Ulstein delivers latest Island Offshore subsea vessel

so who can tell me how many American mariners on her?

Ulstein delivers latest Island Offshore subsea vessel

JULY 8, 2014 — Norway’s Ulstein Verft has delivered the 130 m SX 121 design subsea newbuild Island Performer to Island Offshore. The flexible, state-of-the-art RLWI/IMR vessel will serve her first five years working for FTO in the Gulf of Mexico. FTO is a joint venture between FMC Technologies, Edison Chouest Offshore and Island Offshore.

“The vessel is customized to suit the scope of work in the FTO contract, in which RLWI (Riser-less Light Well Intervention) and IMR (Inspection/Maintenance/Repair) are the main tasks,” says Island Offshore Managing Director Håvard Ulstein. “She is able to perform operations at depths down to 3,000 m, and the contracted work starts at year’s end.”

Before starting work for FTO in the Gulf, the ship’s first assignment will be for the RogFast connection in Norway, in which the scope of work will be to investigate the sea bottom."

“A large intervention tower is placed over the 8 m by 8 m main moon pool. She is equipped with a 250-tonne AHC (active heave compensated) offshore crane with a below-deck winch, and carries two deep-sea work ROVs, one to be launched through a dedicated moon pool and the other from the starboard side,” explains Håvard Ulstein.

SMARTER
Island Performer is Ulstein’s next generation subsea vessel, with large accommodation, storage and lifting capacities. She meets the highest standards for station keeping, redundancy and dynamic positioning (DNV GL class notation DYNPOS AUTRO, equivalent to DP3). Additionally, operability in DYNPOS AUTR (DP2) operational mode is maximized due to the ‘Operation+’ feature with a three-split configuration on main machinery. This set-up allows the vessel to retain system integrity and to continue operations uninterruptedly even after a substantial single system failure.

SAFER
A shelter deck extends all the way past the main moon pool and aft to the main crane. This increases the operational window for moon pool work and offers a shielded space for equipment. Arranged on the shelter deck is a multi-skidding system for handling 100-tonne skidding pallets. The design also includes a heavy-load cargo deck for transporting equipment for a multitude of operations and construction work.

Island Performer has been developed and built according to the latest international regulations in which safety and comfort are two key issues.

The vessel is equipped with resiliently mounted tunnel thrusters, and she carries the DNV GL class notation Comfort Class, COMF-V1, which ensures that noise and vibrations are kept at minimum.

SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) catalysts are installed for all engines. An ESD system (Emergency Shut Down system) is installed in order to automatically close down systems in case of a hydrocarbon leakage.

Island Performer has a crew capacity of 130, and in case of evacuation, each of the lifeboats on the starboard and port sides can accommodate everyone on board.

Built with the patented Ulstein X-Bow, the vessel has reduced speed loss in head seas, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and emissions to air.

“Island Offshore has previous experience with this design,” says Håvard Ulstein. “The two SX121 designed vessels already in our fleet have proved to be very successful to us. We are certain that the Island Performer will achieve good results in complex deep water operations in the Gulf of Mexico.”

Ulstein GrouCEO Gunvor Ulstein says: “The three contracting companies combined have extensive competence in the advanced subsea segment. Together, we have developed a solution which is particularly adapted to both RLWI and IMR work, and we strongly believe that the Island Performer will prove her value in the years to come.”

