Seattle Maritime Academy

Greetings all,

I am looking for some insight. Recent knowledge and pros and cons for this school program? Job outlook for grads from Seattle? Acceptance in the mariner community? Cost benefit analysis, vs hawespipe route(nearly impossible to get initially hired with OS right now) vs academy route. Also time analysis. I can do academy, but I am 43. I am extremely fit and youthful. I have a BS in Business and have near acceptance at SUNY Maritime Grad prog. Could get into others but I want to start training asap. 2.5 yrs to complete SUNY or Maine but would have to start next year. I am accepted as Seattle Maritime and can start end of september. One year program grad w/ seatime, internship, well here’s their whole spiel for program outcome (I have looked in Piney Point but at Maine Maritime friend and Master said there is much corruption and favoritism there, no offense) link; http://seattlecentral.edu/programs/marinedeck.php

Here it is. THanks to all who reply!!

Seattle Maritime Academy is offering the Marine Deck Technology curriculum as a 61-64-credit program. Students successfully completing this rigorous program will be awarded a certificate in Marine Deck Technology from Seattle Central Community College. Each graduate who successfully completes the program receives eight months of sea service credit towards a license as Master of Inland Steam or Motor Vessels of Not More Than 100 Gross Tons, or eight months of sea service credit towards a license as Mate of Near Coastal Steam or Motor Vessels of Not More Than 200 Gross Tons. This sea service credit is 2/3 of the total required sea service for these licenses. By completing this program, the student also receives 8 months sea service credit towards an Able Seaman-Special endorsement or one-third of the required sea service credit for any other Able Seaman endorsement. Graduates satisfy both the written and practical examination requirements for both the Able Seaman and the Lifeboatman endorsements. Students will receive the Lifeboatman endorsement at graduation. The Marine Deck Technology Certificate Program also qualifies each graduate for an STCW “ratings forming part of a navigational watch” endorsement.
Students receive 6 months sea service credit towards a license as Apprentice Mate (Steersman) of Near Coastal Uninspected Towing Vessels. By interning for 90 days instead of 30 days, students without previous sea service will have enough sea time for AB-Special at graduation

If I may tag along with this question, I have been looking at the Engineering side program at Seattle Maritime, and would love to hear people’s opinions of it.

Its around a year long program, full time (plus some sea time), and you graduate with a QMED with Electrician, Oiler, Pumpman, Refrigerating Engineer, and Junior Engineer ratings.

Sweet. Hope this addition doesn’t co-opt the thread from the original poster.

Thanks.

Sf deckhand,

U thinking of attending this fall. Program starts Sept 29th.

Keep in touch! Give me a shout

I’m sure the training is just fine, but I think it is a lot of money to spend to just get an AB and a 100 ton license.
You can get a job (even in this economy) as an entry level deckhand on any little passenger vessel (Cruise West, Lindblad, American Safari, American Canadian Cruiseline, not to mention all the day only operators), get your sea time and then go to short “in-lieu-of-exam” courses to get a 100 ton and AB. You’d get paid while sailing (albeit not much) and ultimately spend a lot less money.
My advice:
Go take BST, then get on with one of the aforementioned companies. When you have the right amount of seatime, go take an AB in lieu of exam (you can get an AB special or limited) and sail on that for a bit. Then, when you have the right amount of seatime, take a 100 ton in lieu of exam course and sail on that for a bit. Then, if you want to move up to 500 ton Mate (which you can on all those little 99 ton passenger ships, you’ve got a lot of money saved up for all the OICNW courses you need to take.

[QUOTE=Sf_deckhand;16596]If I may tag along with this question, I have been looking at the Engineering side program at Seattle Maritime, and would love to hear people’s opinions of it.

Its around a year long program, full time (plus some sea time), and you graduate with a QMED with Electrician, Oiler, Pumpman, Refrigerating Engineer, and Junior Engineer ratings.

Sweet. Hope this addition doesn’t co-opt the thread from the original poster.

Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Engineering is a whole 'nother matter, thought. I’ve heard nothing but great things about this program (I’ve sailed with several of SMA’s engineering graduates), and there is a genuine shortage of engineers right now. So, that is money very well spent.

Capt Fran,

Thanks for the advice! As far as the job hunting. I have taken BST at Maine Maritime. Have TWIC, Passport etc, Every company you listed, (and many more) I have applied to and not even an email, letter or call acknowledging receipt of the application/resume. I have quite a few skills that cross over to thier businesses as well.

