Women on oil rigs?


#21

Agree, many rigs in the north sea use their automation on the rig floor now, not as many people on the rig floor. Eventually it will be mostly technical people and marine people ( due to class). The 2 toolpushers, driller, driller trainer, 3 ads, and 6-8 roughnecks will be a thing of the past.


#22

[QUOTE=PDCMATE;110938]Agree, many rigs in the north sea use their automation on the rig floor now, not as many people on the rig floor. Eventually it will be mostly technical people and marine people ( due to class). The 2 toolpushers, driller, driller trainer, 3 ads, and 6-8 roughnecks will be a thing of the past.[/QUOTE]

It is just a matter of time and regulatory requirement that this all happens. If I were a young person that wanted a career in the offshore oil industry I would be getting as much technical training as I could because the days of the roustabout that becomes as OIM or drilling superintendent will come to an end soon. Already some companies are insisting that the managers come from maintenance background not necessarily a drilling background. This change is going to happen sooner than most people realize. The “get a bigger hammer” and “git 'er done” types will no longer have a place.


#23

If you do not have $$ for school, then you could get your MMD Card & TWIC (also getting your STCW will open more doors) and look at getting on a SupplyBoat or OSV as a deckhand and work your way up. Some OS positions start at $200.00+/day, With in 2-3 years you could get your Mate License(some Mates are @ $350.00+) then Captain(some Captains $700.00+/day0 Conceivably you could go from green OS to Captain with in 5 years if you get all of your classes and advance as soon as you can.


#24

I’m a RN with teaching experience, disaster preparedness, safety, OSHA, independent practice, and surgical experience. My husband is a Mate, and I’m wondering about a medic position so we could work together. Is that The Impossible Dream? So hard to get work on land to match his schedule.


#25

A guy I went to school with works on a rig as a medic so I’m sure it can be done


#26

Its possible, but your over qualified as an RN to be a medic offshore. Also, they are not fans of husbands and wives working together on the same vessel, so almost certain you would not be on the same rig/vessel.


#27

Chiming in here. I am in the process of getting my certs to go offshore myself probably as a cook or steward or something. I don’t worry how the men will view me or if they will respect me. But then again I’ve been in the work force for a long time and on average I work with more men than other women. People are people and regardless of where you work the biggest mistake I see women make on any job is being too sensitive and feeling ‘picked on’ when in reality they’re being either corrected or instructed. I can say I’ve honestly (in 20+ years in the work force) have never been sexually harassed. That doesn’t mean I’ve never had a man ask me out, of course I have, but when I say no I’ve never been treated badly nor have I ever been paid less or otherwise treated unfairly due to my gender. My current boss and I get along great. He’s going to hate to loose me (most likely because I’ll help him collect bugs to throw on people) but he understands I am trying to do something with my life.
I would assume for the most part it would be the same here as people are people. You get what you give in life. If you want respect, give it. If you want consideration, give it. Everybody has a bad day.


#28

[QUOTE=AmandaOwens;112298]Chiming in here. I am in the process of getting my certs to go offshore myself probably as a cook or steward or something. I don’t worry how the men will view me or if they will respect me. But then again I’ve been in the work force for a long time and on average I work with more men than other women. People are people and regardless of where you work the biggest mistake I see women make on any job is being too sensitive and feeling ‘picked on’ when in reality they’re being either corrected or instructed. I can say I’ve honestly (in 20+ years in the work force) have never been sexually harassed. That doesn’t mean I’ve never had a man ask me out, of course I have, but when I say no I’ve never been treated badly nor have I ever been paid less or otherwise treated unfairly due to my gender. My current boss and I get along great. He’s going to hate to loose me (most likely because I’ll help him collect bugs to throw on people) but he understands I am trying to do something with my life.
I would assume for the most part it would be the same here as people are people. You get what you give in life. If you want respect, give it. If you want consideration, give it. Everybody has a bad day.[/QUOTE]

If your boss finds collecting bugs to throw on people fun and you enjoy it also you have a long prosperous career ahead of you in the offshore business. You already understand the mentality!


#29

How hard is it for a woman to get a job as a radio operator on a oil rig?


#30

I know of a few women in that position off the top of my head. Also know many who are sailing as officers on board not only drill ships but various vessels world wide. If you’ve got the credentials you’re as qualified as anyone and should apply.


