Sea sick?

Been kinda wondering about this subject ,i have seen guys out in 15ft seas in a 35ft boat with no problems but on a flat calm day they bend down to pick something up and up comes the cookies .seriously

i still get it from time to time but nothing that puts me down begging to god for mercy yadda yadda
but the worse part is i get land sick,when i get back on shore i dam near lose my cookies becasue the ground’s not moving

how many of you still deal with it ??

Anyone who says they’ve never been seasick is a dirty rotten liar and can’t be trusted. Everyone’s got their threshold, if you haven’t reached it yet then you’ve either been working on the rivers for too long or haven’t been in the industry long enough.

[QUOTE=PaddyWest2012;168649]Anyone who says they’ve never been seasick is a dirty rotten liar and can’t be trusted. Everyone’s got their threshold, if you haven’t reached it yet then you’ve either been working on the rivers for too long or haven’t been in the industry long enough.[/QUOTE]

My question is why people even feel ashamed of being seasick. There’s nothing wrong with it. I was seasick my first day out at sea, I puked, then was fine afterwards. If I ever felt sick again, I sucked on a lemon and that fixed everything.

Worst comes to worst, just have plenty of Dramamine handy. That stuff works every time.

I admit I don’t have that much sea time, but generally I’ve found smaller boats much more tolerable than bigger vessels, particularly those vomit comets that don’t just roll but go around in a kind of slow corkscrew motion. However, I don’t recall vomiting ever, but there are days when I haven’t been very hungry…

Been seasick three times.
Once when I was 5 yrs old, my Dad took me offshore for salmon, remember it like it was yesterday. Liverwurst sandwiches and slices of an orange for lunch. Barfed over the side and was given a 7-Up for a remedy.
Then when I was 21 or so. Again,offshore for salmon. Drank in a bar until closing, drove to the docks, crashed in the car for a couple of hours, ate a greasy bacon and egg breakfast and barfed over the side. Drank tomato juice and beer for a remedy.
I eventually got real sick of going to sea and recently retired.

wow ,not quite the response’s i was expecting ,but c captain hasn’t been here yet either

richm’s had me rolling

Only been sick a few times and that happened back in my fishing days. Take some time off in the winter climb back on the boat then beat your way your way offshore for twelve hours. Thoughs days are over now. I haven’t been out on a tug in anything I wouldn’t have fished right through.

I need to build a resilience every winter. 1-2 days of just hating life and then it’s over. Doesn’t matter how much North sea shit weather I experience after the first days, I don’t get sea sick.

I have heard stories about fishermen in Northern Norway who got sea sick every day at sea. That is some hard core fuckers.

I believe it.   Norwegians and those with Norge blood are about as stubborn as can be.

[QUOTE=PaddyWest2012;168649]Anyone who says they’ve never been seasick is a dirty rotten liar and can’t be trusted. Everyone’s got their threshold, if you haven’t reached it yet then you’ve either been working on the rivers for too long or haven’t been in the industry long enough.[/QUOTE]
I’ve sailed with many guys with years of sea time that ranged from queazy to various shades of green to having their assholes lodge in their throats. I never understood why the guys punished themselves (and everyone else who had to take up their slack)who suffered from the latter, would still go to sea.

I’ve never been seasick per se but I found my threshold when I was 16. On a crewboat loaded with hung-over rig hands, an olive colored roughneck filled one of my white boots as passed through the writhing mass of humanity. I believe that’s when I decided on the engine room career path.

I never got seasick before I went to sea nor while I was sailing. That includes a wide variety of vessels, from small sailboats as a kid in Santa Barbara to a trip in a head boat out of Morro Bay (where, at one point, I was the ONLY one still out on deck fishing), to sailing trough all kinds of weather on break bulk and container ships in the north Pacific and Atlantic and ocean tugs in the Gulf, Caribbean, east and west coasts . . .and even on the BELCHER PORT EVERGLADES while out of the notch where I really did need my life jacket under my rack so I could sleep without piling out on the deck. Not one whit of discomfort or unease. I do still remember my first bout of sea sickness. . . I was with ABS and trying to get a UWILD done on a jack up about an hour out of Freeport, Texas. They were trying to use Eddy Current NTD on the leg to can welds with no success. When I suggested that the switch to mag particle, it was going to take an extra 24 hours to clean the mud off of the cans, so I was sent in to save a couple of bucks. I rode in on the old PIPELINE DIVER and I started getting queasy within 5 minutes of heading in. I don’t know why because I have certainly been in smaller boats in rougher seas than that, but it wouldn’t pass. I tried to lay down on one of the benches, but finally, I could feel that night lunch starting to make its escape. I made it to the head just in time. . . I felt a bit better but was still uncomfortable until we got into the jetties. It just really surprised me. For years before and after, I have made MANY trips out and back by launch/crewboat or similar with no upset. Some of these runs (especially with the old Ryan Marine iron out of Galveston) that took up to 10 hours each way. . . There were maybe one or two other occasions where I was a bit queasy, but they passed. In the past 18 years that I have been in my present career, I have never had a repeat episode. . . . and that includes some pretty hairy runs out to lay barges and platforms. . . but I will ALWAYS remember that one trip on the PIPELINE DIVER. . . . and have a bit of sympathy for those that get seasick. Just don’t tell them.