I am sure it is a questionn of getting the first job. Much like the brewing business that I entered years ago, after the first job the rest came a little easier. Of course, I do not live near where the jobs are at. You would think that on the coast of Maine there would be more seagoing jobs of any sort, but that is not the case.

You say pass on the deck program but do take the engineering route. I certainly have the skills and could do either.

I have great references and anyplace I have ever worked I move up fast, and no employer has ever wanted to see me go. (maybe a few should’ve treated me better! lol)

Any job leads??

THanks again!

Cheers

Any job leads?

As an unlimited chief engineer and former engineering instructor at SMA I can attest to the quality of training and benefits the school offers. It’s an excellent starting point for someone seeking a career in the workboat industry or as an unlicensed mariner in the deepsea fleet.

If you already have a degree you may find the SUNY* route a much more satisfying experience. While 2-1/2 years might sound like a long time it will pass very quickly, and if you choose engineering, you will enter the industry with qualifications and certifications that offer you more than seagoing opportunities. Under the new licensing scheme you will advance quickly from 3rd A/E and build a resume that is valuable across the entire maritime and associated industries.

If you try and crawl through the hawsepipe you will certainly spend several years beyond 2-1/2 just trying to catch up and you will spend a moderate sized fortune buying the training you need to obtain a license. You might find the experience frustrating and discouraging at this point in your life with your experience and education.

  • My advice would be to talk to the folks at Cal Maritime and see what you can do there. I don’t wish to stir up a hornet’s nest but I would stay away from the northeastern schools (except Kings Point of course)

Aww c’mon our northeastern schools are the best!

Just so you know, I don’t believe that there is a Master’s engineering program at SUNY just yet. I know they are trying to create one, but for now, the only grad-license program there is with a deck license. And I believe they shortened the grad program to 2 years and you’re done in the summer.

What sort of degree do you hold? If it is one a few specific types (electrical, mechanical) from an accredited university you may be able to write a 3rd Assistant Engineer’s license with just 6 months of sea time as a wiper. This is a not-often used rule in the CFRs (Title 46, Chapter I)

Sec. 10.516 Service requirements for third assistant engineer of
steam and/or motor vessels.

(a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for license 

as third assistant engineer of steam and/or motor vessels is:
(1) Three years of service in the engineroom of vessels, two years
of which must have been as a qualified member of the engine department;
(2) Three years of service as an apprentice to the machinist trade
engaged in the construction or repair of marine, locomotive, or
stationary engines, together with one year service in the engineroom as
oiler, watertender, or junior engineer;
(3) Graduation from:
(i) The U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (engineering curriculum);
(ii) The U.S. Coast Guard Academy and completion of an on-board
engineer officer qualification program required by the service;
(iii) The U.S. Naval Academy and completion of an on-board engineer
officer qualification program required by the service;
(iv) The engineering class of a Maritime Academy approved by and
conducted under the rules prescribed by the Maritime Administrator and
listed in part 310 of this title;
(4) Graduation from the marine engineering course of a school of
technology accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
Technology, together with three months of service in the engine
department of steam or motor vessels;
(5) Graduation from the mechanical or electrical engineering course
of a school of technology accredited by the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology, together with six months of service in the
engine department of steam or motor vessels

It only applies to an engineer’s license, but if that is or any interest to you this may be the shortest route to an unlimited 3/A license.

Good luck.

Thanks again to everyone for their input. HOWEVER, the conversation has digressed a bit from the inital post.

I am looking for input and insight to Seatlle MAritime Academy!! People who went there. People who have worked with grads. Also, take a look a my background and skills(flever9) and maybe give mesome advice. I am lloking at Deck not engineering, although I have the skills to do the engineering curriculum.

THE ECONOMY SEEMS TO BE IMPROVING!! KEEP OUR COLLECTIVE FINGERS CROSSED!

Well, then reread post #7 and just ignore the clause beginning with “if you choose engineering.”

Hi,
Sorry to interrupt the discussion but I’m wondering if I can get any insight from you. I moved to the Bay Area in hopes if attending CMA but am seriously considering applying to SMA instead. Only because the program is faster and seemsore geared to what I want to do, and because CMA is very militant. As a former instructor at SMA, is it a good school got someone who wants to be an engineer on ferries and eventually be a captain/ engineer. I want to be a jack of all trades and know the ferry like the back of my hand:)
Also, are students required to make formations at this school. As in standing attention and saluting the flag?
I would really appreciate any info you can give me. Thanks!