#31

Well this reply is a few years too late, I am guessing, but I will reply anyhow for the sake of future females, seeing as I think I’m the only female who has actually replied…

  1. You need some type of cert to get offshore. A good idea is to get an easy cert (like your ABS ticket, or EMT-Basic, so that you can work as a deck hand or a medic). This will get you on a boat and into the environment, where you can suss it out from there and decide what you want to do. There are hundreds of jobs in the industry, just depends on how much you like to get dirty!! Once you get some money rolling in, invest in the cert that you want. Yes, it will cost money. But YES, it will be worth it.
  2. I am oilfield diver, but I was working on a semi-sub that did a well-killing job…since none of us were in the water, we worked as roughnecks with the other trained roughnecks. It’s like working on an assembly line. Pipe goes down, swing in another pipe, screw it on, pipe goes down, repeat 7,000,000 times. It’s goddamn boring. It requires a decent level of physical fitness, but you don’t have to be crazy strong. Yes, you get respect if you work hard and pull your weight. But if you play the female card, wince at rough language, or are overly concerned with your appearance, respect goes out the window. You will have to prove yourself, again and again. But once you have been in the industry a few years, you honest to God forget that you are any different from the guys…and once you get into a supervisory position, you rarely get a second glance…as long as you know your stuff, are respectful to others, and a good leader…male or female.
  3. Ahh the cushy jobs. As a rule of thumb in any industry, the more you sit on your butt, the more you get paid…and the more stress you have. I’ve worked the dirty job (diving) and the cushy job (planner) and I’ll take diving any day. When I am diving, all I have to do is what the supervisor says…put the bolt in the hole…done. As a planner though, holy shit, I am arranging a crew change for 50 people, booking flights, booking hotels, getting visas for oncoming crew, submitting timesheets, booking crew boats, arranging equipment transfers…all simultaneously. Cushy entry-level jobs would be a medic (you would need your EMT-B), planner/clerk (this one can be difficult…the prefer to use people that have already been in the industry, doing other jobs), storeman (a rare job, but it does exist on larger rigs/boats), assistant life support tech (diving industry job with lots of upward mobility), ROV tech (you’ll need a cert for this).
  4. Ahh, if I had to do it all over again!! If you are willing to go back to school, then I’d say go to the maritime school and come out as a ship’s officer. Yes, it will take a while. But it will be worth it. Either that or the assistant life support tech. The school is only 3 weeks, but the upward mobility is great and the pay starts at decent ($200ish a day) and tops out at awesome (after 5 years, about $800 a day). I’d still recommend coming out as something simple, like a deck hand, that way you’ll get a chance to look at other jobs and decide from there.
  5. You’ll get a few second glances when you arrive, but as long as you work hard, people will forget pretty quickly that you are any different than the lads. (you will never forget, however!). There’s always a few ladies men on the rig who will be extra flirty, seeing as you’ll probably be the only person to flirt with. Having fun and joking around is all good, but be careful not to let things go too far, or let guys get the wrong idea. If you start messing around with a guy on the rig, everyone will know within 5 minutes and you will lose some respect. (rumours spread faster than a little old ladies tea party out here!). A few rules I have: never be naked anywhere on the boat, except the shower stall (or your own room, if you are lucky enough to have one…this was prob more difficult for me, as I was a diver, and that involved lots of peeling off wet suits and chamber time and outdoor showers!). Don’t meet anyone in their cabin…surefire way to start rumours. Eye contact can be taken the wrong way, especially with Filipinos and Malays, so I’ve learned to just avoid it all together with those fellas. I also avoid spending too much time with any one person (like constantly being seen talking to, or eating with, just that one person). All this will become second nature to you in time. Sexual harassment does happen, but can vary depending on what you consider sexual harassment. If a dirty joke gets your blood boiling, then this is not the industry for you. I had quite a few things happen to me in the first 2 years (before I started really enacting aforementioned policies). I’ve had guys climbing in my rack (three times!) and been backed into a wall. I dealt with each of these incidences the same way…I did NOT go to any supervisor. I pulled aside the guy, and said firmly (but with a smile and an upbeat attitude) that they were getting a little carried away, and they needed to back off. ("seriously, bro, don’t be doing that again, tsk tsk, seriously). The important thing to remember is to 1-nip it in the bud before it gets out of hand, 2-you still need to maintain a working relationship with that person, because the boat is your family. be polite and have a good attitude, but be firm; 3-the office would probably disagree with me, but I don’t believe in involving a supervisor. The little “talking to” that I’ve had to give several guys has always worked…I’ve never needed to go higher up. Having said all of that, once I got into a supervisory position, all of that stopped. I guess women in supervisory positions, barking orders at the guys with a cig in her mouth, is a lot less sexy than a wide-eyed little lady on the back deck hauling up jet hose. All in all, bad experiences are very few.

I LOVE working offshore and would recommend it to anyone with a decent work ethic, high BS tolerance, and a good sense of humour!!


#32

We’re trying to build more diversity offshore. I’m looking for women who would be interested in roustabout positions offshore. Please contact my email: bronson@primeoceangroup.com