was no Gas Turbine endorsement. I did, however, take a Gas Turbine elective that was offered. It was a good course. We even made a trip up to the GE plant in Schenectady where they were building the Frame 5 and 7 industrial turbines. Now, I never sailed on any GT powered vessels, but now I handle some GT related claims for offshore installation. Glad I took the course. There are significant differences between Gas and Steam turbines, condensers aside.

Ok so my statement was misinterpreted. Obviously there are some differences. Guess I should have said same theory. Expansion across blades attached to a rotor. Even in a GT combined plant the condenser is acting the same, only it comes from the steam generated by the waste heat boiler. Which at that point it is a steam plant. Again never sailed a GT ship, but I have worked combined cycle power plants. However I do find it interesting that the CG thinks I am qualified to sail as a 2nd on a GT ship even though I have no sea time on a GT ship.