Why don’t you write or call the school?

[QUOTE=Chelsey Williams;109459]Hi,
Sorry to interrupt the discussion but I’m wondering if I can get any insight from you. I moved to the Bay Area in hopes if attending CMA but am seriously considering applying to SMA instead. Only because the program is faster and seemsore geared to what I want to do, and because CMA is very militant. As a former instructor at SMA, is it a good school got someone who wants to be an engineer on ferries and eventually be a captain/ engineer. I want to be a jack of all trades and know the ferry like the back of my hand:)
Also, are students required to make formations at this school. As in standing attention and saluting the flag?
I would really appreciate any info you can give me. Thanks![/QUOTE]

Okay Chelsey Williams, I went to SMA in 2010 and it has turned out to a great decision for me. If I had the chance to go to CMA at the time I would have probably gone there. But, for me I’m in my early 30’s, was very close to getting married to a Canadian who couldn’t work in the States yet and needed to get a move on with my career. Now if you are younger, not attached as seriously, have the means, and the aptitude I would recommend a 4yr school like CMA.Probably would have been my 1st choice. It all depends on what you want. I think your information about CMA being militant is wrong, CMA is known as Casual Maritime by lots of folks. I have worked with quite a few from there (all engineers) and they have been great. My current Chief is one of them. Also, a 2nd and a 1st I worked with were from there and they were both really smart and helpful to me. I believe CMA & Great Lakes have the most relaxed regiments too. If marching to the regiments standards is too much of a struggle for you, than you may want to consider something else, as you are going to be marching to the USCG standards for the rest of your career and they suck. haha Now, I don’t know anything about you so forgive me for saying this, I’m just trying to help, but sometimes people need to suck it up for awhile in order to reap the benefits later on. The easier path doesn’t always pay off.

So why the ferries??? I was pretty much dead set against the ferries and I’m from Tacoma and live in Ballard (Seattle). There are bigger badder things in the shipping World than ferries. They run mostly EMD’s and thats great, but I’m going to be working on a brand new MAN 2 stroke soon and that is way cooler. :slight_smile: I’m still in the part of my career where I think lots of this stuff is neat, exciting, and cool. Working on the shit tank after it overflows is nasty, but telling your buddies that you were pulling a piston out when it is nearly a 3ft in diameter is something most of them can’t possibly fathom. Not the same “wow factor” on an EMD. And don’t get me started on the back and forth thing. Since I left SMA I’ve been in South America, the GOM, South Africa, Korea, and Alaska. Not gonna get that travel on the Seattle to Bremerton run.

Also, you mention Captain/Engineer??? As far as I know that would be very hard to get the seatime for both positions and keep them current. They are two different licensing tracks. Now if it is a tiny ferry or fishing boat then I can see you being the Captain/Engineer, but don’t believe that will ever happen on something of any real size.

SMA & CMA are totally different schools incase you haven’t noticed. At CMA you can come out after 4-5yrs with a 3rd Engineers License and after one year of seatime you can get your 2nds. Seattle Maritime on the other hand gives you classroom, some experience, and a QMED with 5 ratings, and RFPEW at the end. Then you have to get 3yrs (1,080 days) of seatime as a QMED in order to TEST for your 3rd Engineer’s License. I get to earn money on the way to my 3rd’s License, but it will take more time. I think for some people CMA is a better choice longterm, and for others like me SMA was a better choice. Like I said before I would have gone to CMA, but couldn’t spend 4yrs in school. And keep in mind that there are proposed license changes for Engineers in the works. I hope this helps you. If you have anymore questions about SMA let me know.

I was giving strong consideration to attending SMA for the engineering technology program this fall too. I already have a B.S. in environmental science, and was originally considering Great Lakes Maritime Academy, but didn’t want to take out the loans and spend 3 years in school again.

After reading Steamer’s post from 8/7/09, it planted some doubt in my mind as to whether this (SMA) was the right route to take. How often is it that someone with a QMED makes it to assistant engineer? Do most oilers/pumpmen try to move up to engineer, or do they stay in that position until they leave that line of work? Thanks a lot for any feedback.

Check out the TAP program. They are available in the San Fran area and Seattle. Qualify for your QMED in 30 days. Coast Guard Approved. Contact John Hastings at 510-992-3545 for more information. They are a non-profit organization. Or, check out their website. http://www.theanchorprogram.com/