[QUOTE=Kraken;168663]

I have heard stories about fishermen in Northern Norway who got sea sick every day at sea. That is some hard core fuckers.[/QUOTE]

yea ,i am of that breed also ,hard headed stubborn fuckers we are !! i have never experienced the north atlantic,and from some of the vids i’ve seen of it i don not ever want to either ,i’d rather go against the berring sea

When the seas are really big you can usually be to worried to be sick that works sometimes.

[QUOTE=rshrew;168692]When the seas are really big you can usually be to worried to be sick that works sometimes.[/QUOTE]

When I sailed on the hawser, I found that I didn’t get sick in heavy seas, but I did become a lot more irritable that I already was/am. . . . largely because I couldn’t work on my projects and cleaning. . . just move fuel and change filters. . .and deal with the emergencies that accompanied those kinds of seas.

[B][I]"First you think you’re going to die. Then you’re afraid you won’t.”
[/I][/B]
I’ve been seasick only once on a sailboat. But that was after eating a super sized double Big Mac combo and a large Coke in 5 minutes, just before letting go!!! I locked myself in the WC to know if I would resist. I looked myself turning green till throwing up. I had to pump the Jabsco quite a while to get rid of the double supersized. I then slept knocked out for hours.

The worst is on a passenger ship pitching in very rough head seas. Thousands of passengers throw up all over the place, at the same time and on the nicest carpets. The cabin staffs have to vacuum the green muggy vomit that spread sour smells all over the ship. If you can resist seasickness after that, you’re a heartless mule. One good thing about that is that nobody is asking you anymore at what time will be the midnight buffet…

I have never puked my guts out. Came close one time when I first started out. Worked crew boats to supply boats. I think I am lucky. That is not to say rough seas dont make me feel like shit! I get headaches, loss of appetite and a little queezy. I am on inland tugs right now because the gulf went to shit. So dont have to deal with it anymore. I still would rather be working offshore though and put up with the seas.

I’ve puked my guts right out of the wheelhouse window on a tug once…

the sea and spray washed in away in seconds…there was no evidence left which could be used in a court to convict me!

.

^^ that response surprises me!! didn’t expect the ol salt to admit to puking

now that’s tugboating at its finest!

On the USCG Confidence winter time Gulf of Alaska , I recall two or three days where it seemed everyone on the crew was sea sick. I recall on watch puking in the bridge trash can one time. After then not eating until off watch till we got out of the weather. That thing rode terrible.

On a tug we did have a rough ride leaving Yakatat Alaska one time into strong westerly wind and sea Transiting the entrance outbound the seas were too high and steep the screw was out of the water too much to get enough bite to pull the barge out to sea against the wind. It was dark night and it was raining sideways but we could see that the seas ahead of the tug were dirty green colored from our lights. We let out some wire to get the tug in deeper water and got a better bite and got the barge across. Once we got out to sea there was another big swell from the SW. Had to turn the tug into the swell for the big ones then back into the sea for the smaller swell sets. I puked into a bunch of paper towels and threw it over the side. The deck of the barge had sand on it we we went aboard the next time.

Edit: I remember another thing about that night, we took one big roll and I heard a crash then a whistling sound. I went down to the galley and the TV, this big old thing which had it’s own shelf built into the bulkhead, was missing and there was a cloud of white fog-like smoke about four feet deep filling the galley. WTH? No time to wonder, had to get back to the wheelhouse. Next morning we found the TV jammed under the table. It has worked loose and dropped to the deck, hitting the handle of the big CO2 fire extinguisher setting it off.