Which of the 6 Academies is more "Hands On"


#1

Which of the 6 academies offers the most hands on teaching approach? more time outside and less time in the classroom focusing on academics? looking at the curriculum it seems that GLMA might be it? I might be wrong though.


#2

I go to maine. I know we have a lot more small vessels to play around on than a suny, and mass. I don’t really know anything about texas a&m, cal and great lakes.

We have an arctic schooner, crew boat, tug, research vessel, and a number of other small vessels motor, and sail in addition to the ship. All of those vessels are used in hands on classes that are part of the deck curriculum.

We also have several bridge simulators, which i believe to be similar to what the other academies have.

That covers the deck side.

Not really sure about engine side, other than the fact that we have several marine diesels, and a small steam boiler in various classroom spaces that are used as part of labs for various classes.


#3

I just graduated from TMA in May. In my four years we only used small boats once and it was a single screw line-handler. We do not have any tugs. There are some sailboats but you have to be on the sail team or in sailing class to use them. It’s not like you can borrow them to cruise around the bay.
Simulators are a big part of the cirriculum. there is a full mission bridge, radar, tanker and GMDSS simulators.
We have a lifeboat davit on campus at the waters edge. That class is hands on but I bet that is the case everywhere.
We currently cannot use our training ship because it does not have a COI.
They are working on getting a new one or getting that one converted but they said that the whole time I was there and nothing ever happened. I never sailed on her except for when they filmed an episode of prison break on it and it was towed into the middle of the channel so they could get their shot.
As a result of TMA not having a useable training ship I went on 2 training cruises with Cal maritime. From my experience they were more hands on with the marlinespike seamanship. but everything else was equally as hands on between the two. Whenever we would be coming in and out of port they had licensed officers that would supervise everything. Each pre-brief included them telling the Cadet PIC that it was their show and the mates were only there to supervise for safety however once things got going the mates took over pretty quickly.

I found that I got the most hands on experience on my commercial cruise. I was on a tanker and they worked my ass off but I think i learned half of everything I know on that ship.

You would have to ask an engineer from TMA to get the whole story but to me it seemed like they were very hands on


#4

[quote=cttief;13050]I just graduated from TMA in May. In my four years we only used small boats once and it was a single screw line-handler. We do not have any tugs. There are some sailboats but you have to be on the sail team or in sailing class to use them. It’s not like you can borrow them to cruise around the bay.
Simulators are a big part of the cirriculum. there is a full mission bridge, radar, tanker and GMDSS simulators.
We have a lifeboat davit on campus at the waters edge. That class is hands on but I bet that is the case everywhere.
We currently cannot use our training ship because it does not have a COI.
They are working on getting a new one or getting that one converted but they said that the whole time I was there and nothing ever happened. I never sailed on her except for when they filmed an episode of prison break on it and it was towed into the middle of the channel so they could get their shot.
As a result of TMA not having a useable training ship I went on 2 training cruises with Cal maritime. From my experience they were more hands on with the marlinespike seamanship. but everything else was equally as hands on between the two. Whenever we would be coming in and out of port they had licensed officers that would supervise everything. Each pre-brief included them telling the Cadet PIC that it was their show and the mates were only there to supervise for safety however once things got going the mates took over pretty quickly.

I found that I got the most hands on experience on my commercial cruise. I was on a tanker and they worked my ass off but I think i learned half of everything I know on that ship.

You would have to ask an engineer from TMA to get the whole story but to me it seemed like they were very hands on[/quote]

How’s the jobs right after school?


#5

I’ve been looking for a job but its kinda hard to do without your license in hand. I’ve passed all the exams and met all of the other requirements to be a Third mate however since everything is going to the NMC i’ve been told, and seen from my friends who graduated last december that it will take about 4-6 weeks to get my license mailed. any company that is looking to hire is gonna want to know your license number which you wont know till you get it and they usually need someone right then and that job is gonna pass you by. I was looking for a job today and one company had this message on their career opportunities website
"Due to the current economic downturn and the reduction in petroleum movement, we are not currently accepting applications for seagoing jobs. Please check back with us from time to time as we will resume hiring when conditions permit."
so things aren’t looking to good right now but its still a good industry I’ll jsut have to wait for things to get better


#6

How’s the potential pay right out of the academy?


#7

Leeky- I’ve read your posts-

have you considered PMI/Mitags? www.workboatacademy.com

Hands on training- much less expensive than the other schools,only takes 2 years, and you make money while working. They also accept GED.

I’ve worked with one of their cadets- you definitely work- and have training on the side- as well as when you’re back on land.

But-Your 3m license isn’t unlimited/oceans…

Regarding pay-

Depends on the job, your rotation, type of vessel, etc.

Low end- my 3M on the Empress got $240 a day- she was a recent Cal Maritime Grad.

High end- if you have DP training or go the MSC route you can break $100k out of the gate.

That said- it’s competitive right now… lots of experienced people without work- and lots of people from other industries who are out of work/looking for a start.


#8

Depends on your definition.

If by “Hands On” you mean spending hours each day of cruise behind a chipping hammer then SUNY Maritime wins hands down.

If by “Hands On” you mean working without getting your white coveralls stained then it’s King’s Point.

If by “Hands On” you mean having your hands frozen to the tools, then it’s Maine Maritime.

All joking aside, maybe it’s because it has the oldest ship but SUNY seems the most hands on of the schools, in my opinion, but there is a major draw-back… no cadet cruises. Otherwise the colleges (except KP) are about the same. If your not worried about getting a degree then I also highly recommend The Workboat Academy for getting hands on experience.


