The Future Mariner

At the moment I am currently taking basic DP and have to say it has truly opened up my mind to the future of the maritime industry.

[B]Question to the Forum:[/B]
Which scenario seems most likely in 50 years?
[ol]
[li]Deck officers continue to execute voyage plans like we do today by referencing the navigation equipment, communicating our intentions, and using sound judgment[/li][li]Deck officers main role is to take the vessel into manual if the computer crashes along an automated voyage[/li][li]Deck officers are no longer needed because the vessel is completely automated and run like a drone with an active engineering department[/li][/ol]

Keep in mind that over 75% of accidents are human error and the wreck removal of the Costa Concordia is expected to reach over $2 billion dollars.

this is ridiculous…deck officers will still be aboard but the job will be as different as it was when old breakbulk steamships went away which were proceeded by the windjammers…

the profession evolves with technology but people are still needed to operate the vessels

I don’t think deck officers will ever become obsolete and disappear from the bridge, but I’m quite sure various computer systems will become more important in decision-making, situational awareness and route planning in the future in order to reduce the number of accidents caused by human error. There will also be more automatic logging and reporting that cannot be affected by the crew. So, no more shortcuts over the reef…

Agreed. Even when Skynet becomes self aware- pulses will still be necessary. Perhaps just scaled down # a bit.

Someone will still have to throw the heaving lines.

We all know the thing won’t be able to move without 4 mates staring out the window.

Who cares? 50 years from now I am hoping to be dead.

Here is one website I found that is devoted to this concept.

http://www.unmanned-ship.org/munin/

So yes there is some R&D going on to eliminate more jobs though I’m not too worried. Things will change; however, there is always going to be a need for someone on the bridge for when things go wrong. In today’s world companies from radio, tv, telecom, to power plant operators keep personnel at the switches to account for those rare albeit critical moments when the proverbial hits the fan, even though automation can handle 99% of the job. I think shipping will become more like that with less of a need to switch off the auto pilot as the years go by.

Computers don’t think – they compute. There are a lot of impediments to unmanned shipping becoming more than a novelty, and I don’t think they’re going to be overcome in the next fifty years. Shipowners may like the idea of cost savings, but they also want their multi-million dollar investments to be operated by people who can think. Shippers like lower rates, but I expect many will balk at having their cargo carried without mates to ensure correct loading, maintenance, and carriage. National and port authorities are unlikely to allow silent, empty wheelhouses in their waters. Unions will definitely put up severe resistance. Any one of these can cripple the concept from the very start, but all of them together equal an insurmountable obstacle. At least until Otto Pilot can carry on a conversation about cargo handling, navigation procedures, weather, and emergency response.

You always need a scapegoat. You can’t send a computer to jail.

Though automation is increasing rapidly the well trained, qualified people to maintain the equipment is not increasing, especially in the USA. There is a major shortage of well qualified people with the training to maintain this complex electronic equipment.There is a shortage of technical training schools in the USA to prepare people for this sort of work.The maritime schools certainly do not provide them, they are stuck in a time warp from years past.The best qualified people for such work now come from outside the USA.

Like the Coonass version bdrx 3000

The best IMHO. It has a built in pocket pussy and database of porn all on a touch screen interface. I love all those bells and whistles.

You mean we’re going to have to be certified in closing all windows and restarting the system?[QUOTE=tengineer1;141619]Though automation is increasing rapidly the well trained, qualified people to maintain the equipment is not increasing, especially in the USA. There is a major shortage of well qualified people with the training to maintain this complex electronic equipment.There is a shortage of technical training schools in the USA to prepare people for this sort of work.The maritime schools certainly do not provide them, they are stuck in a time warp from years past.The best qualified people for such work now come from outside the USA.[/QUOTE]

[li]Deck officers are no longer needed because the vessel is completely automated and run like a drone with an active engineering department [/li]
I hope this is the future so my kids won’t have to go through all this shit like I did.

Aircraft only have pilots to make the punters feel warm and fuzzy these days as most crashes are now
"Loss of control of the aircraft"
Euphemism for the pilot crashed a perfectly good aircraft as they are really no longer taught how to fly so when thats needed they cant…
Same like when the dp stops.lol

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Large magnets along the dock would do away with line handlers rope and winches…

Technology marches on and reduces the need for so many hands at the tiller, so to speak. Add to that the fact that we are nothing but overhead and liability to the front office and they will try anything and everything to reduce crew size. There is a European company which is trying to get approval for slow moving container ships that run from Europe to South America with only about three people aboard. Every is automated. A full crew is aboard to get it out into the ocean, then flown home and into the ports and that’s it. Read some Kurt Vonnegut. It’ll really make your day. I’m glad I only have about ten useful working years left. Then I’ll retire to Kansas or Nebraska. Somewhere as far away from salt water as I can find.

Funny I didn’t know they could automate rust…

Large magnets along the dock would do away with line handlers rope and winches…

And fry all the onboard electronics in the process!

Eric

just read a couple of recent articles on drone vessels. I know they’ve already tried 2-3 times to sail a real ship across the Pacific. They took off almost all the crew as soon as they passed the sea buoy. Thank goodness they had problems that they couldn’t solve with just the captain and CE or we’d already all be out of work. Yes, they will find some way to get rid of us all. Even if that means just have one guy in the office wired up to the computers actually driving the ship.
Not so sure if they’ll be able to replace all the engineering dept, they might not be able to operate everything down below with robots (yet). I guess the engine crew is safe until they can design more physically flexible robots and ‘failsafe’ automation.