SX121 DESIGN
Length over all approx. 130.0 m
Breadth molded 25.0 m
Deadweight w/tower mounted 7.300 tonnes
Trial speed 15.25 knots
Accommodations 130 persons
Deck skidding system located on shelter deck 100 tonnes unrestricted load
Main moon pool 8.0 m x 8.0 m
ROV moon pool 4.9 m x 4.9 m
300 t SWL Module Handling/Intervention Tower
250 t Offshore Pedestal Crane (AHC) w/ main winch below deck
Dynamic Positioning System DNV AUTRO (IMO Class III / DP3)
Integrated bridge system
Electric equipment, Ulstein delivery: Switchboards, ULSTEIN COM® communication system
ULSTEIN X-BOW® hull line design

I dont think they need any 2nd or 3rd Captains on this one

:cool:

[QUOTE=Kraken;140669]I dont think they need any 2nd or 3rd Captains on this one
:cool:[/QUOTE]

I think there are some bayou admirals on board, but they are not allowed out of the galley…

Why can’t Americans take some pride in their work and build a vessel like this? Another Jones Act waiver to be signed because we don’t have the vessels to do the job.

[QUOTE=KrustySalt;140680]Why can’t Americans take some pride in their work and build a vessel like this?[/QUOTE]

If you look at the shipyards building offshore vessels in the US, it would be like asking someone to construct a sphere after a long career of building only cubes…

[QUOTE=c.captain;140665]so who can tell me how many American mariners on her?[/QUOTE]
At least one is…and you claim that you know him in meatspace.

Have a day.

[QUOTE=Bilgeman;140686]At least one is…and you claim that you know him in meatspace.

Have a day.[/QUOTE]

Yes…you certainly appear to still be the smallest person here…

good day to you

[QUOTE=Bilgeman;140686]At least one is…and you claim that you know him in meatspace.

Have a day.[/QUOTE]

What are you trying to say? Do you mean that Chief Carl, formerly of the Aiviq, is now on this vessel?

I was aboard that vessel last month, here are my photos: http://gcaptain.com/island-performer-ulstein-verft-images/

[QUOTE=tugsailor;140700]What are you trying to say? Do you mean that Chief Carl, formerly of the Aiviq, is now on this vessel?[/QUOTE]

:slight_smile: :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

Kulluk grounding preliminary report was issued 1st week of April…it’s now the second week of July. TMK, no Coast Guard disciplinary charges filed against anyone’s license, however USCG Sector 17 has a new commander:

…with Admiral Ostebo now slated to conn a desk in DC.

Funny how stuff turns out, huh?

Those that speak the most seem to know the least.

Here we go again…

[QUOTE=Kingrobby;140718]Here we go again…[/QUOTE]

not me…I ain’t climbing into a septic tank to have a shit fight with “the bilge” again. I have learned to not enter into arguments with idiots and cretins. Call it a late life lesson for me.

let them blather…I stand above all the bozos and poltroons…

.

[QUOTE=KrustySalt;140680]Why can’t Americans take some pride in their work and build a vessel like this? Another Jones Act waiver to be signed because we don’t have the vessels to do the job.[/QUOTE]

Because Chouest is the only one who could afford to build this boat and/or have the stronghold on one of the majors to get a contract on it. Hence, why North American will be building one of these in near future if they haven’t started already.

Another thing that always blows my mind is the US boat owners seem to have blinders on and only look at 2 things when building a boat: deck space and liquid capacities. And this is why they still build boats with the crappiest logic in the history of liquid transportation: a square tank. I guess they’re not smart enough to realize that you’re not going to pump more than 85-90% of mud out of a square tank but you could pump 95+ percent out of a round tank. And have the tanks cleaned in less than 1/4 of the time! But the oil companies are to blame as well because they are wanting quantities, quantities, quantities out of the boats. Jackson Offshore is one of the few boat owners I know of that are building round mud tanks on every OSV. Have you seen how long it takes to clean these 300’ boats these days with square tanks? Its taking 5-7 days when it could take 1-2 if they were using round tanks and the cleanings aren’t cheap either because its a labor intensive business.

Only in the GOM would someone take the hull shape of a barge and turn it into a boat meant for “rough” conditions.

[QUOTE=c.captain;140665]so who can tell me how many American mariners on her?[/QUOTE]

I would think non. If you take the vessel you take the crew. The Jones act is already broken as the vessel is foreign build.

Lots of ECO Americans on the Island boats.

I know one or two just off hand