#9

[SIZE=5][B]Thank you for all your replies and suggestions, your advices are really making my journey into a captain one day much easier :).

[/B][/SIZE]


#10

Maine prides itself in being hands on and for the most part it was when I was there, 1998-2002. You need to go to which ever campus you narrow it down to and take a look around… That said, in my experience at Maine, if you are in the unlimited program you will not be using all the assorted water craft down at the Waterfront much. In four years there, I only handled the tug and a launch. When you visit they go on and on about how welcome students are to use the boats, from my experience it was all BS. We tried on multiple occasions to use a sailboat or Boston Whaler and there was always a reason why we couldn’t. Maine is a great school, but don’t go expecting to be able to use all the water craft up there.


#11

[quote=Ordinaryseaman;13066]Leeky- I’ve read your posts-

have you considered PMI/Mitags? www.workboatacademy.com

Hands on training- much less expensive than the other schools,only takes 2 years, and you make money while working. They also accept GED.

I’ve worked with one of their cadets- you definitely work- and have training on the side- as well as when you’re back on land.

But-Your 3m license isn’t unlimited/oceans…

Regarding pay-

Depends on the job, your rotation, type of vessel, etc.

Low end- my 3M on the Empress got $240 a day- she was a recent Cal Maritime Grad.

High end- if you have DP training or go the MSC route you can break $100k out of the gate.

That said- it’s competitive right now… lots of experienced people without work- and lots of people from other industries who are out of work/looking for a start.[/quote]

I called PMI in Seattle asked a few questions, basically the program is $28,000 for two years, you get paid a stipend anywhere from $600-$800 a month while you work on tugboats with companies that are affiliated with the institute, The student is responsible for his own lodging and there’s no financial aid and no partnership with career loan programs. those 2 years will probably be real tough in a city like Seattle on $600.00 a month.


#12

Find a girlfriend…I did! Just kidding, she found me. Lodging is a challenge but you certainly aren’t going to be IN Seattle for 2 years. I lived aboard a historic tug in trade for labor for a while. Remember that one full year is at sea and you will do better than the stipend if you sail for any of the companies that have been involved for the last two and half years.

I don’t know what has become of the tuition re-imbursement plan, though people that sailed with Dunlap, Sause and K-Sea are getting theirs paid back. K-Sea is starting 2nd’s at over 450 a day and more with TPIC…As for being hands on it’s hard to beat OJT. I operated 5600 & 7200 HP conventional tugs and a 10,000HP Voith tug, stood the watches and worked on deck & in the engine room.

The benefit of sailing for a big company was opportunities to be involved in widely varied projects all over the world - the down side was that it’s a big company and they loose track of things like cadets!

Though with the current economy I know that the school is having a hard time finding billets. Too bad some companies are fixated on the the “union affiliation”, this program offers them a motivated hand on the cheap, that they can train any way they care too…oh, well. I certainly don’t want to work for a union - especially after the MM& P just up their retirement to 62 from 20 years of service…
MTSKIER


#13

Couple of ideas regarding PMI-

1- the cadet I sailed with on the Empress made $120 a day ($3600 a month) and told me several of his PMI friends made more.

2-Housing- he got free housing by working the desk at a hostel in Seattle when ashore. I’ve traded work for housing at the Green Tortoise Hostel by Pikes Place Market as well as at hostels in Hawaii, Texas, and Louisiana.

3- I’m told there is a certain amount of “flexibility” with regards to pricing- especially if you have cash.

I’m thinking of going (maybe after this hitch)- if I can skip BST and a few things I already have…

Anthony


#14

[quote=Ordinaryseaman;13095]Couple of ideas regarding PMI-

[B]1- the cadet I sailed with on the Empress made $120 a day ($3600 a month) and told me several of his PMI friends made more.
[/B]
2-Housing- he got free housing by working the desk at a hostel in Seattle when ashore. I’ve traded work for housing at the Green Tortoise Hostel by Pikes Place Market as well as at hostels in Hawaii, Texas, and Louisiana.

3- I’m told there is a certain amount of “flexibility” with regards to pricing- especially if you have cash.

I’m thinking of going (maybe after this hitch)- if I can skip BST and a few things I already have…

Anthony[/quote]

That’s more like it! i wonder why they said $600 a month.


#15

“That’s more like it! i wonder why they said $600 a month”

Because that’s the cadet pay (I heard $800)

My friend (the PMI cadet) told me he was worried about that too- and was happy he was getting $120 a day. While he told me he knew of some getting more- I was left with the impression that most got standard cadet pay.

Have you spoken to Victor Tufts at Mitags in Maryland yet?

It’s PMI’s sister school-

www.mitags.org

They have a class starting up in a few months. Victor is polite, informative and can be reached at-

(443) 989-3531 or via e-mail at workboatmate@mitags.org.


#16

LEEKYLEEK.

I attended GLMA and I can say it is definitely going to put you way ahead of any other maritime academy graduate. You do all your sea time on merchant vessels, which is where you really learn your job. I graduated in 94’ when it was only a 3 year program. But now it is 4 but you graduate with a BA and if you go deck, you recieve a Third Mate unlimited Oceans instead of the Near Coastal, like I got. Because they have arranged sea time on tankers offshore. I tried to do it way back when, but they wouldn’t allow me to. The main reason most attend is to get the First Class Pilotage unlimited for Great Lakes and a job on a Lake Vessel. But if offshore is of interest you have the option. Also there is no head shaving, or any of that drill sargent bull$#!@ they do at the other academies for “discipline”. The majority of Cadets are adults, many being prior service, like I was, and the average age is like 27. So do look into it. I would highly recommend it if you want to persue this type of education and career.
Sincerely, Rob