Very sad breaking news out of Baltimore…..yet another allision. M.V. “Dali”

Report is all 22 on board are safe.

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If someone has access to radio traffic, that will be fascinating. Ships crew apparently notified authorities of power loss before allison. Also, video shows substantial vehicle traffic on the bridge, until a short time before the allision, almost as if traffic was halted…or, its just a miraculous coincidence.

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They’re saying they were able to shut traffic down in the press conference just now.

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Blackout=loss of propulsion. No power for the main lube oil pumps will do it immediately but loss of the fuel supply pump(s), auxiliary blowers, HT pumps, LT pumps, and SW pumps would shut you down in short order also.

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The governor was also saying the boat was coming in, so who knows what they really know.

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this is the best take I have read on a probable cause - think the full astern and anchor down are just what you do when you about to hit something.

The tugs leave with the docking pilot, who leaves shortly after they get off the dock and pointed down river. Then the river pilots take it out the rest of the way.

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i came here to get the news as the main media do not know what questions to even ask.
I’m guessing the switch gear is not gm or rockwell??
I like to assume we’ll have a mariner on here in short order who knows something about the engineering systems on there.
it’s painful to look at the non-mariner types guessing what happened.
oh, and don’t forget the conspiracy theories !!

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I will say that I am not so familiar with large slowspeed propulsion engines and if they auto shutdown if supply pressures drop or if they don’t have engine driven pumps to keep fuel, lube and jacket water circulating like a smaller diesel would however the video shows a ship going black then the lights soon afterwards burning again which says an electrical failure and then smoke rapidly pouring out of the stack just before impact so I suppose it is possible they did lose propulsion for a short time but somehow managed to get the main back up very rapidly? Since this is a direct drive ship would forward motion keep the engine turning over so once electrical power came online that the engine would restart as soon as the injectors began supplying fuel again to the cylinders?

I need to add that as much as this appears to be the Sunshine Skyway bridge again how close we came to this also occurring back in 2007 when the COSTCO BUSAN sideswiped that tower abutment of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco.

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someone will come along more familiar with this class. That smoke was max power astern, and no, there are no auto shut downs on main propulsion … designers and probably the uscg want the last amp available to turn that shaft. Emergency generator supplies vital systems but not a bow thruster and such, besides, the ship weighs 95,000 tons or such … it was screwed when the shaft stopped.

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Very sad day for all involved.

One question I have (and this is without having been into Baltimore since 2006), is with regards to the bridge fendering (or lack thereof).

Looking on GoogleMaps, there doesn’t appear to be any sort of caissons or supplemental fendering system between the main channel and the bridge towers, similar to what is seen around many other bridges, including in the US. If so, it baffles me that a bridge located in that part of the main channel of a major port was never retrofitted.

I thought that lesson was learned after the Summit Venture / Sunshine Skyway allision. Obviously the first burden is on the ship to not lose power/control (whether by mechanical failure or human error), but a little redundancy on all sides helps save lives and property.

The Oakland-Bay bridge is another example. It’s only by pure luck that the Cosco Busan didn’t take that one down either.

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Just watched the video again and see the ship going black at the 4sec mark, then quickly begin swinging right. At 14sec the lights come back on and at the same moment smoke begin pouring out of the stack indicating commencing going emergency astern.

Can engineer’s here say that can a large slowspeed diesel’s cam be shifted on a blacked out ship? If I remember correctly, air is used to shift the cam just before the engine is restarted.

They do

They don’t*

Yeah, 72 seconds assuming the timeline posted above is accurate.

Based on recently built ships I’ve been on, all the vital equipment, beginning with the standby generator and including all the required pumps will sequentially start automatically with no operator action required. Once all those were running and the required pressures were achieved, the operator would have to manually acknowledge all the shutdowns/slowdowns active on the main engine control panel, then the engine could be operated.

*=Exception being the HPS pumps on an MAN ME engine, some of which are engine driven.

I think the dust explosion you see right before the bridge falls is the caisson exploding when it gets hit by the ship. They’re built to some standard, but that was probably a while ago and the ships have gotten bigger since then.

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For a ship built in 2015, I’d be confident in saying it doesn’t have a cam

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I really am old school…if there is no cam to shift, how are these engines put astern?

This is a better video showing the sequence of events

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Wish it was slowed down in real time.

Yeah I see now on other images that there is one caisson on each side of each tower. They don’t show up on google maps for whatever reason.

I know they’re not miracle devices, especially with how large/heavy ships have become, but it still seems like an inadequate design. After all, we’re not talking about some podunk bridge over a barely traversed channel. That caisson may as well have not been there for all the good it did. This is the classic scenario such a system should be designed to withstand - a large ship, at a reasonable maneuvering speed, losing power on approach and “almost” stopping.

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