Preventing Burnout at Sea

Wow, you really drop to the level of perversely modifying my posts? How classy and professional of you.

@john runs a solid site

:+1:

With previous companies as CE I had permissions that allowed a lot of flexibility in creating, modifying and assigning standard jobs.

My current company has limited my NS permissions significantly. Changes can be made but need to involve the office, which typically involves considerable delay between the proposal and implementation. What winds up happening is that maintenance is tracked in Excel and in NS, with instances of one being updated and the other not becoming a common occurance.

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I too had permissions that my counterpart may not have had. I understand the office wanting to ride herd on changes for the sake of uniformity. I have dealt with several PM programs over the years and have run across tasks created covering the same or similar jobs with different numbering created by Chiefs on different ships.

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That’s fucking pathetic. No mod should do that, ever. If they want to through a hissy fit and delete a post that’s fine, but that’s a new low.

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So the question now is just how often are the mods stealth editing ex-post facto?
Also, congratulations to @chief_seadog for just utterly torpedoing this message board. Your posts are now his posts.

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Proper engineering is a mix of preventive and corrective maintenance.
Rebuilding critical equipment prior to failure is apart of this.
There are many factors beyond run hours such as load, criticality, vibration, RPM…etc. Bearings are dirt cheap. Having a shaft fabricated at a machine shop for an obsolete motor is not. Lead times for larger industrial equipment tends to be long these days.

You really come across as a disgruntled 3 A/E who thinks they know everything.
So, you seem to have it all figured out, good luck.

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Well @MarisLatvian as you can see by the dick measuring contest this has devolved into, it’s not the system automation or mental workload that burns Mainers out, It’s being stuck on a ship where the inmates are running the asylum.

We need shorter hitches and enough people so we don’t have to run a 6x6 watch.

Unless someone is already seeing a therapist on their own, I do not expect any mariner would voluntarily join in training while ashore. Or on the ship for that matter.

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We need shorter hitches and enough people so we don’t have to run a 6x6 watch.

This needs to be voted on with our feet. If you have a shitty watch or hitch apply to a company that has the hitch you want. With the Mariner shortage the ball is in our court. The company I work for now advertised and even 28 and 28 rotation. When I talked to them on the phone they said those positions were full but they would love to offer me a 28 and 14 rotation. I apologized for wasting thier time, I guess I was misinformed. Miraculously a 28 and 28 position all of the sudden opened up before I could hang up the phone. I have been with them nearly a year and a half now. I am happy, so if you don’t like what you are being served now time to move to another table.

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100% agree…and i would have to be seriously in dire straits to work for a company that does that 6x6 nonsense. No more for me if i can help it.

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Even with the mariner shortage it’s a pain in the ass changing (non union) companies because then you have new insurance, waiting for the new insurance to be active, possibly losing unvested 401k matches, etc.

That’s the reason why (non health care related) corporations oppose nationalized health care, they want you tied to them so they can treat you like shit. That’s also why low unemployment is bad for corporations and now there’s all kinds of articles complaining about unemployment being too low.

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Changing jobs is a pain in the ass. To sit and complain is easy. Even changing types of vessels seems to throw some into a panic. Nearly everbody is hiring. Find a rotation and type of vessel you like and apply. If you are not happy where you are, whos fault is that?

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Thanks for the lecture. But tell me you have no formal training or experience regarding modern maintenance practices without telling me you don’t actually know what predicative vs preventive vs reactive maintenance is. The years of experience on the fiefdom of a ship at sea creates more ignorant chiefs than enlightened ones (not saying this is you, but I’ve met plenty of poorly educated).

Years ago the industrial world, mostly lead by nuclear power and aviation figured out that more preventive maintenance doesn’t always equal better reliability–in fact, sometimes excess maintenance causes more failures, statistically.

The installation process is often overlooked as a possible cause of failure, along with the rebuilding/overhauling and routine maintenance of the asset. Equipment infant mortality is a term used to describe a failure that occurs soon after placing an asset into service. This accounts for a large portion of failures at most plants.
Strategies to Prevent Sudden-Death Bearing Failures

And regarding your perception as a 3ae that knows all…are you one of those chiefs that can’t recognize that others may be more knowledgeable? Or the chief that can’t give any credit to subordinates for solving major problems and fixing huge issues?

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I suppose perhaps not in an organization (both on the ship and shoreside) that is inefficient or lacks the ability to evaluate the history and condition of machinery but isn’t adjusting PM periods based on inspections and so forth standard practice in marine engineering?

I’m not an engineer but I have often sat at the table where engineering decisions were discussed.

It merely a case of most people at shipping companies don’t know what they don’t know. And few are involved in continuing education or professional improvement.

And the people in the office, which should be leading up such initiatives are usually idiots that are underpaid (failure to attract talent), or when talent/experience shows up, everyone argues.

Getting back at the OP’s original question, i.e., Preventing Burnout at Sea. It helps if you enjoy what you do. Without a doubt I enjoyed going to sea, even when times are not so good. It also helps if the people around you, working with, or for you work as a team. This unfortunately is sometimes hit or miss. The advent of the rotary system with regards to 2nds and 3rds put a lot more stress on the 1st and Chiefs. Getting off the ship when time and circumstances allowed always helps, even if it is for a quick bite.

For many years my rotation was 70/70 with the voyages being 35 days. I would make a point to “play” in Guam when times were slow. I would scuba dive in the afternoon. Rent or borrow a car and grab a burger at Jeff’s Pirate Cove (before it got so touristy), enjoy some beach time and dinner at Tahiti Rama (that goes w-a-y back) or a quick beer at Uncle Bob’s. In Hong Kong I might enjoy the view at the peak before heading to Ned Kelly’s. The point being here is to get off and away from the ship for a while, even if it is a short while.

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Sounds fucking stupid. Another thing to add to the pile of mandatory onboard BS when you could be working on equipment.

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That has to be the most complicated way to say ‘Don’t fuck with it’ I’ve ever seen.

Ohh, Ned Kelly’s. In Kowloon . . . uh, I mean. . . that said, I found that just getting ashore for a couple of hours, even in crappy ports, was very energizing. . . Most of my rotations were supposed to be 28x28, but often became 40 x 25. . . . but I was young and had no real shoreside attachments. CE on an ATB was a grind, but I found as I stated above, just getting away, had its catharsis. . .

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To me, it is a mental health day to get ashore and simply walk and maybe stop for a coffee or lunch. It has remarkable benefits and I wish I could do it more often.

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